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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF JOINT MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEES ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY AND OF AGRICULTURE 

September 25, 1957, 11:00 a.m., President's Office 



PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brown, Miss Buxton, 
Crowley, McNamara, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke, 
Dean Cahill of Arts and Science; 
Dean Sieling of Agriculture 



It was 

VOTED : To elect Dr. 
committee. 

The Committee 



Boyden Chairman of the joint 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the list of new undergraduate 
courses as filed with the Trustee minutes 
of September 30, 1957. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
list of new graduate courses as filed with 
the Trustee minutes of September 30, 1957. 

President Mather discussed progress of the School of 

Education since its elevation from departmental status a year ago 

and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

change in name of the Master's degree con- 
ferred by the School of Education from 
Master of Science to Master of Education. 

The Committee also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Master of Education program to include up to 
15 graduate credits, of the total of 30 re- 
quired for the degree, from graduate courses 
in fields other than Education as approved 
by the Dean of the School of Education. 



2147 



Undergraduate 
Courses 



Graduate 
Courses 



Master of 
Education 



2L48 



COMMITTEE 



Department of 
Horticulture 



Department of 
Entomology and 
Plant Pathology 



Art 
Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather, Dean Cahill and Dean Sieling discussed 

the proposed reorganization of certain departments and activities 

in the College of Arts and Science and the College of Agriculture 

and after discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
present Departments of Pomology, Floriculture 
and Olericulture to be brought together as a 
Department of Horticulture in the College of 
Agriculture and to name Professor Arthur P. 
French, now Head of the Department of Pomology, 
as Head of this new Department, effective 
October 1, 1957. 

The Committee also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
following activities to be brought together 
into a Department of Entomology and Plant 
Pathology in the College of Agriculture: 

(a) Department of Entomology 

(b) Shade Tree Laboratory 

(c) Seed Laboratory 

(d) Arboriculture (now in the Department of 

Landscape Architecture) 

(e) Plant Pathology (now in Botany) 

(f) All members of the Experiment Station and 

Extension staffs having primary 
responsibility as plant pathologists 
or botanists. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
courses in Art, now offered in the Department 
of Landscape Architecture in the College of 
Agriculture, to be transferred to the College 
of Arts and Science as soon as the President 
is convinced that the change can be made 
effectively, it being understood that when the 
change is made the present personnel in Land- 
scape Architecture who conduct Art courses will 
be transferred to the College of Arts and 
Science. 



Secretary 




COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

November 19, 1957, 10:30 a.m., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston 

Chairman Brett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Bartlett, Haigis, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept with 
gratitude the gift of Dr. Charles A. Peters, 
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, of 20 shares 
of common stock of the Dow Chemical Company 
and that this be established as an Endowment 
Fund at the cost value of the stock of 
$1,140.49 to be known as the "Charles A. 
Peters Fund" with the income to be used as 
specified in the instrument of gift for the 
unrestricted use of the Head of the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry for the benefit of the 
work of the Department of Chemistry. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees sell the 

40/100ths. interest in one share of common 
stock of the Dow Chemical Company received 
as a stock dividend and add the proceeds to 
the principal of the Charles A. Peters Fund. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees exercise the 

rights received from the Standard Oil Company 
of New Jersey using 270 rights to purchase 
9 shares of common stock at $44 per share, 
selling the four unused rights. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept the be- 
quest of $396.95 under the will of J. Clark 
Osterhout, class of 1887, which stipulates 
that the income be used as grants to needy 
students from Chelmsford or the county of 
Middlesex. 



2149 



Charles A. 
Peters Fund 



J. Clark 

Osterhout 

will 



a 



2150 



COMMITTEE 



Master Plan 
payment 



Student 
Loans 



x Investment 
Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to pay for the printing of 
the Master Plan Report, using $1,285.00 
from the Sprague Fund and such other 
amounts as necessary not exceeding $200.00 
from other unrestricted trust funds. 



I 



It was 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to write off as uncollectible 
the following student loan with accumulated 
interest : 



Name 



Bonds 



Date of Maturity Amount Fund 

Roy I. Martin June 14, 1948 $80.00 Goldthwait 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees establish the 
following investment policy and- that securi- 
ties as selected at this meeting be 
recommended to the Trustees for purchase: 

1. Liquidate approximately $90,000 savings 
bank accounts, leaving $10,000 in Amherst 
and $15,000 in Ware. 

2. Invest approximately $75,000 immediately 
in bonds of AA grade or better at 4.50% 
or better. 

3. The remaining $15,000 to be invested in 
stock, the selection of the stocks and 
the timing to be decided by the committee. 

The committee then studied a list of possible bond pur- 



I 



chases and 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to purchase the following: 



10 bonds of New Jersey Bell Tel. deb. 

10 bonds of Philadelphia Elec. 1st 

10 bonds of American Tel. & Tel. deb. 

10 bonds of Consolidated Edison N.Y. 1st 

10 bonds of Dayton Power & Light 1st 

10 bonds of Gulf States Utilities 1st 

10 bonds of Niagara Mohawk Power Gen. 

5 bonds of Tampa Electric 1st 



4 7/8 


1993 


4 5/8 


1987 


5 


1983 


5 


1987 


5 


1987 


4 7/8 


1987 


4 7/8 


1987 


5 


1987 



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1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



2151 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to purchase 200 shares of 
Southern New England Telephone Company 
stock. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




^W— " Secret ary 



I 



2L52 



COMMITTEE 



Physical 
Education 
Playing 
Fields 



A PPraisal of 
Farm Land and 
Buildings 

Appraiser 



Faculty and 
Married Student 
Housing Project 



Science 
Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

November 19, 1957, 12:15 p.m., Dr. Bartlet^s Office, Boston 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Brett, Bartlett, Haigis, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees recommend to 
the Commission on Administration and Finance 
for appointment to design the Physical Educa- 
tion Playing Fields for Men the name of 
Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates, Registered 
Land Surveyors and Civil Engineers, South 
Deerfield, Massachusetts. 

It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees engage S. H. 
Graham, Burlington, Massachusetts, retired 
Civil Service Federal Land Bank Appraiser, 
to make an appraisal of the farm land and 
buildings that the Trustees plan to acquire 
under the provisions of Item 8258-34 of 
Chapter 763 of the Acts of 1957 which appro- 
priated $150,000 for the purchase of certain 
land and buildings thereon, provided that 
Treasurer Johnson interviews Mr. Graham and 
is satisfied with him prior to employing him. 

The committee examined plans for the faculty and married 

student housing project and for the Science Center and, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
plans for the Faculty and Married Student 
Housing Project and that the Trustees execute 
a land lease and a building lease with the 
University of Massachusetts Building Associa- 
tion for this project. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
final plans for the Science Center. 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather discussed the need for additional dormi- 
tories as the new classroom and laboratory buildings are completed 
so that the University can take more students. He pointed out also 
that the operation of the University on a 12-months basis will be 
another factor in bringing about the need for additional dormi- 
tories. He suggested that the next authorization from the Legisla- 
ture should be in a large enough amount so that the Building 
Association can plan ahead on its bond sales and construction to 
provide housing for about 2,000 students over the next three years 
plus adding two more units in the faculty-married student apartment 
area. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees request the 

University of Massachusetts Building Associa- 
tion to obtain appropriate legislative 
authorization for the construction of dormi- 
tories and other housing on a self-liquidating 
basis for the needs of the University for the 
next three years, with a total authorization of 
$7,000,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:25 p.m. 




Secretary 



2 1 53 



Dormitories 



2154 



COMMITTEE 



Murray D. and 
Anne Lincoln 

land 



Freedom 
Bill 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 30, 1957, 2:00 p.m., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Cashin, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

The President and Treasurer discussed a proposed gift 

of land from Murray D. Lincoln of the Class of 1914 and his wife, 

Anne H. Lincoln. The land is located in Blendon Township, Franklin 

County, Ohio (near Columbus) and consists of some 108 acres which 

is to be given to the University over a period of years. The land 

may be sold at any time by the Trustees and the proceeds used as 

a Murray D. Lincoln endowment with the income to be used in any 

manner that the Trustees may determine. Mr. & Mrs. Lincoln would 

like to present 19.888 acres from this parcel at the present time. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept with appreciation the gift of 
19.888 acres of land located in Blendon 
Township, Franklin County, Ohio from 
Murray D. and Anne H. Lincoln. 

It was also 

VOTED : To establish the Murray D. Lincoln Fund 
on the books of the University as an un- 
restricted endowment comprising the 19.888 
acres of land given by Murray D. Lincoln 
of the Class of 1914 and his wife Anne H. 
Lincoln at a value to be based on an 
appraisal to be furnished by Mr. Lincoln. 

President Mather said that the State Comptroller has 
questioned the University's interpretation of certain powers of 
the Trustees under Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956. It has been 
agreed between the Comptroller and the President that the Univer- 
sity will seek an official opinion of the Attorney General for 



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I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts to be held Monday, December 30, 1957 at 
2:00 p.m. at the office of Dr. Bartlett, 294 Washington Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 



/ Signature 



Date &£^l.&'8 /&~> 



1 



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I hereby agree to valve 7 days' notice of the tnaeting of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts to be held Monday > December 30 , 1957 at 
2:00 p. la. at the office of Dr. Bartlett, 294 Washington Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 




Date 



**<■ 3°- ■**- , 



1 



1 



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1 



I hereby agree Co waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts to be held Monday, December 30, 1957 at 
2:00 p. Ei. at the office of Dr. Eartlett, 294 Washington Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

Signature 



Date 




I 



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I hereby agree to waive 7 days* notice of the meeting of the 
Esecutive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts to be held Monday, December 30, 1957 at 
2:00 p.m. at the office of Dr. Eartlett, 294 Washington Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 




Signature 



Bate 




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I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the tsaetiog of the 
Executive Conmittee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts to be held Monday, December 30, 1957 at 
2:00 p.si. at the office of Dr. Bartlett, 294 Washington Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts . 



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I hereby agree to waive 7 days 1 notice of the meeting of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts to be held Monday, December 30, 1957 at 
2:00 p.m. at the office of Dr. Bartlett, 294 Washington Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 




Dat e Al£>C* SiD 

— — — M T 



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2 1 55 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

clarification of certain provisions of Chapter 556. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chairman of the Board to 

request an official opinion of the Attorney 
General for clarification of certain pro- 
visions of Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956. 

It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the President to file legisla- 
tion to clarify the powers of the Trustees 
under Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p^m. 




Secretary 



Chairman 



2156 



COMMITTEE 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Appraisal of 
Farm Land & 
Buildings 



Phys ical 
Education 
Playing 
Fields 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

February 20, 1958, 11:00 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Haigis, Taber, 
Treasurer Johnson 

The committee reviewed the proposed 5-year capital out- 
lay program which has been in the hands of all members of the Board 
for about a week and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
attached capital outlay program for the 
fiscal year 1959 and for the period 1960 
through 64. 

The committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer to enter into an agreement with 
Selwyn H. Graham for the appraisal of certain 
farm land and buildings under appropriation 
item 8254-42, Chapter 763, Acts of 1957 at a 
fee of $6.00 per hour plus travel expenses 
for all work except court testimony and prepara- 
tion of court testimony, if necessary, which 
shall be at a fee of $12.00 per hour plus 
travel expenses; provided that for work other 
than court testimony the total fee for any one 
day shall not exceed $50.00. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 

Treasurer to employ Gordon E. Ainsworth & Asso- 
ciates of South Deerfield to make land surveys 
of certain land to be acquired under appropria- 
tion item 8258-34 of Chapter 763, Acts of 1957. 

It was 



F 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer to execute for and in the name of 
the Board of Trustees a land lease agreement 
leasing 19.888 acres of land in Township of 
Blandon, County of Franklin, State of Ohio 
to Murray D. Lincoln in accordance with a 
lease agreement presented to the meeting for 
a period of one year from January 1, 1956 
with automatic renewal for five successive 
years unless previously terminated. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 



2157 



Murray D. 
Anne H. 
Lincoln - 
land 




] 



2158 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



t 



1 



Revised 

September 18, 1957 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1959 

DBC 
Priority 

A-9 1. School of Education and Laboratory 

Practice School $2,200,000 

(Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 763 
of the Acts of 1957) 

A-8 2. Science Center - Third Section, including 1,666,000 

furnishings and equipment and working 

drawings for Fourth Section 
(Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 763 
of the Acts of 1957 

A- 10 3. Infirmary, including furnishings and 1,040,000 

equipment (Appropriation for plans, 
Chapt. 763 of the Acts of 1957) 

A-l 4. Additional Boilers, including Addition to 1,000,000 

Utility Distribution Systems, Steam, 

Electric, Water and Sewer 

B-56 5. Engineering & Physics Shops, including 800,000 

furnishings and equipment 
(Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 763 
of the Acts of 1957) 

B-59 6. Addition to Dining Commons, including 360,000 

furnishings and equipment 

B-60 7. General Maintenance Building 600,000 

(Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 763 
of the Acts of 1957) 

B-55 8. Cold Storage Laboratory, including equip- 375,000 
ment (Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 
763 of the Acts of 1957) 

C-91 9. Plans for Physical Education Building for 138,000 
Men, including furnishings, equipment 
and site improvements 

C-92 10. Plans for Natural Resources Building 55,000 

C-93 11. Poultry Plant Laboratories and Buildings 250,000 



Total $8,484,000 



2/7/58 



» . ' ■ - & >. 



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I 



February 10, 1958 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FOR THE FISCAL YEARS 1960-64 



1960 

1. Science Center - Section 4, including $2,500,000 

furnishings and equipment 

2. Physical Education Building for Men, 2,500,000 

including furnishings and equipment 

3. Addition to Utilities - Steam, Electric, 200,000 

Water and Sewer 

4. Natural Resources Building, including furnishings, 1,000,000 

equipment and site improvements 

5. Plans for Addition to Food Technology Building 50,000 

6. Plans for Addition to Physics Building 100,000 

7. Plans for Classrooms and Offices, School of 73,000 

Business Administration 

8. Plans for Animal Science Building 100,000 

9. Plans for Engineering Building 75,000 

10. Service Building for Experiment Station, 100,000 

including furnishings and equipment 

11. Renovate Laboratories - Flint Building, 40,000 

including equipment 

12. Physical Education Fields, including drainage, 200,000 

grading and seeding 



Total $6,938,000 



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CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -2- 
1961 

1. Classrooms and Offices - School of Business $1,260,000 

Administration, including furnishings 
and equipment 

2. Addition to Food Technology Building, 900,000 

including furnishings and equipment 

3. Addition to Physics Building, including 2,000,000 

furnishings and equipment 

4. Animal Science Building, including furnishings 2,000,000 

and equipment 

5. Engineering Building, including furnishings 1,500,000 

and equipment 

6. Plans for Administration Building 75,000 

7. Plans for Assembly Hall and Field House 139,000 

8. Additions to Utility Distribution Systems 200,000 



] 



Total $8,074,000 



1962 

1. Administration Building, $1,575,000 

including furnishings and equipment 

2. Assembly Hall and Field House, 3,000,000 

including furnishings and equipment 

3. Plans for a Plant Science Building 83,000 

including greenhouses 

4. Additions to Utility Distribution Systems 200,000 

5. Coal Storage Facilities, including railsiding, 500,000 

equipment, and equipment building 

6. Plans for a Dining Commons 75,000 

7. Plans for a Classroom Building 50,000 



Total $5,483,000 



F 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 



1963 

1. Dining Commons, including furnishings and 

equipment 

2. Plant Science Building & Greenhouses, including 

furnishings and equipment 

3. Classroom Building, including furnishings and 

equipment 

4. Plans for Fine Arts Building, including 

furnishings and equipment 

5. Additions to Utilities 

6. Plans for Second Addition to Library 

Total 
1964 

1. Second Addition to Library, including 

furnishings and equipment 

2. Fine Arts Building, including furnishings 

and equipment 

3. Addition to ROTC Building 

4. Addition to Utilities 

5. Plans for Graduate Science Research 

Laboratory 

6. Athletic Facilities and Fields, 500,000 

including site development, grading, 
drainage, paving, seeding, field 
structures and equipment 

7. Plans for Farm Buildings 100,000 



$1 


,500 


000 


1 


,650 


000 


1 


,000 


000 




100 


000 




200 


000 




100 


000 


$4 


,550 


000 


$2 


,000 


000 


2 


,000 


000 


Federal Funds 




200 


000 




150 


000 



Total $4,950,000 



TOTAL -- CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM $29,995,000 



>$J 



COMMITTEE 



1 



2159 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2160 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



• 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

February 20, 1958, 11:00 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Boyden, Miss Buxton, Crowley, 
Kiernan, Perry, Bartlett, President 
Mather, Secretary Burke 



Dr. Boyden said that all members of the committee and of 

the Board have had write-ups of the actions to be considered this 

morning by the committee. He asked if there were any questions and 

called upon President Mather to discuss the recommendations. It 

was then 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
attached list of new graduate courses of 
study. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

revision of the curriculum and course offer- 
ings in Recreation Leadership in accordance 
with the attached outline. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
offering of a major in Physical Education 
for Women in accordance with the attached 
outline. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

sabbatical leaves as outlined on the attached 
sheet . 

It was 



2161 



Graduate 
Courses 



Recreation 
Leadership 
Courses 



Physical 
Education 
for Women 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



2162 



COMMITTEE 



Regional 

Cooperative 

Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the University to admit students from the 
other New England states taking programs 
of study under the New England Land-Grant 
College Regional Study Program at the in- 
state tuition rate, it being understood 
that the University will determine which 
of its programs are to be offered to out- 
of-state students on this basis. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 




Secretary 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY CF 52&3SM5HOSKTTS 

E-fetaorandosa 

Froa: Graduate Office Date: February 5, 1958 

To: Hr. Jases H. Burke 

Subject: BscraEaendat ions for cere "200" category courses for Graduate School 

The Graduate School Council recossaends to the President and Board 
of Trustees approval of the following courses for graduate students only: 

291. 3EKE&&E. Research tsstkods in Agricultural Engineering. 

Credit, 1 
The Staff. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

201. mWWBmmS X» K0TBXTISJ3 EDUCATION. Consideration is given 
to (1) interpretation of changing and new concepts}, (2) interpretation 
of technical material; (3) place of nutrition in schools and public 
health programs. 1& 

Prerequisites: Eosse Economics 52 or 6 credits in physiological sciences. 
3 class hours. Credit ^3. 

Mrs. Cook 

• % 
250. BBS. KbKAGBHBHI FOE TOMY'S FAMILIES. Eaphasis on raanagesect 
principles involved in family economics, isork simplification, and 
decision saking in the feosse. For teachers, Extension workers, and others 
«ho vjork in an advisory capacity with families. 

Prerequisites: B.S. degree in Hess© Economics including Bests Economics 
175 and 77, or equivalent; and professional experience. 

Credit, 2-3. 
Hiss Strattner (with 
Llcsa Management Specialists and Research Staff 
in Fan&Iy Finance) Stsasaar Workshop, 1958. 

ZOOLOGY 

265. AKIMaL BEHAVIOR. The evolution and significance of behavior 
patterns including territorialism, sating, parental care, migration and 
orientation of invertebrates and lesser vertebrates. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 153; 180 ©r 181 or 182; and 169 or 170. 
2 2~h©ur lecture«dlscussion periods. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Bartlctt and Mr. Kitting 

240. ABVAECSB CELLSUR MS COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. Detailed study 
of one or store topics fros* limited fields trhich have broad ieaplicaticns 
in biology. Such topics include: radiation biology, physiological 
adaptations, cnsysology, and subaicroscopic structure of protoplasm. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 183 and 184. Credit, 2-4. 

Mr. Ssrenson, Mr. Roberts, and Mr. Honor 



"-- 



a 



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-2- 

286. PBIKCIPLES OF SYSTEMATIC ZOOLOGY. The objectives, approaches 
end results of research in systematic zoology will be discussed. To be 
considered are the procedures applicable to bincaial naaing with partic- 
ular eaiphasis on analytical procedures for deteaaLning lower tasonoaic groups. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 153, 171, 172, and one of the following: 170, 
180* 181, or 132. Credit, 2. 

The Staff. 

GEOLOGY 

The following coarse replaces 204, Igneous and Metaiaarphie petrology: 
203. XGUEOUS PETS.0LCGY. The description, classification, origin, 
and alteration of igneous rocks. Examination of rocks in hand specimen 
and in thin section under the taicroscope. 1957-58 and each alternate year. 
Prerequisites, Geology 56 and 201. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Farquhar. 

206. E3STAM0SFH1C PETROLOGY. The description, classification, and 
origin of tactsssorphic rocks, Microscopic study of suites of thin sections. 
1958-59 and each alternate year. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisites: Geology 56 and 201. Mr. Farquhar. 

228. K&P IMTEI1PEETATZQH. A laboratory study of the various types 
of asps used by geologists, with special reference to the identification 
and interpretation of landforss and structures. 

Prerequisites: Geology 53, 72, and 39. Credit, 2. 

Mr. Seith. 

236. AEWAKC3D STRUCTUHM. GEOLOGY. A survey of the dynamics of 
crastal deformation, including isostasy, orogeny, esperfecetal studies, 
and mechanical principles. 1959-60 and each alternate year. 
Prerequisites, Geology 53, 72, and 78. Credit, 2. 

233. ADVANCED PE0S0GEGLCGY. A laboratory study of surface expression 
as a key to subsurface phenomena as illustrated by specific areas. 
1959-60 and each alternate year. Credit, 2. 

Prerequisites: Geology 189 s 191. Mr. Sssith. 

SOCIOLOGY 

" 264. SHE raxZVXDOAL AS© SOCIETY IB CBOSS-CULT01AL PESSPECTXyE. 
A cress-cultural consideration of the relationship between the individual 
and society. Attention will be directed to theories, tsetkods and 
es^irical findings as reported in anthropological literature. 
Prerequisites: Sociology 153, 154 or equivalent. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Swartz. 

EBUCATIOH 

" 230. C0MPAPJEIVE EDUCATION. Studies of conteaporary educational 
systems in such countries as England, Franco, Germany, Ectasia, and Japan. 
Prerequisite, Education 151. Credit, 2-3. 

FOOD TECHKOLCGY 

The following course replaces Food Technology 201, 202, Special 
Invest igat ion3 : 

203. RESEARCH PEOJECT. gesearch on food technology problems not 
related to the thesis. For Ph.D. candidates only. Credit, 1-4. 

The Staff. 



1 



~3- 

ST&TISTICS 

Statistics 216. ADVANCED APPLIED STATISTICS. Various esperi- 
rental designs, the assort ions uaderlyisg their use, and the appro- 
priate statistical analyses will be presented. Included will be such 
topics as orthogonal and randoisiECd designs, trend analysis, noa- 
psrciBCtric techniques, and ssslti-variate analysis. 
Prerequisite, Psychology 175, or the equivalent. Credit, 3. 

t&e. tfyere. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

272. AWAECED ISBUSTEZAL PSYCHOLOGY '7.1. A consideration o£ the 
theory and principles o£ ssaa-aachine-eavirotHsant systems. In regard to 
Eas'-Eschisjs interactions special attention is given to description, 
analysis, and synthesis in terms of information theory, servo analogues 
and operations research. Operations research will be considered only as 
it applies to the contest of industrial psychology. In regard to can- 
environment interactions special consideration is given to psychophysiological 
effects. Attention is also given to current oaethods and practice. 
Prerequisites: Psychology 186 and 271. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Teichner. 



(af Gilbert L. Wocdside 



1 



+ 



1 



1 



University of Kassaehusotts 
mwmmm 

Frort: Shaanon EcCune, Provost Bate: Beccs&cr 2, 1957 

To: Course of Study Comlttce 

Subject: Scvision of Curriculum end Course Offerings in Sacreation Leadership 

Throughout its previous history at the University of ISassachueetts the 
EOjor curriculum in Recreation leadership bag been restricted to the upper division. 
This practice has been unsatisfactory and has been a esajor facte? in the inadequacies 
of our graduating majors. 

As a result of its transfer to the Division of Physical Hdacation a store 
professional type of programs is sow possible. In the revised curriculua liberal 
arts education, professioeel core, and specialisation parallel and ccsplcxaent each 
other. This plan should increase lactivation with regard to the liberal acts edu- 
cation, allow for exploration Co determine whether recreation leedorohlp is the 
correct choice of cajor, and allot-? sufficient etee for a progression of courses in 
the specialisation. 

In general pattern this program is sitailar to the professional ©ajor in 
Physical Education for S&a. 

The proposed curriculum cacoEgsasscn these concerns : 

1. Exploration, atjd Orientation (introduction to recreation- ssploratory leadership 

experience) . 

2. General Liberal Arts Education 

3« Background. Undcrs t aadinga appropriate for any coasaanity leader (psychology, 

sociology, govcrcaent, public health). 
*• Qane ral .j&adcgs hip . Abffi ities (speaking, tsriting, audio-visual aids, first aid, 

group leadership, recognition of eosssunicable diseases). 
5* Basic Skills and leadership ability in each of the taportont program areas 

(arts and crafts, capping, drana, tGusic, nature, physical, and social). 

6, Sj^ciali^stion in one or two progress areas, or in a sesjucEae appropriate to 
a opceiaiiced"eypc of enploysseat, such as hospital recreation (elect ives). 

7. Professional Attitude (Concepts ii* recreation, professional conference 
attendance) . 

®« ^SESSS|£S^^§IS§!MHlS2KSS^SHSI£ (practice leadership). 

Analysis of credits: 

1. General arts and science education 

2. Gencrul»profcsBional education (background) 

3. Specialised professional » theory 

4. Specialised professional - skills 

5. Practice leadership 

6. Electives (patterned on occupational c. 

7. Military (for oen) 



The credit totals vary: 



fflnixzsm 





42 credits 


I) 


27 


N 




23 


.#•» 




10 


II 




6 


II 




12-24 


W 




4 


M 


Cojaen 




Mm 


:;yo 




130 


138 




142 






(I 



■ 






• 


















3 



-2- 

Di££erences between the requirements for sen and weaken ore doe to the 
military requirement. Variations between sicifaua and asasiaua are due to the de- 
stands o£ the specialisations. 

f&ile accreditation o£ recreation departments is cot yet in existence, 
tentative standards have been formulated and tested by inspection o£ the prograas 
at several institutions. The proposed curriculum would seat chose standards. 
The present curriculum does not. 



1 



The proposed catalogue description o£ the major is as follows: 

RECBEATIOSI LEADERSHIP 8. E. Randall, Adviser 

The department seeks to prepare sen and wosen for positions involving 
administrative, supervisory and program leadership responsibilities in municipal 
recreation agencies, voluntary and youth serving agencies, hospitals, and industrial 
and institutional organisations. . 

The program is designed to provide opportunities for a general education, 
a knowledge and understanding of people and society, activity skills and resource 
knowledge, professional cos^etency, and practical experience in various leadership 
situations. 

Zn addition to the curriculum as described below, the student is required 
to 1) attend a pro£essional conference approved by the department; 2) participate 
in prograKsdj^ activities at the Student Onion, with a scout troop, or in a similar 
setting approved by the department; 3) devote one suggaer (minimum six: weeks) to a 
recreation practicum, with or without pay; and 4) elect a selection of courses 
which will enhance his professional background. 

Among the required courses are the following: Physical Education 9, 
badminton and basketball; P. E. 36, aquatics; P. K. 39, Tennis and taieor recreational 
sports; P. E. 64, gases and archery; P. E. 69 and 70, recreational dance and winter 
sports; and P. E. 84, golf, and volleyball. These courses apply to both men and 
women and will be taught jointly or by separate sections as appropriate. 

FRESHEN TEAS 



1 



1st Seessster 




Credits 


2nd Semester Credits 


English 1 




2 


English 2 2 


Speech 3 




2 


Bgath 12, Functional 3 


Botany 1 


4 


3 


Zoology 1 3 


Goveraasnt 25, American 




3 


History 26, American 3 


Sociology 23, Intro. 




3 


Physical Education 22, First Aid, Safety 3 


Recreation 1, Intro. 




3 


Recreation L. 2, Social 2 


Physical Education 9, Skills & Tech. 


1 


Physical Education 64, Skills & Tech. 1 


Military 1 (seen) 


(men) 


1 
IS 


Mllitarv 2 teen) 1 




(sen) 18 




(wooes) 


17 


(women) 17 






f 



d 



-3- 



J 



1st Segssfcgg 

English 25 

Art 75, Art Appreciation, or 

HttCic 51, Discover icg £&sic 

Recreation L, 25, Group Leadership 

Physical Education 39, Skills & Tech. 

Hose Econcaiee 63, Arts sad Crafts 

Military 25 (sen) 

Elective 



sopisssoaE year 

Credits 2nd Segeater Credits 

3 English 26 3 

3 Zoology 54, Field Katurai History 3 

Speech 76, Stage Direction 3 

Eecrcation L. 26, Camp Counseling 3 
Physical Education 36, Skills 6 Tech. 1 

Psychology 26 3 

Military 26 (sea) 1 



(eon) 



3 
1 
3 
1 
3 



17 

16 



(sen) 



17 
16 



lot Seaestcr 
Mesic 55, Org. 6 Bir. of Choral Gas. 
Psychology 93, Adol. or 94 Child 
Public Health 61, Gen. & Cosaaunity 
Recreation L. 63, nature Sec. 
Physical Education 69, Skills & Tech. 



juiacfi 

Credits 
2 

3 ;; 
3 

3 

1 -., 



2nd Sctsester 



Credits 



^Sociology Si, Urban &/or eleetive s 3* 6 



15-13 



l&sic 56, Org. & &&V* °£ Inst. Gps. 2 
Psychology 62, Social '■''*■' 3 

Education 66, Audio-visual Aids 3 
Recreation L. 56, Oper. of Rec. Fac. 3 
Physical Education 70, Skills 6 Tech. 1 
^Sociology 52, Rural &/©r olectives 3- 6 



15-18 



--Sociology 51 or 52 required 



1 



1st Seaaster 

Recreation L. 77, Org. & Ads., of 

Coses. Recreat ion 
Recreation L. 79, Practice, Idshp. 
Journalise 75, Bees CoBsstroication 
Sociology 75, Social Problems 
Electives 



SEHXOR IfEAR 

Credits 2nd Semester J Credits 

,-,. Recreation L. 90, Concepts in Bee. * 2 

3 ^Recreation L. 80, Practice Ldskp. 3 

3 ; : Speech 91, Ezteapore 3 

3 Physical Education 84i Skills & Tech. 1 

3 Slectiveo 6-9 

3-6 



15-18 



I 



15-18 



of 
1. 



The proposed curriculum necessitates various 
this department as follows: 



chafes in the course offerings 



Change Rec. L. 51 (I) Principles of Recreation; to Sec. L. 1 (I) Introduction to 

Recreation. 



1 



2. 
3. 



4. 



Change title of Rec. L. 79 (I) 80 (XX) Recreation Leadership Guidance and 
Practice; to Practice Leadership. 

Change Rec. L. 52 (XX) Group Leadership and Cerap Counseling; to Rec. L. 26 (XX) 

Cas& Counseling; and ©edify description to read: 

A study of the organised ceap and the counselor* a part in it, including 
characteristics, organisation, operating procedures, and pregrea. Major 
capbssis is given to caaper guidance end the acquisition of caapiag and progra&t 
skills. Each student eill participate in leadership experiences of various 
kinds frosj panel presentations zo assuming the counselor's role for a licit ad 
tiac during the tee-night ensping trip. 



(2 class hours, 1 2-hour laboratory period) 



Credit, 3. 



Delete prerequisites for Bee. £>. 77 (X) Organisation and Administration of 
Coasnnity Bccreattoa. 



at 






























e 












7 



j 



i 



i 



5. Brag, Esc. L. 74 (II) The Secrcation Program. 

6. Md See. L 2 (I) Social Becreation 

Organisation, leadership* sad activity skill© for the planning and cor&duct- 
ing ©a social recreation pregroGes. 

(1 class hour: 1 2»hour laboratory period.) Credit, 2. 

7. Add Bee. X>. 25 (X) Group Leadership 

Successful leadership techniques for formal and infowaal groups o£ various 
age razees sad in various settings: clubs, cosssittees, discussion groups, 
panels, oyagositts©, trips, unorganised activities, and the lilts. Practical 
experience through role-playing and student presentations is emphasised. 

(2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period.) Credit, 3. 

8. A dd Ssc. I.. 53 (1) Mature Recreation 

©rgaaiastioa, current practices? leadership, and activity skills for 
recreational progress based upon interest in the natural sciences. 

(1 class hour | 1 2-hour laboratory period) Credit, 2. 

Prerequisite, Zoology 54, or consent of instructor 

9. Add lee. L. 56 (IX) Operation of Becreatien Facilities 

" Playgrounds, youth centerSj. ecEssiaity recreation centers, day eansps, 
residence cssps, and par&s are considered with regard to layouts, maintenance, 
sceedulieg* adaptation of prograsi to available facilities, leadership, program 
supplies end cquips&nt, and provioioa© fox health and safety. Field trips ore 
required. 

(3 class hours) Credit, 3. 

10. Add See. h SS (XX) Concepts is Secrestioa 

Critical consideration of basic concepts and of current viewpoints end 
problems. 

(2 class hours) Credit, 2. 

11. Add Rcc. L. 31 (I) §2 (XX) Special frebleES 

Xndividuol intensive study of on aspect of recreation and the presentation 
of results in written form, 

(Eours by arrangement) Credit 2-3 

2his course is not a part of the required curriculum. It is needed to 
enrich the prograa for advanced students in certain of the specialisations. 



r 



i 



The revision of the curriculum in jrecreciion leadarsa&p also necessitates 
the addition of the soBswiEg courses: 

Skills end Techniques in Recreation leadership 

12. Add p. E, 9 CI) Skills end Techniques 

Bevelojssent o£ ruEdaise&tal skills end sethods of teaching end organising 
groups for participation in badsaintoa end basketball. 

(60 clock house) Credit, i. 

13. Add P. E. 39 (2) Skills end Techniques 

SeveiqpsEent o£ feindasjantai skills end saethods of teaching end organising 
groups for participation in Tennis end sainor recreational sports. 

(60 clock hears) Credit, 1. 

14. &S& P. 3. 69 (I) 70 (IX) Skills end Techniques 

BavelopEsent of fundasEentel skills end taethode of teaching and organising 
groups for participation in winter sports and the various dance foras including 
ethnic, social and raodero. 

(60 clock hours) Credit, 1. 



/s/ Shannon McSsiise 
Broveat 



I 



f 



UHIVEHSITT 03" MASSACHUSETTS 
Division of Physical Blucatlon 
A Curriculum for Teacher Training for Women 



For several years there has heen an Increasing number of requests from high 
school students and students now enrolled In the University for a major In physi- 
cal education for women. During the same time the decrease In teachers in this 
field is appalling. The completion of the Women's Physical Education building and 
the continued increase in the number of women students make such a major course 
both possible and practical at the University of Massachusetts. 

The staff of the department of physical education for women has prepared this 
curriculum and herewith submits it for consideration and action. 

The curriculum Includes general cultural subjeots in order to provide a liberal 
education, sciences which afford the background for the professional training and the 
professional subjects themselves, plus the opportunity for practice in the various 
fields of physical education, elementary, secondary, college or adult. 

The curriculum Is planned to educate a teacher to be well rounded In the field 
of physical education and ready to take her place either in the elementary or second- 
ary schools of the Commonwealth or elsewhere. It is felt that such a ulan for gener- 
al teacher training should be established first. Then, when numbers and interests 
Indicate the need the curriculum may be broadened to include specialisation in dance, 
sports, adaptive (corrective) and health education. 

Women students who major In physical education are seldom interested in teach- 
ing in the elementary schools unless they are brought into contact with children of 
that age. This curriculum attempts to acquaint the prospective teacher with the 
child and his school In order to aid in alleviating this particular teacher shortage. 

There are frequent requests for women physical education teachers to teach 
health and hygiene classes in both the elementary and secondary schools. Judicious 
•election of elective courses in Public Health, Home Economics, Psychology and Soci- 
ology added to the two required courses could give a background In health education. 

This curriculum follows the general pattern of requirements in the University. 
It is similar to the program in physical education for men and the two programs have 
some courses In common, but It meets the unique requirement for training women teach- 
ers in physical education. Guidance in the choice of electives will provide a prepa- 
ration which will meet the requirements for certification in most states. 

Bespectfully submitted, 

(Signed) HUTH J. TOTMAN 

For the Women's Physical 15ducation Staff. 






" 



■ 






... 



Ivt - 






- 









■ 



' 









- 



■ 
■ 



- 



■ 



■ 









v<* 



CUB&ICUXJM F0& EGSEK'S PHYSICAL KBOCATIC81 



I. 



1 



1st 

English 1 2 

Speech 3 2 

History 5 3 
PE 1 Introduction to Physical 

Edae&tion 2 

Math. 12 or 1 3 

PS 11 Skills 1 

Select ©as _JL 

16 



English 2 2 

History 6 3 

Zoology 1 3 

PS 2 Introduction Co the Child 

through Physical Education 2 

PS 9 ISsolfch f off Malta 2 

PE 12 Skills 1 

Select ©as?. 3 

16 



Chasiistry 1 and 2 is Required if students have sot had ehmsistry in 
high school. Others say elect from Ch©aal8try 9 Physics, Bacteriology 
osr Foreign Lcngesge. If Foreign Language is elected here a later 
elective isast be used for a science to asset the University reguiffai&Qnt. 
PS Motor Skills will sE&eft 6 hoars per \$eek. 



I 



English 25 

Psychology 26 general 
Sociology 25 
PE 41 Anatesy 
Music 51 
PS 31 SkUle 



PS 73 History end Principles of 
Physical Education 

Psychology 56 Educational 

PS 60 Analysis of fihythm 

PE 53 Physical Education in EIcsbsb- 
tary Schools 

PE 51 Skills 6 Teaching Methods 

Elect ives 



Ed. 52 Principles & Methods 

Ed. 88 Secondary School Curriculum 

Ed. 85 Practice Teaching 

PE 81 Adaptive Physical Education 

PE 61 Skills & Teaching Methods 



II. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 

16" 



3 
3 

3 

3 
2 

JL 

17 



3 
3 
6 
3 
2 
17 



III. 



English 26 

Bee. L. 26 Cm® Counseling 

Gcversxent 25 

Zoology 35 Vertebrate Physiology 

PS 22 First Md and Safety 

PE 30 Asiatics 

PS 32 Skills 



PS 70 Organisation and Administra- 
tion of Physical Education 
PS 42 Kinesiology 

PE 56 Methods and Principles of 
Health Education for Blesaentary 
and Seeoadsry Schools 

PS 52 Skills & Teaching Methods 

Blectives 




IV. 



PE 74 Tests 6 £&ssurea&nts 

PS 86 SeedLnor 

PE 78 Physiology of Exercise 

PE 62 Skills & Te&ehiog Methods 
Slectlves 


17 

3 
3 
3 
2 
6 



17 









i 



I 



I 



I 



// 



1 



BXSTBXBOSXOH <BP TBS CCUBSE3 IK MSAS 

A comparison of the three majors in the division of 
Physical Education 



A. General Arcs essd Sciescas 

6. General Pirofesoional Beefogrosine. 

T. Specialised Professional (Theory) 

S. Specialised Professional (Skills) 

P. Practice TeaeMsig 

M. Mlitmry Teaching 

E. Elective 



Physical Education 



43 


48 


21 


22 


38 


32 


8 


12 


6 


6 


4 





9-18 


15 



Becraetien 
Leadership 

42 

27 

23 

16 

6 

4 
12-24 



I 



.£. 1 ISISflBtXSEXCB! TO PHYSICAL SBFCfiSKSM F€t& TOSH 
class hours, 1*2 hour laboratery 



Credit, 2. 



This course will serve to acquaint the TOEiem stas&amts with the seed for 
physical activity for the vorietse e$e groups from the grcwis® child to the adult; 
the students will study the rasge of activities for girls and boys, and wcaen, pre- 
seated in pregrassi of physical education and the fundamental s&ter skills basic to 
these pctig-prass* They will also consider the need, trends and opportunities in 
physics! ©ducatleo. 



p. So 2 mmmaanm to the c&xlq xh msswm* mmmim 

2 class hours, 1-2 hour laboratory 



Credit, 2. 



This course will serve to acquaint the student with the school child by 
©bservatiea of the child in the school pregasasi, by reading of pertinent literature, 
and by discussion® following the observation periods. The process of physical de- 
veiepessnt of the child, changes in body build, posture and Esotor proficiency will 

be observed end evaluated. 



p.b. 9 w&mi m mms 

2 doss hours. 



Credit, 2. 



fThis course alias to survey the health problems of the individual and, to 
less extent » the comsaaity from on adult point of view. It will atta&pt to con- 
ider the iBEaadiote preblcss confronting the college student and to project into 
the future in Marriage and family health problem. 



I 



I 



I 






i 



.£. 11, 12, 31, 32. SKILLS. 

class hoars. Credit, 1. 



Bering the freshman and aephoiHOsre years the classes in saotor skills will 
alaa to aeauaint the student with a wide range of activities «£iieh are suitable for 
girls and «Rmsn. These will include individoal sports, team sports and several 
types of daneiag. 

P.S. 51, 52, 61, 62. SKILLS AND E8&GTO© ISESHGBS, 

6 class hews. Credit, 2. 

Barii® the junior and senior years the «^hasis ie all esstor skill classes 
will be en preparation for teaching. Ls^sovascat ia individual parforass&ce will 
coot lame to be of interest. 

P.E. 30 AQpfiEICS. 

2 class houses 2 laboratory hours. Credit, 2. 

This course is designed to give students of varying; abilities instruction 
in swiaasisg sad diving, life-saving, synchronised a^&saaing;, recreational ewissalng 
sad swisBsieg suse&s. It will provide studmfcs with bae&graead Material aad inform- 
tion that will be helpful to thea in teaching these forms of elastics. Certiflea- 

Iien as Sfefeax Safety Instructor will be aw&ssded to the ©totaxts slss raeet the 
tandards of the .tear lean Sod Cross « 

P.B. 56 MESSS ^BB 13XBC19ZBS ft? BKAXSl SRBSASTOB BOB KLSHSEffiAKE & SBCOHBAKY SCBDOLS. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

faio causae will prepare the teaches for teachiEg health end hysiace la 
elementary aad saeoadary schools, 

B.B. 60 AB&IXSXS CP BHXSBH. Credit, 3. 

2 class hoars j 1 2<*fc©ur laboratory period. 

$Mt> course aiass to acaaaiafc the student with the analysis of rhyttesic 
structure of cassia and its application to sotor activity. It will also develop 
the skilXJTand progressions in rhytfcssic activities for use is the elementary and 
secondary schools. 

P.B. 70 Oi&S&KXMTIOB ABB MMimsmMim. 

3 class hoars. Credit, 3. 

Ttsis course conoidors the organisation ©£ the school systea, the role of 
_^he teacher, the necessary facilities and. the program in physical education. . 

JoE. 73 mssces &m bbibcxiues er pbsszcal bbdcatxor. 

3 class hoars. Credit, 3. 

Part I. BXBXOBQr 

This coarse alsss to help the student understand the principal lines of 
physical edneatiea by studying the development of physical education throughout 

the western twjrld. 



I 



p 



p 



/s 

37 



Fort ii. p&otihes. 

The study of the philosophical end scientific bases of teaching end learn- 
ing ao replied to physical education. The application of these principles to 
^specif ic problems. 



* 



P.E. SI AMSXIVS K3ISICM. EBaCttSXOH. 

3 doss hours. Credit, 3. 

A course to acquaint the student frith the problesi of exercise for persons 
«fc© are resferiatad physically. A study of types of handicaps and a development of 
activities which ere suitable and effective in various situations. Ssphasia will be 
pet on postural deviations, fcheir causes and correction. 

F.E. 96 SE&EMATL 

3 class hoars. Credit, 3. 

In addition to the consideration of specific topics, included in the oat- 
line below, this coarse will enable the students to exchange ideas regarding 
current probleas, trends and opportunities in physical education and its related 
fields. Discussions will be informal in nature, and it is hoped that professional 
leaders in varices areas of physical education will visit the class, thns affording 
students a first hand view of aasny si teat ions. 



i 



i 



I 



\ 



f 



The follorcicg Sabbatical Leaves ore secomBcaded subject So the usual conditions 
established by tke Board of Trustees: 



I 



Ksec; Dr. 8. H. Konigberg 

Title: Assistant Professor of geology 

To: School of Hygleitg and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 

.'Baltimore, Maryland 
Duration: Academic year 1958-59 at half pay 

Purpose: Br. Eonigberg plana Co continue the work he has been doing for 
• the last several years in the study of Trickcmonad parasites 
of tsan end other vertebrates, with special reference to the 
effects trhich these parasites have on their hosts. 

Kane: Dr. John E. Roberts 
Title: Associate Professor of Chemistry 
To: University of ^ashisgton or Iowa State University 
Duration: Acasfleafcc year 1958-59 at half pay 

Purpose: Br. Roberts proposes to conduct research dealing *&th fluorine 
chemistry or rare earth ekemisery. 

Rase: Dr. Robert B. Livingston 

Title: Professor of Botany 

To: • Bake University 

Duration: 2nd semester of academic year 1958*59 as full pay 

Purpose: The research problem of Dr. Livingston will deal with the 

seasonal variation in certain soil moisture values which have 
been designated as soil moisture constants. 

Base: Professor Sidney Ksplan 

Title: Assist ant Professor of English 

To: Harvard University 

Duration: Fall sesestcr 1958 at full pay 

Purpose: Mr. Kaplan plans to cosplcte-tkc remaining work on his Ph.D. 

dissertation. The subject of the dissertation is "The Theme 
of Miscegenation in American Life and Letters." 

Same: Dr. Helen F. Gallon 

Title: Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

To: One of the larger universities, probably University of Michigan 

Duration: Second semester of academic year 1958-59 at full pay 

Purpose: To cccplete a research problem in Topology and function theory. 

Name; Dr. William G. 0*0018x11 

Title: Professor of English 

To: She Huntington Liferary, Saa Marino, California 

Duration: Academic year 1958-59 at half pay 

Purpose: Dr. G*Bonsell *s research project is an outgrowth of a year of 

research in American literature at Harvard University' in 1952- 
53. It involves the study of a group of Kew England writers 
of the nineteenth end ^twentieth centuries. 



Kama: Dr. H. L. Varlcy 

Title: Professor of English 

To: Eokkaido Univorsi^ 

Juration: ,^tg$$it&; $$x$ i95S-59 at half pay 

Purpose: Dr. V&ricy will spend the year at Hokkaido University in Sapporo 
teaching. He aspects to handle three or four courses, one in 
American literature in general, one in the American novel, one 
on a particular figure* perhaps Esily Dickinson, and one in 
English language or conversation. 



i 



b 



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2163 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 




v< 


MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 




1 


April 8, 


1958, 11:00 a.m., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston 




COMMITTEE 




Chairman Brett presiding 






PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Taber, 

President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 






It 


was 






VOTED: 


To recommend that the Trustees approve an 
expenditure of $300 from the Trust Fund In- 
terest Account as partial cost for sending 
the Air Force ROTC Drill Team to Washington 
to compete in the National Drill Team 
Competition. 


Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 




It 


was 




I 


VOTED: 


To recommend that the Trustees allocate the 
income from the Hills Fund as follows: 
1/3 to the Department of Botany 
1/3 to the Department of Landscape Architecture 
1/3 to the Department of Horticulture 


Hills Fund 




It 


was 






VOTED: 


To recommend that the Trustees authorise ex- 
penditure of $6,500 from the Trust Fund In- 
terest Account for scholarships and financial 
aid to be awarded by the University Committee 
on Scholarships and Financial Aid and expendi- 
ture of $4,500 from the Trust Fund interest 
Account as grants in aid for candidates approved 
by the University Athletic Council and the Uni- 
versity Committee on Scholarship and Financial 
Aid. 


Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 




It 


was 




1 


VOTED: 


To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer to submit the following three stu- 
dent loans to the Attorney General for 
collection: 

Philip A. Bernard $40.00 
Arthur E. Gallant 40.00 
Edward Katz 150.00 


Student 
Loans 


1 


The committee reviewed the State Auditor's Report for 
the period ending June 30, 1957 and considered Treasurer Johnson's 


Auditor's 
Report 


• 


comments thereon, r.-rort is attached. 





2L64 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To thank the Treasurer for the time and 

thought given to the Auditor's recommenda- 
tion and for the steps taken as a result 
of these recommendations. 

The committee reviewed the present investments of the 
University and considered various proposals for the investment of 
$32,700 resulting from U. S. Savings Bonds which matured March 1, 
1958. The committee also considered the possibility of reinvesting 
$16,618 now in the Amherst Savings Bank and $15,000 now in the 
Ware Savings Bank. It was left that Chairman Brett would submit a 
written recommendation on investments before the Board meeting en 
April 21. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:30 p.m. 



ecretary 




April 7. 1958 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Coxnsaants of the University Treasurer oa the Stat© Auditor" a Report 
for the period of September **„ 1956 to June 30 » 1957 



In addition to the sosataenta contained herein e this report ia 
nade up of th© consss&nte of the University Controller the University 
Business Manager and the Director of the Student Union on those parts 
of the 3tate Auditor s Report for the period from Septesiber 4 1956 to 
June 30 o 1957 p «s relate to the activities for which th«y are responsible, 

It is noted that it appears to be the intention of the State 
Auditor to audit the University on a fiscal-year basis rather than from 
the date of the last audit to whatever date the auditors next arrive in 
the following year- This change to a fiscal«year basis will be much 
mora useful to the University as the audit report will correspond to the 
same period as the financial reports ©f the University., 

It ia noted that there are no serious discrepancies in this 
audit report. Most of the notes and comments relate to corrections of 
systems and procedures as recosnanded in prior reports, Action has been 
taken wherever possible to follow the additional suggestions of the 
State Auditor &s noted in the Report of the University Controller, 






e 

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April ?, 1958 

uaivsassff or massachusbxts 



Cuennimts ©f sfee University Controller on the Auditor's Report 
for the period Septeasbsr ftth, 1956 to June 30, 1957 



As requested, the following are ny remarks pertaining to the notes end 
Consents requiring explanation in this Report: 

Interna l Control : 

4o "Treasurer signs cheeks payable to himself". 

This practice had been us?rf for "clearing accounts" only. Sinse 
March I, 1957, whan ins true t ions wera issued to no laager make checks payable 
to "Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer" for elaaring-aeee^afe purposes, but to have 
such cheeks draws to the order of 'University of Massachusetts", I know of 
no single cheek, carrying your signature, mads payable to your order, other 
than your weekly payroll cheek. 

So "Leek of control over the operations of the University Store because 
of failure to essploy retail inventory method." 

In addition to the ©©©meats" of the Director of the Student Union on 
this item, it should be noted that the present accounting system for the Store 
makes it possible to mstk& a complete audit of this operation <> 

7e b. Certain credit msseraa&a are ©till not pre-nuabered. 



auditor is not specif le in Mo reference to "certain credit 
memoranda" and I do net knew, with any degree of certainty, to what credit 
memoranda he stakes reference,, Kwwot, ouk credit memoranda generally result 
in e refund being made by check. Sf this is the ease in this instance, 
our control would be exercised through the use of pra»suafeerad checks. 

7. So Meal tickets issued to attending coaf creases are still not pre- 

numbered. {Under scoring added). 

The use ®f the word "still" infers that this cctmeat was contained 
in the previous audit report. I can find no specific reference to this 
eoantent in the previous audit report. However, as Chairman of the Sub-Ceeaalttee 
on "Financial Reporting forms", by memorandum dated Hovestber 20, 1957, it was 
reeeanended to the Conventions Board that pre-ouabered forees be utilised for 
this purpose. 

8. "Lack of effective control over student incase." 

X believe that the controls established for the outstanding accounts, 
as a result of the flaal I.B.M. recapitulation, provides the necessary controls 
and permits the audit of these accounts without having to journalise these 



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entries. As you know, our eslsfclag procedures prohibit the altering ©f student 
bills without appropriate authority being Attached thereto. I am calling this 
■attar to Mr. Barrett's attention-. I see no need for pre-nuah&red credit aeao 
forms, as long as such fonss are properly authorised, since if such ferns result 
in refunds - which are roads by check, our control is exercised through the use 
of pre- numbered checks. 

9. "Ro reconcilement Bade by personnel in the Treasurer's Office of the 
deposits of the University Store and the Bearding Hall with caeh 
register tapes submitted with deposits." 

Although the recording of cash variations {between actual cash receipts 
and eseunts indicated by register readings} is, in ay opinion, primarily an 
operating function - to determine the efficiency of the cash register clerk, 
the test checking of such records is also an audit function. It is «y recow- 
aendatlon that the periodic checking of these records be part of the scope of 
the internal auditor's function. 

Records of cash variances ore feeing maintained at the operating units. 

10. "Absence of adequate records for housing reatale." 

See subsequent remarks under "Operation of Plant - Rentals". 



Financial Records: 

Separate cash books and general ledgers, for each fund group, are 
Justified when sore than one person is required to use any of these books at the 
save time. This situation has not prevailed la the past. As we Increase our 
pereonnel in the future, whereby it is required that raere than one person will 
be required to work ©a these records at the same time, we should then provide 
for separate books. We have procured binders for the general ledger, to peralt 
the separation of the general ledger at the time of the annual audit, when aora 
than one person is required to work on this booko 

Trust Fund Accounting ; 

2. Recognised Student Organisations ; 

Aa you know, this Office aaiataias only a control account for Recognised 
Student Organisations and, therefore, would be unable to verify individual 
organisation balances with these organisations based on the records of this 
Office even though this procedure was domed necessary or desirable. By providing 
a copy of the annual report to every mouther organisation, provision is thereby 
aade for such aeaber organisations to verify their records against the records 
of the Recognised Studeat Organisation Office. Furthermore, aaosber organisations 
are required to turn over their books to the R.S.O. Office, at the close of eech 
semester, for the purpose of reviewing such records to determine that they are in 
agr e em en t with the records maintained by the 1. S. 0. Office. 



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Operation of Plant - Ran tola ; 

Ha are maintaining the records required by the State Comptroller. 
I believe that these records, properly maintained, provide for adequate 
Internal control and permit the auditor to verify rental receipts against 
tbe potential income frca this source. In fact, the auditor, by his own 
coameate, indicates that these receipts can be verified against rentals 
due, but that a "prohibitive" anount of tis&e would bo required. I believe 
that this verification could be perforated within a reasonable ttea; further- 
more, I do not believe that ure should necessarily design or maintain our 
accounting records for ease of audit. 

The auditor's recoaroend&tion would require additional bookkeeping 
personnel which would not Improve our collections control since under our 
system personnel other than the bookkeepers are responsible for the 
collections. 

Inventory of Physical Property; 

It is my understanding that changes of property occurring during 
the fiscal year are now being entered In the property records. Correspondence 
with the State Ceoptrollci* indicates thee perpetual inventories are not 
required . 



1 



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April 7. 1958 

mwrnsTH or massacsositts 






1 Ceeaente of the University Busiases Manager on the Auditor's Report 

for tho period September 4th e 1956 to Jane 30, 1957 



I 



1. All meal tickets are pro-numbered. When a student pays for his 
board an IBM card is sent to Boarding Rail,, The steal ticket la issued 
to the student on the basis of this £BS2 card and the ticket number 
recorded thareoao The auditor can then check to determine If any extra 
tickets have been issued. Our internal auditor, when employed, can also 
cheek this periodically. 

2. Separate tickets hove been ordered for susansr session — different 
color and Gesture than regular sessions. Since ail tickets are pre- 
numbered and a control is maintained of the numbers, this is really 
superfluous. 

3. We have no answer or solution to the problem of employee steal 
tickets. When an employee takes a plate and sits down to eat wo demand 
a ticket. We can not force esployses to eat regular seals if they do 
not wish to, nor can we police every esove an employeo stakes. Attached 
le a notice personally handed to each employee. 

4. We have tired to eliminate students eating at one unit when 
assigned to another because of limited time between classes. Mot nore 
than ten students now have that privilege. Another exception Is members 
of athletic tefflss who roust have an early evening meal. All these 
exceptions eat in line #3, end ere identified in advance. 

5. An actual count Is nedo of all persons eating each meel. At 
tines we receive payment for more wheals than those actually served. This 
■ay be because of guaranteed number, or tickets sold to individuals who 
do net appear. 

6. The matter of serially numbered tickets for conventions and 
conferences is a matter for the Conventions Committee. 

7. The refund is mads only after the ticket is turned In. 

The Treasurer's Office does submit a listing of ell board payment 
refunds. The number of the cancelled ticket is now blotted out on check- 
off lists. 



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NOTICE 
ALL BOARDING HALL EMPLOYEES 

BEGINNING IMMEDIATELY, ANY EMPLOYEE TAKING A HSAL AT ANY BOARDING 
UNIT IS REQUIRED TO GIVE A „30* BLUE TICKET. ANY EMPLOYEE TAKING 
A MEAL AND NOT HAVING A BLUE TICKET IS EXPECTED TO PAY THE REGULAR 
CASH PRICE. (THERE ARE NO EXCEPTIONS.) 

THE PRIVILEGE OF USING THE o 30«f BLUE TICKET IS EXTENDED TO ALL 
REGULAR EMPLOYEES OF BOARDING HALLS ONLY. 

TICKETS MAY BE PURCHASED AT TREASURER'S OFFICE — TEN TICKETS FOR 
$3.00. FOR RECORD KEEPING PURPOSES, PURCHASE SHOUID BE MADE BY 
THE INDIVIDUAL. 

IN ORDER TO SPEED UP OUR CAFETERIA LINE SERVICE, ALL EMPLOYEES WHO 
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE ABOVE ARE EXPECTED TO HAVE THEIR MEALS BEFORE 
OPENING OR CLOSING OF SERVING LINES. ' BREAKS FOR COFFEE OR SMOKES, 
ETC. . MUST BE CONFINED TO MID-MORNING OR MID-AFTERNCON, AND NOT 
DURING THE TIME SERVING LINES ARE OPEN. 

"YOUR CO-OPERATION WILL BE GREATLY APPRECIATED." 



'I 



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April 7, 1938 

mirasm of sjASSAGiisssrra 



Comments of the Student Union Director on the Auditor's Report 
for the period SepeeEber^tb, 1956 to June 30, 1957 



Seeeatly Kr. Taylor ashed us If we would care to make any comments 
on the State Auditor's Report on the IQsras that concerned the Student 
Onion Building' 

Certainly X feel quite proud that the Union was able to come up 
with a standard of financial procedure that was acceptable, as appeared 
to he during the first year of operation. Wash credit for this goes to 
our bookkeepers, Mr. Bask, and to the excellent help from your office. 
A few Items that were nsentlonad by the auditors which seem to call for 
comments will be as follows: 

On Page 16, Item #5 - "Lack of control over the operations 

of the University Store because of failure to 
employ retail inventory method." 

In discussing this comment, &9r. lyaa, Mr. Buck and myself felt that, 
In planning for the protection of the Store inventory , the control depends on 
the physical layout, routing of traffic, location of cash registers and general 
supervision by Store Manager, rather than a complicated retail inventory method. 
At present, physical inventories and cost of sales comparisons are prepared 
every 6 months with the daea of the past several years on hand for reference 
purposes. There has been no real doubt in our minds eoncarnlng loss over and 
above a nominal amount. 

On Page 17, Itesa #7 - "Certain memoranda forms are not pra-auaborcd." 

a. Time charge slips used at the Student Union 
games room are still not pre-huahered. 

He certainly question the use of the word still, since this item 
could not have appeared in any previous audit. But in compliance with this 
notification, the time charge slips, which are used for control of billiards, 
are now pre-numbered and chocked dally. 

On Page 25, Paragraph 3 - Student Union Food Service Fund. 

In considering the suggestion by the auditor, whereby china and 
silver would be capitalised, we are well aware that this is practiced in 
varying degree in commercial restaurants, usually over a relatively short 
duration. However, in setting up the Union Food Service Area, we did not 
feel that we were . pressured by either a tax or asset statement. We chose 
to continue the approved method, used in the past, by the University Store, 
whereby such expenditures were charged directly to expenses. 



II 



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COMMITTEE 



1 



2165 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE 
April 17, 1958, 10:30 a.m., Stockbridge Hall, U of M, Amherst 

Chairman Brown presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Brown, Crowley, McNamara, 
President Mather, Secretary Burke 
and by invitation of the committee 
Messrs. Sieling, Jeffrey, Dayton 
and Allan of the College of Agri- 
culture and Messrs. Gillespie and 
Harris representing the Bureau of 
Government Research 

( Agenda No. Ill) 

At President Mather's request Messrs. Gillespie and 

Harris presented the Bureau of Government Research study of "the 

Structure Organization and Administrative Relationships of the 

Massachusetts Extension Service." Dean Sieling explained that this 

study had been undertaken by the Bureau of Government Research at 

the request of the Director of the Extension Service. The study 

was financed by Extension Service funds. 

Following the presentation by Drs. Gillespie and Harris 

and the ensuing discussion and on the recommendation of Dean Sieling 

and President Mather, the committee 

VOTED : To approve in principle the major recommenda- 
tion of the study and to request a report of 
the second study on "Extension Program 
Organization and Operation" when completed. 

( Agenda No. IV ) 

Dean Sieling reported on 

1. Control Service income and costs for the 
year ending June 30, 1957. 

2. The difference between estimated wholesale 
market value of produce and income from 
produce accruing to the credit of the 
College of Agriculture. 



Bureau of 

Government 

Research 

Study of 

Extension 

Service 



Income from 
Services and 
Sales - 
review of 



2166 



COMMITTEE 



College of 
Agriculture 

Organizat ional 
Changes 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3. Examples of misleading identification of 
expenditures of the Experiment Station 
and Extension Service programs which 
lead to problems in: 

a. Qualifying state funds as eligible 
offset for federal funds. 

b. Accurately determining the cost of 
Instruction in the College of Agri- 
culture. 

c. Inflating the apparent cost of the 
College of Agriculture to the 
Commonwealth. 

d. Establishing eligibility for maxi- 
mum benefits from Federal legislation 
in which funds are appropriated in 
support of existing programs or for 
capital outlay. 

Following discussion the committee 

VOTED : That the University Administration make 
every effort to identify expenditures in 
Experiment Station and Extension programs 
so that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
will be eligible for maximum benefits from 
any Federal legislation in which funds are 
appropriated for support of these programs 
or for capital outlay. 

( Agenda No. I) 

Dean Sieling reviewed the organizational changes that 

have been made in the College of Agriculture since 1950 and 
stressed those that had occurred since the July 1, 1954 reorganiza- 
tion of the College of Agriculture. The integrated program has 
resulted, he said, in improved and expanded service without a 
corresponding increase in manpower. Some of the major changes are: 

1. Established Agricultural Communications De- 
partment. 

2. Combined Dairy Industry and Animal Husbandry 
into a Dairy and Animal Science Department. 

3. Combined Floriculture, Olericulture and Pomology 
into a Horticulture Department. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

4. Combined Entomology, Plant Pathology, Seed 
Laboratory, Arboriculture, and Shade Tree 
Laboratory into a Department of Entomology 
and Plant Pathology. 

5. Established College of Agriculture Business 
Office. 

6. Combined Instruction and Research Farms into 

a Department of Research and Production Service. 

Dean Sieling further pointed out that the integrated pro- 
gram had not been completed at the administrative level. Under 
the present system the Director of Extension was independent of 
the Dean of the College of Agriculture in so far as the use of 
federal funds and relations with the County Extension Service and 
the Federal Extension Service are concerned. This system, said 
the Dean, had worked admirably during the tenure of James W. Dayton 
as Director of the Extension Service but since Director Dayton had 
announced his intention to retire as of June 30, 1958, he, the 
Dean, was requesting that such cooperation be made mandatory rather 
than optional. 

President Mather supported Dean Sieling' s proposal by 
indicating that this was precisely his primary recommendation to 
the Japanese in the present University of Massachusetts - Univer- 
sity of Hokkaido exchange program for carrying out their Extension 
program. Following discussion, the committee 

VOTED : That the University Administration bring 
to the Agricultural Committee before 
July 1, 1958 a recommendation for comple- 
tion of the reorganization of the College 
of Agriculture at the administrative level. 

Dean Sieling presented a chronological listing of the 

program and service development of the College of Agriculture. 

This, he stated, clearly shows that basically the College of 



2167 



2168 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Agriculture services are rendered to the food industry which in- 
cludes food production, food processing, food distribution and the 
food service industry. In the discussion that followed it was 
generally agreed that the public concept of the term agriculture 
is generally limited to the area of agricultural production; that 
the students think of agriculture as a study of the husbandries; 
and, that the cost of the total program is generally considered 
as the cost of supporting the agricultural production segment of 
the food industry. It was 

VOTED : To review the title "College of Agriculture" 
in view of present and future services and 
functions of this unit of the University. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



■^K_ 



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Donald P. Allan, Acting as Secretary 
in the absence of Mr. Burke 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

July 18, 1958, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M 

Chairman Whitmore, presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Brett, Haigis, Taber, 
Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 

The committee invited Mr. Niels H. Larsen, Architect, 
and Mr. Harry S. Hugill, Construction & Maintenance Engineer, to 
attend the meeting. Mr. Louis W. Ross was also invited to attend 
that portion of the meeting concerning the dormitories. 

The committee inspected plans for various buildings, 

inspected certain completed projects and discussed the building 

plans with President Mather, Mr. Larsen, Mr. Johnson and Mr. Hugill 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the following preliminary plans: 

U-57-1 Science Center - third section, Desmond 
& Lord, architect, approved subject to 
minor changes. 

U-58-2 Education Building - Desmond & Lord, 

architect, approved as to general arrange- 
ment but with the request that the 
architect restudy the west face of the 
building and submit new plans for this 
face and subject to other corrections as 
shown on the plans. 

U-58-4 Infirmary - Thomas A. Kirley, architect 

U-59-1 Dining Commons Addition - Kilham, Hopkins, 
Greeley & Brodie, architect 

U-58-5 Engineering Shops - John Guarino, architect 

U-58-6 Cold Storage Building - S. S. Eisenberg, 
architect 



2169 



Science 
Center 



Education 
Building 



Infirmary 

Dining Commons 
Addition 

Engineering Shope 

Cold Storage 
Building 



2170 



COMMITTEE 



Dormitories 
#16 and #17 



Engineering 
Campus 



Maintenance 
Building 



Physical 
Education 
Playing 
Fields 



Science Center 
Steam Lines 



Sanitary Sewer 
Dormitory 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dormitories - #16 and #17 for women including 
their location opposite Leach and Crabtree as 
shown on the plans of Louis W. Ross. 

Men's Dormitory group - layouts and design in- 
cluding location west of Kappa Sigma subject to 
minor adjustments for grades - Louis W. Ross, 
architect. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the development of the Engineer- 
ing campus with parking areas and other site 
developments within the scope of a general 
plan presented to the meeting. 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve final plans for the Maintenance 
Building, U-58-1 as prepared by Maloney & 
Tessier. 

It was 

VOTED : To award a contract for Grading and Improve- 
ment of Certain Land for Physical Education 
Playing Fields - Item 8258-37 - to Eastern 
Tree and Landscaping Corporation of Dedham, 
the low bidder, for $150,123.81. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the following projects subject to 
completion of certain minor details to the 
satisfaction of the Treasurer: 

1. Public Health Building - U-301 

0. D. Purington Co. 

2. Steam Distribution - Contr. #9 

Hartwell Co. , Inc. 

3. Sanitary Sewer, Storm Drains, and 
Water Distribution, Contr. #6 

Warner Bros. , Inc. 

4. Dormitory #15 - Louis W. Ross, architect. 

Treasurer Johnson reported progress on land acquisition 
under the $150,000 legislative appropriation for the purchase of 
additional farm land. 



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COMMITTEE 



2171 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer also presented the attached progress re- 
port on current building projects. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:15 p.m. 



1 



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Secretary 



2172 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE roMMTTTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

September 9, 1958, 11:00 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Miss Buxton 
Kiernan, Mis<? Schuck, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Dr. McCune, 
Dr. Salwak 

In the absence of Mr. Burke, the Chairman requested 
Treasurer Johnson to record the minutes . 

The Chairman asked Dr. Shannon McCune, Provost of the 
University, and Dr. Stanley Salwak, Assistant to the Provost, to 
join the meeting. 

President Mather presented appointments, promotions, 
merit increases and other personnel actions for consideration of 
the committee. In explaining the policy under which the Univer- 
sity operates, the President stated that there had been established 
a working understanding between the Budget Commission, appropriat- 
ing committees of the Legislature, and the University staff in im- 
plementation of the provisions of Chapter 556, the Acts of 1956, 
which permitted the use of available appropriated funds for the 
making of merit increases and promotions above the minimum of the 
salary group for each classified position. Each year it is 
recognized that certain funds will be surplus to fixed payroll 
needs through accruals from turnovers, vacant positions, resigna- 
tions, etc. These funds are carefully calculated and become 
available for merit increases and appointments above minimum. 



2173 



Personnel 
Actions 



2L74 



COMMITTEE 



New 
Courses 



Landscape 
Architecture 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Bartlett pointed out that it was the Trustees 
responsibility under Chapter 556 to make certain that persons 
appointed above the minimum met the qualifications as prescribed 
in the statute. 

The committee examined the list of personnel actions in 

detail with President Mather and Provost McCune answering many 

questions. After further discussion and explanations and on 

recommendation of the President and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they make the appointments, pro- 
motions, merit increases, an' 1 other 
personnel actions included in the list 
entitled Schedule A which is attached 
to these minutes and hereby made a part 
of these minutes. 

President Mather presented detailed changes in course 

of study and revisions of the curriculum which were discussed in 

detail by the committee. On recommendation of the President and 

on motions duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the adoption of the new courses as con- 
tained in Schedule B attached to these 
minutes which is hereby made a part of 
these minutes. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the adoption of the revised curriculum 
in Landscape Architecture as contained 
in Schedule C which is attached to 
these minutes and is hereby made a part 
of these minutes. 



I 



I 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



!1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

V OTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the adoption of the new courses in the 
Graduate School as contained in 
Schedule D of these minutes which is 
hereby made part of these minutes. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the adoption of the Ph.D. degree pro- 
gram in Poultry Science as part of the 
Graduate School offerings of the Uni- 
versity as contained in Schedule E of 
these minutes which is hereby made part 
of these minutes. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 



2L75 



New 
Courses 



Poultry 
Science 




I 



2L76 



COMMITTEE 



Stocks 

and 

Bonds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
October 7, 1958, 10:45 a.m., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston 

Chairman Brett presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Brett, Cashin, Taber, 
President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson 

The committee reviewed the current security holdings and 

noted that there was $40,838.60 available in uninvested cash and 

funds in savings banks. It was the consensus of opinion that the 

money in the savings banks could be put to better use by investing 

it so as to obtain a higher yield. On motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
sale of 15 shares, common stock, of the 
Northern Illinois Gas Company. 

And it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 
buy the following securities: 

Bonds 



I 



10,000 Florida Power & Light Co. 

4 3/8-86 
10,000 Public Service Electric & 

Gas 4 5/8-88 



100 American Tobacco Co. 
100 J. C. Penney Co. 



Approximate Price 

97 

100% 

Common Stock 

Approximate Price 
90% 
98^ 



Yield 
4.56 
4.60 

Yield 
5.5 
4.3 



» 



The meeting adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




etary 
pro tern 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

October 10, 1958, 3:00 p.m., President's Office, U of M 

Chairman Whitmore, presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Taber, Whitmore, Haigis, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson 

Chairman Whitmore noted that the House had passed the 

capital outlay bill recommended by the Governor containing an 

amount of $12,868,000 for the University. Whereas this bill is 

yet to pass the Senate, it was desirable for the Trustees at this 

time to approve the sites for the seven new projects and to 

recommend to the Commission on Administration and Finance the 

appointment of architects for each new building. In addition to 

the seven new projects, funds for construction are provided in the 

bill for eight buildings on which plans are already being prepared. 

These are: 

1. School of Education and Laboratory Practice School 

2. Science Center - third and fourth sections 

3. Infirmary 

4. Addition to Power Plant and Utility Systems 

5. Engineering and Physics Shops 

6. Dining Commons addition 

7. General Maintenance Building 

8. Cold Storage Laboratory 

The committee reviewed the sites established on the 

Master Plan for each project and on motion duly made and seconded, 

it was 

VOTED : To approve the sites shown on the Master 
Plan for the following buildings: 

1. Science Center (fourth section) 

2. Physical Education Building for Men 

3. Addition to Food Technology Building 

4. Addition to Physics Building 



2L77 



Capital 
Outlay 



Master 
Plan 



2L78 



COMMITTEE 



Natural 
Resources 
Classroom and 
Laboratory 



Engineering 
Building 



Service 
Building for 
Experiment 
Station 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson explained that there were two possible 

locations on the Master Plan for the Natural Resources Classroom 

and Laboratory building. After discussing the pros and cons of 

both sites and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To designate the site shown on the Master 
Plan west of Stockbridge Hall and at the 
eastern end of the new mall for the College 
of Agriculture campus as the site for the 
Natural Resources Classroom and Laboratory 
Building. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that an addition to the main 
Engineering Building is shown on the Master Plan as a wing extending 
to the east. Studies that have been made by the Department of Land- 
scape Architecture and the University Construction and Maintenance 
Engineer indicate that it may be desirable, on further architectural 
studies to be made by the architect selected for this project, to 
modify the Master Plan in the exact location of the Engineering 
Building to be built next. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To locate the next Engineering Building in 

the quadrangle formed by the Engineering and 
Chemistry buildings with the exact location 
in the quadrangle to be determined by further 
architectural studies to be made by the 
architect selected for the project in 
cooperation with the School of Engineering, 
Campus Planning Council and Construction 
Maintenance Engineer. 

It was 

VOTED : To locate the Service Building for the Ex- 
periment Station in the area of the Brooks 
Farm in the location shown on the Master 
Plan for the new farm buildings. 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that the Master Plan con- 
tained two buildings for the School of Business Administration. At 
the present time the only land that is free is that to the east of 
Alumni Field in back of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity house. On 



P 



1 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



motion duly made and seconded, it was 
VOTED 



To locate the Classroom and Office Building 
for the School of Business Administration 
east of Alumni Field and west of Phi Sigma 
Kappa fraternity. 



The committee spent a great deal of time reviewing lists 
of architects for the new projects based on their qualifications 
and experience and, for those that had already done work for the 
University, their performance and the quality of their services. 
It was the consensus of opinion that only the most outstanding 
architects in the Commonwealth with proven records of experience 
on large projects should be selected. A great deal of attention 
was given to the qualifications of each designer for the type of 
building under consideration to make certain that they were quali- 
fied for the assignment. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following list of architects in order 
of priority as listed for each project be 
recommended to the Commission on Administra- 
tion and Finance for appointment with 
preference being given to the number one 
choice of the Trustees. 

Physical Education Building for Men 

1. Morris W. Maloney & Henry J. Tessier, Associated 

Architects 
220 Dwight Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

2. Shepley, Bulf inch, Richardson & Abbott 
Ames Building, Boston, Massachusetts 

3. James A. Britton 

315 Federal Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Natural Resources Classroom & Laboratory Building 

1. James A. Britton 

315 Federal Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

2. Walter Gaffney Assoc. Inc. 

60 West Main Street, Hyannis, Massachusetts 

3. Clinton Foster Goodwin 

25 Washington Square, Haverhill, Massachusetts 



2L79 



Business 
Adminis t rat ion 
Building 



Architects 



2180 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Science Center - Fourth Section 

1. James H. Ritchie & Associates 
135 Clarendon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. Leland, Larsen, Bradley and Hibbard 
711 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

3. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 
Ames Building, Boston, Massachusetts 

Addition to Food Technology Building 

1. Harold C. Knight Associates 
73 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. Clinton Foster Goodwin 
25 Washington Square, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

3. Morris W. Maloney & Henry J. Tessier, Associated 

Architects 
220 Dwight Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Addition to Physics Building 

1. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 
Ames Building, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. James H. Ritchie & Associates 
135 Clarendon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

3. Harold C. Knight Associates 
73 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Classrooms and Offices, School of Business Administration 

1. Campbell and Aldrich 
38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. Maginnis & Walsh & Kennedy 
126 Newbury Street, Boston 16, Massachusetts 

3. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 
Ames Building, Boston, Massachusetts 

Engineering Building and Service Building for Experiment Station 



1. Leland, Larsen, Bradley and Hibbard 
711 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. Smith and Sellew 

283 Dartmouth Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

3. Harold C. Knight Associates 

73 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Improvements and Additions to the Power Plant and Utility 
Systems 

Merrill Associates - Power Plant, Steam and Electric 

210 South Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Whitman and Howard, Inc. - Water, Drainage & Sewers 
89 Broad Street, Boston 10, Massachusetts 

The appropriation bill for Capital Outlay contains in its 

House version an item of $14,000 for the purchase of the turkey test 

center that is located adjacent to the Tillson Poultry Farm. This 



P 



f 



COMMITTEE 



2L81 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

consists of a two-story building and five acres of land on which 

it is located. This appropriation item requires that an independent 

appraisal of the property be made by a qualified and disinterested 

appraiser before it is purchased. Mr. Selwyn H. Graham is 

presently retained by the Trustees as appraiser and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Mr. Selwyn H. Graham of Burlington, Massa- 
chusetts be retained as an appraiser to 
appraise the chicken and turkey broiler 
test property. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that an electric distribution 

contract had been completed in a satisfactory condition in 

accordance with the plans and specifications and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of Massachusetts State Contract 
U-702 - Contract #10 - addition to the 
Electric Distribution System - Reynolds 
Brothers Inc. contractor - as having been 
completed in accordance with the plans and 
specifications . 

The committee received from the President a report of the 

faculty Board for Naming Buildings. The committee reviewed these 

recommendations and after discussion and on recommendation of the 

President, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the following buildings be named as indicated: 

Dormitory 15 - Wheeler House in honor of the late 
William Wheeler who served as a Trustee of the Uni- 
versity from 1880 to 1928 and who served as Chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees from 1926 to 1928, a 
graduate of the Class of 1871, Professor of 
Mathematics and Civil Engineering at his alma mater 
and Acting President and President of Hokkaido 
University from 1877 to 1880. In 1929 he was 
awarded an honorary degree from Massachusetts State 
College (LL.D.). 



Turkey 

Test 

Center 



Electric 

Distribution 

System 



Wheeler 
House 



2182 



Lincoln 
Gardens 

COMMITTEE 

Liberal Arts 
Building 

Justin S. 
Morrill 
Science Center 



Lemuel 

Shattuck 

Auditorium 



Women's 
Physical 
Education 
Building 



Nathaniel 
Bowditch Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Faculty "Married Student Apartments - Lincoln Gardens , 
since these buildings are located on Lincoln Avenue. 

Liberal Arts Building - Joesph Warren Bart let t Hall 
in honor of the Chairman of the Board of Trustees 

Science Center - Justin S. Morrill Science Center 
in recognition of the Senator from Vermont who 
sponsored the land grant college legislation in 
Congress and who was recognized for his policy 
statements in support of public higher education 
made on this campus. 

Auditorium in the Public Health Building - Lemuel 
Shattuck Auditorium in recognition of the pioneer- 
ing contributions to the development of public 
health doctrine and administration of Lemuel 
Shattuck 

Women's Physical Education Building - to be designated 
The Women's Physical Education Building until such 
time as a suitable name is available. 

Trustee Brett recommended that a major building should 
be named for Nathaniel Bowditch, a Trustee from 1896 to 1945 and 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees from 1934 to 1945. President 
Mather indicated that the Vegetable Gardening Building and Green- 
house was the first unit of a large Plant Science Building and that 
this would be a suitable building to honor Mr. Bowditch' s memory 
in addition to the small Bowditch 4-H Club building that already 
bears his name. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Plant Science Building including the 
Vegetable Gardening building now under con- 
struction be named Nathaniel Bowditch Hall. 

The committee made a detailed inspection of the newly 

completed Women's Physical Education Building. On motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 



f 



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f 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Women's Physical Education Building, 
Massachusetts State Project U-603 - M. J. 
Walsh & Sons, contractor, be accepted sub- 
ject to correction of minor items contained 
on the list in the hands of the Treasurer 
within the contract period of one year as 
provided for in the contract. 

The meeting adjourned at 5:55 p.m. 




2L83 



Womer ' s 
Physical 
Education 
Building 



2184 



COMMITTEE 



Vincent 

Goldthwait 
Student 
Loan Fund 



Endowment 
Fund 



Bonds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
February 13, 1959, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M 
Chairman Brett presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Brett, Cashin, Taber, 
President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Gillespie 

The committee reviewed the State Auditor's report. 
Treasurer Johnson explained that the report was not critical and 
the comments were minor ones. The points of disagreement were 
merely differences in techniques. 

The committee reviewed the list of securities in the 
Endowment Funds. No changes were recommended at this time. 

The committee discussed the gift of Dr. Joel E. Goldthwaij: 

and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the gift of Dr. Joel E. 
Goldthwait, Class of 1885, of 47 shares 
DuPont stock and $118.25 cash making a 
total of $10,000 to be added to the Vincent 
Goldthwait Student Loan Fund. 

The committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
transfer of 47 shares common stock of E. I. 
DuPont de Nemours Co. from the Vincent 
Goldthwait Student Loan Fund to the Endow- 
ment Fund portfolio at 210% using $9,881.75 
from the Amherst Savings Bank account. 

The committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees pur- 
chase of 15,000 high grade bonds with re- 
maining $17,601.75 from savings banks and 
uninvested cash as follows: 



P 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



10,000 
5,000 

5,000 



AA Commonwealth Edison 4 5/8 - 
2009 (5 yr. non-ref.) @ 102 - 
yield 4.53. 

AA Southern Natural Gas 4 3/4- 
1979 (5 yr. non-ref.) <a 103.75 - 
yield 4.45 

or 
AA Public Service of Indiana 4% 
1989 - yield approximately 4.50. 



It was 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the use of any funds that may be 
received from the Federal Government as 
matching funds for Graduate Fellowships 
under the National Defense Education Act 
of 1958 for the furtherance of the Graduate 
School program including the awarding of 
additional fellowships. 

And it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the Treasurer to place in 
savings banks balances of funds not re- 
quired for current operations from the 
Recognized Student Organizations Funds, 
the Athletic Trust Fund, and the Student 
Union Reserve Fund and to credit the 
respective funds so deposited the interest 
earned thereon. 

The report of the Treasurer "Your State University Reports!" 

was discussed and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the Treasurer to pay the 
publication cost of "Your State University 
Reports" from the Research Trust Fund 
Overhead account. 



The meeting adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 




Secretary 



2185 



Graduate 
Fellowships 

National 
Defense 
Education Act 



RSO Funds, 
Athletic Trust 
Fund, Student 
Union Reserve 
Fund 



Research 
Trust Fund 



__£ 






1 — *- 

2L86 


■ 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 




P 


COMMITTEE 


February 13, 1959, 12:30 p.m., University of Massachusetts 


1 




Chairman Whitmore, presiding 








PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Haigis, Taber, 
Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Gillespie 








The committee discussed the land acquisition program of 








the University. Because the relocation of Route 116, a limited 








access highway, will bisect the area originally planned for purchase 


& 






as farm land, the College of Agriculture is recommending the pur- 








chase of farm land removed from the campus for the farm operations 








including future farm buildings. The committee favored this plan 




■ 




and awaits specific recommendation for the purchase of land. 




r 




Mr. Hugill, Construction and Maintenance Engineer, re- 








ported on projects under construction. See Attachment A. Weight 








tests are being made on a roof section of the Liberal Arts Building, 








It is expected that the roof will pass the test. Most jobs are on 








schedule and those that are delayed will not cause undue in- 








convenience to the University. 








The committee reviewed final plans and specifications of 








new buildings soon to be constructed. It was 






Dormitories 
18 & 19 


VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve final plans of Dormitories 
#18 and #19. 








It was 




■ 


School of 
Education 
Building 

1 


VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the plans of the School of 
Education and Laboratory Practice School 
subject to the corrections on the plans. 




i 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the plans of the Cold Storage 
Building subject to corrections. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they approve the plans of the Infirmary sub- 
ject to the corrections on the final plans. 

The committee discussed the future enrollment of the 

University and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they authorize dormitories to be constructed 
by the University of Massachusetts Building 
Association to house approximately 950 stu- 
dents (350 women and 600 men) to be completed 
by September 1, 1960. They are to be located 
(1) in back of Dormitory #19, (2) north of 
Wheeler House (3) south of the Dining Commons. 

The committee discussed the Capital Outlay Program and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

adoption of the 1960-61 program as listed 
in Attachment B and to consider the 1962, 
1963, 1964 and 1965 projects, as amended, 
as part of the projected five-year program. 

The committee considered the feasibility of having the 

county abandon Eastman Lane and North Hadley Road which traverse 

the campus. It was 

VOTED : To direct Treasurer Johnson to explore the 
status of Eastman Lane and North Hadley 
Road in case the Board of Trustees seeks 
to have them abandoned to the University. 

The United States Post Office Department is interested 

in establishing a branch post office on the campus. It was 

VOTED : To have Treasurer Johnson explore the 

feasibility of establishing a post office 
on the campus. 

The committee inspected completed projects and 



2L87 



Cold Storage 
Building 



Infirmary 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Building 
Association 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Eastman Lane 

and 
No. Hadley Road 



Post Office 



2L88 



COMMITTEE 



Contracts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
acceptance of 

U-702 - Contract #12 - Addition to Steam 
Distribution System, Hartwell Co. 
January 28, 1959. 

U-602 - Addition to Chemistry Building, 
M. S. Kelliher Co. 

U-702 - Contract #8 - Coal & Ash Handling 
Equipment, Win. T. Donovan Co. 
January 29, 1959. 

U-702 - Contract #4 - Boiler - Union Iron 
Works - substantially completed. 

U-702 - Contract #7 - Addition to Boiler 
Plant - John Capobianco - sub- 
stantially completed. 

U-805 - Vegetable Gardening Building and 

Greenhouse - D. A. Sullivan & Sons, 

The meeting adjourned at 5:00 p.m. 



P 




Secretary 



r 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1960 

D.B.C. 
Item 
No.* 

85 Science Center, Section 4 $Z,500,000 

86 Plans - Men's Physical Education Building 138,000 

87 Utilities Expansion 400,000 

88 Natural Resources Building 1,000,000 

89 Food Technology Building Addition 900,000 

90 Physics Building Addition 2,000,000 

91 Classrooms, Offices - School of Business 1,260,000 

Administration 

92 Poultry Plant and Laboratory Building 250,000 

93 Engineering Building 1,500,000 

97 Plans for Dining Common (new) 75,000 

98 Dining Commons, Addition 500,000 
Plans - Fine Arts Building** 100,000 



Total $10,623,000 



*Recommended by the Division of Building Construction. 

**To be added to the recommendations of the Division 
of Building Construction. 



Feb. 10, 1959 



r 



r 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -2- 



1962 



1. Administration Building $2,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

2. Animal Science Building 2,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

3. Assembly Hall & Field House 3,000,000 

Including furnishings, equipment, 
and site development 

4. Additions to Utilities - Steam, Electric 200,000 

Water, and Sewer 

5. Plans for Classroom Building 75,000 

6. Plans for Plant Science Building 83,000 

Including greenhouses 

7. Plans for Engineering Laboratories 100,000 

8. Coal Storage Facilities, including 500,000 

railsiding, equipment, and 
equipment building 

9. Engineering Study of Generating Electricity 10,000 



Total - 1962 $7,968,000 



* *l 



' "" -"W ,<.'■ 



I 



'(!.", 



I 



I 



I 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 



I 



1963 



1. Classroom Building $1,500,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

2. Plant Science Building & Greenhouses 1,650,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

3. Engineering Laboratories 2,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

4. Addition to Utilities - Steam, Electric, 200,000 

Water, and Sewer 

5. Plans for Addition to Library 100,000 

6. Addition to ROTC Federal Funds 

7. Plans for Graduate Science Research Laboratory 150,000 

8. Athletic Facilities and Fields 500,000 

Including site development, grading, 
drainage, paving, seeding, field 
structures and equipment 



Total - 1963 $6,100,000 






r r ■ '• ■ i I 



P 



! 



! 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -5- 



I 



1 



I 



1965 



1. Auditorium $3,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 



2. Classroom Building 1,500,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 



3. Agricultural and Farm Buildings 1,000,000 

Including equipment 



4. Educational Radio and TV Facilities 750,000 

for instruction and research 

Including furnishings, equipment, 
and radio towers, etc. 



5. Addition to Utilities 200,000 



6. Plans for Addition to Women's Physical Education 30,000 
Building 



7. Plans for Addition to Home Economics Building 50,000 



8. Plans for Cranberry Station Laboratories 20,000 

and Offices (East Wareham) 



Total - 1965 $6,550,000 



GRAND TOTAL - 1961-1965 $33,387,000 



. 



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1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

March 13, 1959, 11:00 a.m., President's Office, U of M, Amherst 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Haigis, Miss Schuck, 
President Mather, Provost McCune, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Gillespie 

The Chairman asked Provost McCune to join the meeting. 

Provost McCune described the means by which the Univer- 
sity attempts to obtain effective coordination among the academic 
elements on the campus. Semi-monthly meetings of the Deans at a 
luncheon are an informal approach. A formalized meeting of the 
Provost's Administrative Council, composed of Deans and Directors, 
considers and decides policy matters; and the Student Personnel 
Administrative Council, consisting of all student personnel offi- 
cers, discusses related problems. The Faculty Senate, made up of 
administrative officers and elected representatives from the 
colleges, schools and divisions, meets once a month to take action 
on questions and problems that are presented to it. There is also 
a University Course of Study Committee and a Graduate School 
Council that makes recommendations in their respective areas. 
The University is in the process of developing a Graduate School 
faculty chosen on a selective basis from the regular faculty. 
This is keeping with other activities of the University program 
in developing the University as the public graduate center in 
Massachusetts. 

The Provost described economies being practiced through 
four-college cooperation and increasing of class size. He noted 



2189 



2L90 



COMMITTEE 



Ph.D. Degree 
Requirements 



Ph.D. Degree 
in Animal 
Science 



Course 
Actions 



School of 

Business 

Administration 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the surveillance being exercised over course offerings and pointed 

out the pruning of the catalogue courses that is constantly going 

on. 

The committee discussed the Graduate School program and 

it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve changes in the requirement for 
the Ph.D. degree included in the list en- 
titled Attachment C which is attached to 
these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes. 

After a discussion of the graduate program in Agriculture 

the committee 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
a Ph.D. degree program in Animal Science 
as described in Attachment D and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

After a discussion of undergraduate courses, the 

committee 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Trustees that they 

approve new undergraduate courses, change 
in course numbers, transfer of course, 
change names of departments and deletion 
of courses from the curricula as listed 
in Attachment E to the minutes and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

After a discussion of organizational problems of the Uni- 
versity, the committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the organization of the School of Busi- 
ness Administration as described in 
Attachment F to these minutes and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

After a discussion of the Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture, the committee 



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COMMITTEE 



2191 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

establishment of a two-year practical course 
in Food Distribution in the Stockb ridge 
School of Agriculture and that the faculty 
of the College of Agriculture be charged 
with the responsibility of developing an 
appropriate curriculum so that students may 
be admitted to the program beginning in 
September 1959. 

The committee adjourned at 12:30 p.m. to the Student 

Union where they dined with the Deans and Directors. 



Food 

Distribution 

Course 




Secretary 






2L92 


UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 


1 


COMMITTEE 










1 
I 



Attachment C 



1 



CHANCES XN PH.D. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



A. The following changes in the requirements for the Ph.D. degree 
{page 10 of the 1959-61 Graduate School Catalog): 

1. Unchanged. 

2. The successful completion of graduate courses in the major 
field and in a minor field or fields related to, but not 
part of the major field. The Guidance Committee will de- 
termine the number of graduate credits which the student 
must earn in the major and minor field provided that at 
least 15 credits must be earned in the minor field. 

3. Unchanged. 

4. Unchanged. 

5. Unchanged. 

6. Satisfying the residence requirement. Three years beyond 
the bachelor's degree are required. The equivalent of at 
least one academic year of full-time graduate work must be 
spent at the University of Massachusetts. No credit is 
valid after nine years. 

7. Unchanged. 

5. Courses "Open to Graduate Students Only:" 

As credit toward the Master of Education degree only, 
the following Summer Institute courses for high school 
teachers of Biology (these will be supported by a grant 
which the University has received from the National Science 
Foundation for the summer of 1959): 

1) B iology S. I. 110 , E COLOGY . - A basic course in ecological 
principles with ecosystem approach. 

Two lectures and two laboratory or field periods per week. 

Credit, 2. 
D. P. Snyder and 



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- 2 - 

Biology S. I. 112, APV/NCSS IN PHYSIOLOGY ATP GENETICS. - 
Two lectures "and one diacussion-dembnstration period per week. 

Credit, 3. 
P, A, Swenson, A. C, Gentile, J. L. Roberts, and H. Rauch. 

Biology S.I. 113, CLASS IFI CATION OF P LANTS . - 
One U-hour period per week. Credit, 1, 

E. L. Davis, 

Biology S.I. 123 , CLASS IFICATION OF INVERTEBRATES. 
One" li-hbur period per week, ~ - Credit, 1, 

J. R. Traver. 

2) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Chemical Engineerin g 222, ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER II. - This course 
is designed for those graduate students who wish to continue the 
study of heat transfer beyond that presently offered in M,E, 221, 
The work load is evenly divided between theory and design. Sub- 
jects covered include natural and forced convection, heating and 
cooling both inside and outside of tubes, condensing vapors, 
boiling liquids and fluidized systems. 
Prerequisite, Kechanical Engineering 82 or 221 or Chemical 
Engineering 198, Cteedit, 3 

Mr. Cashin 

3) EDUCATION 

Education 110, EVALUATION IN ELBIENTARY SCHOOLS.- Standardized and 
teacher made tests, rating scales, report cards, growth charts, 
readiness ne BC ures, and diagnosis of educational deficiency in 
elementary pupils, (To be taken instead of Education 15>3 by 
those training for elementary teaching. ) Credit, 2-3« 

The Staff. 

Education 120, CONSTRUCTION OF AUDIO-VISUAL AIDS.- Designed to 
help teachers and audio-visual specialists to prepare audio- 
visual materials for use in an educational program. Students 
will prepare slides, graphics, recordings, still pictures, 
motion pictures. Credit, 2-3, 

Prerequisite, Education 166, Mr, Wyman. 

Education 12 1, TEACHING 1?ITH TELEVISION AND RADIO.- To provide 
the classroom teacher and school administrator with an under- 
standing of radio and television so that they can participate 
in the preparation, utilization, and evaluation of educational 
programs. 

Prerequisite, Education 166 or equivalent, and consent of 
instructor. Credit, 2-3. 

Mr, Wyman. 

Education 130, ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE. - Methods and materials 
of instruction. Credit, 2-3. 

The Staff. 

Education 131, ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES. - Recent findings 
in research in terms of their implications for the elementary 
school social studies program. Credit, 2-3. 

Mr. Rogers. 



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- 3 - 

E vocation 216, SEMIN AR IN EDUCATION. -Group study of current problems 
in curriculum, instruction, and administration, involving inten- 
sive study and research in specific phases. Credit, 2-3. 

The Staff. 

Education 231, CONTEM PORARY PR OBLEMS IH EDUCATION. -An intensive examin- 
ation of several fundamental issues f aciug our public education, 
Prerequisite, Certification for Teaching Credit, 2-3. 

Mr. Eddy and Mr. Zeitlin. 

Education 283, THE CO MPREHENSIVE HIGH SCHOOL.- A critical study of the 
historical development, objectives, course offerings, and crucial 
issues confronting the all-purpose high school, grades 10-12. 
Prerequisite, Cert if i cation for Teaching., Credit, 2-3. 

(In effect, Education 283 will replace Education 183 Mr. Anthony 
which has been dropped. ) 

k) ENGLISH 

English 200, SPECIAL PROBLEMS, - For students wishing to do special 
work not covered by courses listed in the curriculum. Permission 
must be secured from the Head of the Department and the instructor 
under whom the study will be done* The latter will supervise and 
evaluate the work. Credit, 2-6. 

The Staff. 

5) GEOLOGY 

Geology 235, APPALACHIAN GEOLOGY .- Geologic history and regional 
tectonics of New England and other Appalachian areas, with emphasis 
on controversial problems. Extensive reading required and student 
discussion expected* Credit, 2, 

Two hours. Hr. UcGill. 

6) HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics 121, DEVELOPMENTS IN NUTRIT IO N EDUCATION. - Interpretation 
of changing and new concepts and of technical material? place of 
nutrition in schools and public health programs. 

Prerequisites, Home Economics 52 or 3 credits in physiological sciences. 
Three class hours. Credit, 3« 

Mrs. Cook and Miss Mitchell. 

Home Econom ic s 130, HOIiE IIAKAGEtnSNT FOR TODAY'S FAMILIES. - Emphasis on 
management principles involved in family economics, work simplifica- 
tion, and decision making in the home. For teachers, extension 
workers, and others who work in an advisery capacity with families. 
Prerequisites, B.S. degree in Home Economics, Home Economics 175 and 
177, or equivalent, and professional experience. Credit, 2-3. 

Miss Merriam and Miss Strattner 
(with Home Management Specialists and 
Research Staff in Family Finance). 



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7) POULTRY SCIENCE 

Poultry Science 135, ADVANCED POULTRY HUSBANDRY.- A critical 
review of research in any one of these fields: (a) genetics 
and physiology, (b) nutrition, (c) marketing, or (d) incubation 
and brooding. Three written reports and a comprehensive final 
examination are required. Designed for teachers of vocational 
agriculture. 

Prerequisites are standard undergraduate courses in 
Poultry Husbandry, Credit, 3. 

The Staff, 

8) SOCIOLOGY 

Sociolo gy 112^ SOCIAL CHANGE,- Analysis of change as a process, 
especially the factors making for acceptance or rejection of 
innovations. Planned and unplanned consequences of social 
movement, technological invention and culture contact. 
Prerequisites, Sociology 72 and permission of instructor. 

Credit, 3. 

Mr. King. 

Sociology 115, THE SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION ,- The relations of 
religious ideology and ecclesiastical organization to the total 
social institutional system, Special attention to the religions 
of larger civilizations, especially Islam, Buddhism, Medieval 
Christianity, Gentile Paganism, Protestantism, and Judaism, 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Credit, 3» 

Mr. Manfredi. 

Sociology 117, JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. - Theories of causation and 

treatment of delinquency. 

Prerequisites, Sociolegy 78 and permission of instructor. 

Credit, 3« 
Mr, Yablonsky. 

Socio logy 118, INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY .-A study of the role, status, 
and function of the worker in the industrial community; the im- 
pact of technological change on the community] analysis of 
selected occupational functions, Credit, 3» 

Prerequisites, Sociology 68. or. Economics 79 and Mr, Korson, 
permission of instructor. 

Sociology 220, SOCIOLOGY OF SMALL GROUPS .- Survey of sociological 
theory and research of small groups,, Dynamics of leadership 
patterns, role theories, organization-discrganization theories, 
decision making, interaction procsss and sociometric structuring. 
The relevance of small group theory and research to concepts of 
the inclusive social system, 
Three class hours. 

Prerequisites, Sociology 82 or equivalent, and per- Credit, 3, 
mission of instructor, Mr. Yablonsky, 



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-$- 



rm Sociology 2&, SOCIAL STRA TIFICATION,- A consideration of the 

i major European and American theorists" and their contribution 

" in this area* Research techniques in the analysis of social 

class and social mobility are examined* 
Three class hours. 

Prerequisites, Sociology 15? or equivalent, and pifcraiasion 
of instructor. Credit, 3* 

Jfr. Levine, 

Sociology 262, DEMOGRAPHY.- An analysis of the demographic tran- 
sition from peasant-agriculturalism to urban-industrialism. 
Emphasis is given to the consequences of this transition for 
patterns of settlement and for fertility, mortality, and migration. 
Special studies are made of the demographic characteristics of 
non-industrialized nations as factors in their potential develop- 
ment* Three class hours* 

Prerequisites, Sociology l6l cr equivalent and Credit, 3* 
permission of instructor, Mr* Wilkinson, 

9) ANTHROPOLOGY 

Anthropology 136, INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY. - A orosiMWltural con- 
sideration of the relationship between the individual and his 
society with attention to theories, methods and empirical find- 
ings as reported in anthropological literature. 
Prerequisites, Anthropology 163, 166, and permission of instructor, 
I Credit, 3. 

i§ Mr, Swartz, 

Anthropology 137, THEORY IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY. - Theoretical 
problems which have had a lasting place in anthropological 
thought; social structure, cultural dynamics and stability, 
and the transmission of culture as discussed by leading writers. 
Prerequisites, Anthropology 163, 16U, and permission of instructor* 

Credit, 3. 
Mr* Swartz* 

10) CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 233, SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.- One to 
three topics of current interest will be discussed in detail. 
Recent development of theoretical and/or synthetic importance 
to organic chemistry will be covered, A maximum of six credits 
may be taken. Three class hours. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 181 or permission of instructors. 

Credit, 3-6. 
The Staff. 



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■ 



. 



'• 



- 



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Attachment D 



-11- 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

D. J, Hankinson, major adviser 

COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 
(For either major or minor credit) 



200. Special Problems. - A specific problem in some aspect of 
animal science. 

Credit, 3-6 
The Staff 



205. Ruminant Nutrition. - An advanced course in ruminant diges- 
tion and metabolism. Special topics will be selected and 
(Note: course discussed in the light of recent and current research, 
write-up 



changed ) 



! 



211. 

(Note: course 
write-up 
changed ) 



215. 

(Note: new 
course to be 
considered by 
Graduate 
Council ) 



Prerequisites, Animal Science 151 and Chemistry 179, or 
equivalent. 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Elliot, Mr. Archibald and 
Mr, Fenner 

Advanced Animal Genetics. Modern research in animal breeding with 
emphasis on the statistical approach. This includes the devel- 
opment of selection indexes for various farm mammals , sire in- 
dexes, and breeding plans based on systems of mating and selection. 

Prerequisites, Animal Science 166 and Agricultural Eco- 
nomics 177 and 180, or equivalent. 

Credit 3 
Mr, Gaunt 

Mammalian Reproduction, - An advanced course emphasizing the 
comparative approach to problems of reproductive anatomy and 
endocrinology. Lectures, laboratory and seminar reports deal 
with theoretical and practical considerations of current research 
findings in laboratory and domestic animals, and in primates. 



Prerequisites, Zoology 172 and 187, 



Credit, 3 

Mr. Greenstein 



\ 



216. Fertility and Fecundity. - The role of heredity, nutrition, 
pathology and environment in the determination of fertil- 
ity and fecundity in mammalian forms. Current research 
directed toward control of reproductive function through 
experimental means is emphasized. 

Prerequisites, Animal Science 166 and Zoology 187, or 
Animal Science 215, 

Credit, 3 
io*. Black 



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-12- 



226. The Histology of Domestic Animals. - A functional study of the 
tissues and organs of domestic animals with special emphasis 
on those features which have particular economic or physio- 
logical significance in the fields of livestock production, 
meats, nutrition, milk secretion and animal breeding. 



Prerequisites, Zoology 150, and Veterinary Science 175 or 

equivalent. 

Credit, 3 

Mr. Greenstein 



229, 230. Seminar, - Reports on current literature. 



Credit, 1 each 
semester (Max. 
credit, U 

The Staff 



300. Thesis, Master's Degree 
400. Thesis, Ph.D. Degree 



Credit, 5-10 
Credit, 30 



I 



COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS FOR WHICH MAJOR CREDIT MAY BE GIVEN 



Agricultural Economics 177, Elementary Experimental Statistics, 



Agricultural Economics 180, Advanced Statistical Method, 



Agronomy 264., Experimental Methods in Agronomy, 



Bacteriology 185, Immunology, 



Bacteriology 202, Advanced Bacterial Physiology, 



Bacteriology 205. Advanced Immunology, 



Chemistry 185. Radiochemistry, 



Credit, 3 
Mr. Russell 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Russell 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Yegian 

Credit, 3 
Miss Garvey 

Credit, 3-5 

Mr, Mandel 

Credit, 3-6 
Miss Garvey 

Credit, 3 
.-", Richason 



I 



Chemistry 234-. Advanced Biocherical Lectures, 



Chemistry 235. Advanced Biochemical Methods, 



Chemistry 236. Advanced Biochemical Analysis. 



Credit, 3 
Mr 3 Little 

Credit, 3-5 
Mr , Little 

Credit, 3-5 
Mr . Little 



> 



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-13- 



1 



Chemistry 237, Biocolloids. 

Chemistry 239. Chemistry of Natural Products, 



Credit, 3 
Mr , Bennett 

Credit , 2 
Mr, Little and Mr, McVJhorter 



Home Economics 203. Advanced Nutrition-Metabolism of the 

Major Foodstuffs, 



Credit, 3 
Miss Mitchell 



Home Economics 204. Advanced Nutrition-Vitamins and Minerals Credit, 3 

Miss Mitchell 



Home Economis 205. Laboratory Methods and Techniques in 

Nutrition. 

Poultry Science 205. Avian Genetics. 

Poultry Science 206, Advanced Poultry Genetics. 

Poultry Science 207, Advanced Poultry Nutrition, 

Poultry Science 208. Advanced Poultry Physiology. 

Zoology 150. Histology of Vertebrates. 

Zoology 172, Vertebrate Embryology, 

Zoology 178, Genetics of Animal Populations, 

Zoology 183, General and Cellular Physiology, 

Zoology I84. Comparative Physiology. 

Zoology 187. Endocrinology, 

Zoology 220. Experimental Embryology, 

Zoology 245. Advanced Vertebrate Physiology,, 

Zoology 24.8. Physiological Genetics, 



Credit, 3 
Mrs. Uertz 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Smyth 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Fox 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Anderson 

Credit, 3 
Mr, iiellen 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Rollason 



Credit, 4 
Mr, Woodwise, Mr. Rauch and Mr. Bartlett 



Credit, 2 
Mr, Rauch 

Credit, 4 
Mr, Svanson 

Credit, 4 
Mr, Roberts 

Credit, 3 
Mr Snedecor 

Credit, 3 

i-t: , ' T oodside 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Snedecor 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Rauch 



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-H- 



COURSES OPEN TO BOTH GRADUATE AMD UNDERGRA DU ATE STUDENTS 
(For either major or minor credit) 

165. Reproduction in Farm Animals. - Comparative aspects of anatomy, 
embryology, endocrinology and physiology of the reproductive 
systems of farm mammals, concepts of fertility and sterility, 
and practice in semen collection, artificial insemination and 
pregnancy diagnosis. 

Credit,, 3 
Mr, Black 

166. Applied Animal Genetics, - The workings of heredity and variation in 
farm maximal s, and the role of selection procedures and breeding 
systems in genetic improvement of livestock. 

Prerequisite, Zoology 153, Credit, 3 

Mr. Gaunt 

175. Milk Secretion. - The physiology of milk secretion in relation to 

the endocrine glands v/hich control it and to more practical aspects 
of dairy production „ The development of the mammary gland from 
birth through parturition and lactation is studied grossly and 
microscopically., 

Credit, 2 
Mr. Foley 

* New course to be proposed to Course of Study Committees, 

COUPSES FOR MINOR CREDIT ONLY 
(No graduate credit for students majoring in Animal Science) 

151. Fundamentals of Animal Nutrition. Credit, 3 

Mr. Elliot 

152. Feeds and Feeding, Credit, 2 

Mr. Elliot 

154. Meat Processing, Credit, 3 

Mr a Lj~k 

* 156. Beef, Sheep and Swine Production, Credit, L, 

wr j Baker 

* 178. Dairy Cattle Production, Cre-it, 4 

Mr, 7j'uy 

* Change in course content end/or credit to be proposed to Course of 
Study Committees. 



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-15- 
OTHER CATALOGUE CHANGES 



Add: Animal Science to the courses available as roajor subjects for the 
degree Doctor of Philosophy in the section bitlec 1 'OerfcrrC. In- 
formatior.'' and found on page 12 of the 1957-59 'iraduatu School 

catalogue, 



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Attachment B 

New Undergraduate Courses, Change In Course Numbers, 
Transfer Of Course, Change Names Of Departments And 
Deletion Of Courses From The Curricula 

Proposed New Undergraduate Courses 

Art 42 - Oil Painting: A continuation of Art 41. The revised description 

of 41 and 42 reads: An introduction to easel painting in oil and related 
media, based on an elementary understanding of the physical properties of 

the medium and encouraging individual direction within the limitations of 
sound pictorial composition. 

6 studio hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Art 41 

Art 44 - Water Color: A continuation of Art 43. The revised description 
of the two courses reads: A basic approach to water color painting on 
paper, with initial concentration on transparent water color, emphasizing 
control of techniques and mastery of color relationships. Further ex- 
perience with opaque watercolor, such as gouache and casein, is encouraged. 
6 studio hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Art 43 

Business Law 73 : This course will cover Partnerships, Corporations, the 
law of credit and credit instruments. It will also include the fields of 
Real Property and Mortgages. 

Prerequisite: Business Law 71 3 credits 

(Formerly 70) 

Economics 82 - Economic Development: Economic problems of underdeveloped 

countries and the policies necessary to induce growth. Individual projects 
will be required. 
Prerequisite: Economics 25 3 credits 

Food Management 81 (I) Hotel Practice - Elements of Hotel Management. 
Food Management 81 will be offered in place of Food Management 67 (Food 
Preparation and Service, Quantity Foods). Food Management majors will 
obtain quantity food training by taking Home Economics 92, Quantity Food 
Preparation. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory 3 credits 

Food Management 82 (II) Laws of Innkeeping (Institution Law). Law as applied 
to hotels and food service establishments; includes a consideration of bail- 
ments, torts, regulations, insurance, and sanitation. 
Prerequisite: Business Law 70 3 credits 

3 class hours 

Mechanical Engineering 89 - Instrumentation. The study of mechanical in- 
strumentation with particular emphasis on mechanical-electrical transducers. 
A few pertinent heat power experiments will be included. For E. E. majors 
only or permission of instructor. 

1 class hour; 1 3-hour laboratory 2 credits 

Prerequisite: M. E. 66 



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2. 



Psychology 87 - Industrial Psychology II. The application of human factors 
data to the analysis, evaluation, design and use of man-machine systems and 
equipment. Emphasis is on analysis of human abilities and limitations of 
speed, accuracy, perception and decision processes. 

3 class hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Psychology 26 

Psychology 89 - Psychology of Occupations. A developmental study of in- 
dividual interests, attitudes and abilities as related to occupational se- 
lection and proficiency. Included will be consideration of the psychometric 
and psychological survay techniques fundamental to occupational research. 
3 class hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Psychology 26 and 81 

University Studies : Honors 51 - Junior Honors Symposium. The presentation 

and discussion of topics emphasizing inter-relationships of the various 

disciplines and selected topics in specialized subject matter?. 

Meets once a month No accdemic credit 

For Junior Honors Students 

Instructors: Visiting lecturers 

(To be offered Fall, 1960) 

Change in Number and Transfer of Course to Another College 

From Zoology 85, Anthropods Other Than Insects to: J.lntomology 83, 
Anthropods Other Than Insects, and transfer this course from the Depart- 
ment of Zoology, College of Arts and Sciences, to the Department of 
Entomology and Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture. 

Change in Name of Department 

From Department of Sociology to Department of Sociology and Anthropology. 
From Department of Geology and Mineralogy to Department of Geology. 

Deletion of Courses from University Curricula 

Food Management 67. Food Preparation and Service, Quantity Foods. 

Physical Education 63 & 64 - Teaching Sports for Secondary Schools 

Physical Education 65 - Play Activities and Games for Elementary Schools 

Physical Education 66 - Rhythms and Dancing for the Elementary School 

Physical Education 68 - Water Safety Instructor Course 

(The above courses in Physical Education (for women) have 
been replaced by other courses in the new curriculum in 
Physical Education for women previously approved by the 
Board of Trustees.) 

Animal Husbandry 74. Advanced Meats 

Forestry 62. The Management of Small Woodlands 

Food Technology 85. Marine Products Technology 

Food Technology 86. Marine Products Technology 

Food Technology 96. Introductory Research Methods 

Fisheries Technology - option listed under Food Technology 



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Attachment F 



Proposal for Departmentalization 
School of Business Administration 



1. De partments ; 



ACCOUNTING „«.*««, 

GENERAL BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

MANAGEMENT 

MARKETING 



-1,-1 1 h* deaianated a Chairman (the term 
For each Department ther e ^all b e desi gnacec t shall n0t 

"Head of Department- shall not be used) . The pp ^ rank 

2 ^ S^of thf ^VT^* t Ue Provost and the 
President. 

» #.««* «f five years, with reappoint- 
Each Chairman shall ^ *°. *^ f a committee and the Dean, 
ment possible, upon recommendation or a coim» 

« shaU be understood that no < fcairaan ah all attain tenura status 
as a Chaitman but only as a Mtibar of tha faculty. 

- f 5 . upon official approval 'l^^JlXTX* Sereaf cer" 

1 SEE susU b C a S££J S *. SS of f iv/yeats under conations 

indicated in #3. 

». is tha second yea, that « h. ~ ^ «»^ ,, £SJS^c2EE , 
substantially like the ones ne»«oned in *^ "^ iM officially 

S.-.-Sr Su. 1 -^ S£tT- - — «— cf 

Departments and the appointment of Chairmen. 



1 



3. 
4. 
5. 



H. B. Kirshen, Dean 

School of Business Administration 



I 



F 



f 



COMMITTEE 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE 
ON AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 

April 9, 1959, 10:00 a.m., Stockbridge Hall, Univ. of Mass., Amherst 

Chairman Brown presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Brown, Crowley, McNamara, 

President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Gillespie, and by invitation 
of the Committee: Messrs. Sieling, 
Jeffrey, Davis and Allan of the 
College of Agriculture 

Dean Sieling and Mr. Allan discussed the Cooperative Ex- 
tension Appointments and Membership in the U. S. Civil Service Re- 
tirement System as it pertains to persons within the Extension 
Service - both State and County. Due to changes in Federal regula- 
tions as described in Attachment A, it was requested that a new 
policy statement be adopted. Upon motion duly made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
adopt the following policy: 

a. To continue to recommend to the Federal Ex- 
tension Administrator approval of personnel 
actions affecting members of the present 
state and county Extension staffs who are 
now holding appointments as Agent Without 
Compensation in the United States Department 
of Agriculture unless such staff members re- 
quest in writing to the Director of Exten- 
sion that their appointments be terminated. 

b. That in all other instances affecting present 
and future state and county Extension workers 
there be no recommendations made by the State 
Extension Director to the Federal Extension 
Administrator for appointment as Agent With- 
out Compensation in the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture until such time as 
acceptance of Federal personnel benefits 

are no longer conditions of eligibility for 
such appointment. 



2193 



Cooperat ive 

Policy - 

State and County 

Extension 

Workers 



2194 



COMMITTEE 



Land for 
College of 
Agriculture 



Applet on 
Farm 



County 
Extension 
Services - 
personnel 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There is available $150,000 for the purchase of land to 
be used in connection with the College of Agriculture. The Land 
Committee of the College of Agriculture generally agrees that farm 
operations on the main campus are not feasible in the light of 
University development. Land adjacent to the campus which was 
originally considered satisfactory for farm use has been impaired 
by the construction of a limited access highway which now makes the 
property difficult to reach. Thus, the Committee is looking away 
from the campus for an area in which the entire operation may be 
located. There are many advantages in taking the farm operation 
completely off the campus. There will be economy in building con- 
struction if the farm buildings do not have to blend with the 
present type of construction now on the campus. Economies can be 
realized through inexpensive methods of handling supplies and equip- 
ment. Department Heads in the College of Agriculture are enthusi- 
astic about this proposal. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the College of Agriculture continue 

to seek feasible off-campus areas to which 
the farm operation might move. 

Chairman Brown inquired about the status of the Appleton 
Farm. President Mather stated that information pertaining to the 
Appleton Farm which appeared in the newspapers very recently was not 
obtained from University personnel. He thought it was unfortunate 
that the story broke at this time. Negotiations with Colonel 
Appleton are still in progress and are progressing satisfactorily. 

Dean Sieling discussed the administration and organization 
relationship between the University and County Extension Services. 
The legal separation of the Counties from the University creates 
numerous problems concerning the management of the program. One 



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COMMITTEE 



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2195 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

difficulty results from the separate County personnel system which 
allows practically no flexibility in the employment of professional 
personnel. It was suggested that the entire program could be made 
more effective by changes in the law which would make the County 
Extension Services an integral part of the University --a true ex- 
tension of the University into the counties. Efforts to accomplish 
this change are being initiated within the various counties. 

Dean Sieling discussed a recent discovery by three Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts professors who found a way to produce 
vaccine in a very short time, as described in Attachment B. The 
financial rewards as well as the contribution to scientific 
knowledge could be substantial. The professors involved are seek- 
ing a patent on the process which brings up the whole problem of 
what is the University's position relating to patents which are de- 
veloped by University personnel. At the present time the Univer- 
sity has no policy on this matter and employees are not bound to 
give the University any rewards which accrue through their research 
and discoveries. In the present case, the professors desired that 
the University share in potential benefits and thus an agreement 
between them and Dean Sieling was drawn up by which the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural Experiment Station shall receive 55% of all net 
royalties arising from the proposed patent and the remaining shares 
of 45% shall be divided equally among the inventors. The Dean does 
not know whether such an agreement will be binding upon the pro- 
fessors nor whether the percentage division of potential reward is 
equitable. What the situation does point out very clearly is that 
the University needs a policy covering patents and discoveries by 
University personnel. 



Policy State- 
ment Covering 
Patents & 
Discoveries 



2L96 



COMMITTEE 



College of 
Agriculture 
Professional 
Personnel 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather pointed out that the administration is 
working on the total problem concerning not only patents and 
discoveries but also the problem of outside employment for Uni- 
versity personnel. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the administration continue 
its study of the problem of outside employment, 
and patents and inventions by University 
personnel with the idea of preparing a policy 
statement for consideration by the Board of 
Trustees. 

Dean Sieling discussed the problem of properly recording 
costs in the College of Agriculture. Under the present system the 
, working time of professional personnel is not properly allocated to 
the various accounts. For example, salaries for Department Heads 
are now charged to Instruction, whereas in many cases these persons 
are partially engaged in research or other activities. The college 
administration has proposed an integrated College of Agriculture 
payroll so that each service area will reflect proper direct costs. 
Such information is imperative so that the College of Agriculture 
will have no difficulty when the United States General Accounting 
Office audits the Federal expenditures of the College of Agriculture 
The committee of the Trustees recognized the problem and urged that 
the University administration devise an acceptable method of cost 
accounting to accurately reflect expenditures in various programs. 

The title "College of Agriculture" according to President 
Mather does not adequately describe the type of work, the programs 
nor the organizational relationship of the College of Agriculture 
to the University. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The University is now organized into divisions, schools 
and colleges. The College of Arts and Sciences (described in some 
universities as the general college) offers courses which undergird 
the programs of all our curricula. "Schools" are units devoted to 
areas of specialized study such as Engineering, Education, Home 
Economics, Nursing; "Divisions" are less precise areas of concentra- 
tion such as Physical Education. The College of Agriculture because 
of its diversity of activity is properly identified by neither the 
term "college", nor "school" nor "division". Because of its unique 
relationship with the Federal Government through the State Experi- 
ment Station Division and the Federal Extension Service and because 
of its variety of activities of college instruction research activi- 
ties in the Experiment Station, the Control Service and the sponsored 
research and because of its activities in the Division of Extension 
with food and agriculture, Home Economics and 4-H Club work, a more 
adequate and descriptive title should be used. Many other land-grant 
colleges have changed the name of their College of Agriculture to a 
similar title as suggested here. The term "Institute" more nearly 
describes the complexity of operation now being performed by this 
unit of the University. Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they change the name of the College of 
Agriculture to the Institute of Food and 
Agricultural Sciences. 

The meeting adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 



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yjUb^, 



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Secretary 



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Institute of 
Food & Agri- 
cultural Sciences 



2198 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



ATTACHMENT A 

Policy Determination on Question of Requesting Cooperative 
Extension Appointments for County and University Extension 
Staff as Agents Without Compensation of the United States 
Department of Agriculture 

On May 16, 1955, the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts voted unanimously 
to adopt the following resolution. 

"Resolved that the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
is opposed at present to the ruling compelling all Cooperative Extension 
workers in Massachusetts to he members of the Federal Retirement System 
as a specific requirement for cooperative Federal appointments. The 
Board requests that the Administration of the University of Massachusetts 
investigate all possibilities for resolving the problems connected with 
the conflict between Federal and State Retirement Systems." 

The results of our investigations and the recommendations resulting therefrom 
follow: 

History : 

Cooperative Extension appointments as Agents Without Compensation of the United 
States Department of Agriculture have been issued to County Extension workers 
since 1920. State Extension workers have been issued such appointments since 
July 1, 1929. 

The purposes of these cooperative appointments were -- (1) to make the benefits of 
the penalty mail privilege available to the Extension program; and (2) to recognize 
the cooperative nature of Extension work. 

Cooperative Extension workers holding such appointments were excluded from member- 
ship in the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System from 1920 to 1945 because the 
appointment as Agent Without Compensation was not intended for such purpose and, 
also, the U. S. Civil Service Retirement Act of August 1, 1920 limited membership 
to regular Federal Civil Service employees. 

Since there was no intent to extend coverage to employees of a level of government 
other than Federal, cooperative Extension workers as employees of individual states 
and counties, obviously, were excluded. 

On January 24, 1942 the U. S. Civil Service Retirement Act was amended and extended 
to cover all officers and employees in or under the executive, judicial, and legis- 
lative branches of the government. The responsibility for definition of 
eligibility for membership was placed in the hands of the executive branch, and by 
Executive Order on May 1, 1942 President Roosevelt excluded from participation in 
the system 'cooperative employees not wholly under the control of the federal 
government and not otherwise subject to the U. S. Civil Service Retirement Act." 

During the period 1920 to 1945 attempts were made by cooperative Extension workers 
and their associations to obtain a ruling or legislation which would qualify them 
for membership in the Federal Retirement System. All such attempts met with fail- 
ure until the Fall of 1945 when, in a meeting between representatives of various 
agencies of the United States Department of Agriculture and the members of the Civil 
Service Commission, it was disclosed that the Commission had established a defini- 
tion of what constituted service "in or under the federal government" by a minute 
of July 29, 1944. That definition is as follows: 



t 



f 



f 



2. 

'The words 'in or under the executive, judicial, and legislative branches 
of the United States Government 1 appearing in section 3 (a) of the Retire- 
ment Act shall be construed to include only persons who 

(a) are engaged in the performance of Federal functions under 
authority of an Act of Congress or an Executive Order and 

(b) are appointed or employed by a Federal officer, and 

(c) are under the supervision and direction of a Federal Officer 
and for these reasons are officers or employees of the United 
States Government." 

The Extension Service put forward the argument that employees of the Cooperative 
Extension Service, serving under appointment with the Department, met the three 
requirements, because they were 

(a) operating under the Smith-Lever and subsequent Federal Acts; 

(b) were appointed as agents of the Department of Agriculture; and 

(c) were supervised and directed by the State director of extension, 
who was appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture. 

After numerous conferences between representatives of the Federal Extension Service 
and the Civil Service Commission regarding the eligibility of Cooperative Extension 
employees to become members of the Federal Retirement System, it was determined 
that Cooperative Extension employees came within the definition of what constituted 
'employment" subject to the act. 

The State Extension Directors were advised of this determination in September of 
1945 with an apparent understanding that membership in the Federal Civil Service 
Retirement System by Cooperative Extension workers holding federal appointments 
was optional and not mandatory. The result of this ruling in Massachusetts was 
that several members of the State and County Extension staffs joined the Federal 
Retirement System, and the first cases submitted to the Civil Service Commission 
with application for retirement benefits were approved. 

This situation continued until 1953 when it became apparent that membership in the 
Federal Civil Service Retirement System when eligible was not optional but 
mandatory. Conferences were held on the problems involved with the result that the 
following statement was issued by the Extension Committee on Organization and 
Policy (ECOP) and issued by the office of the Federal Extension Administrator as 
policy in July of 1953. 

CIVIL SERVICE RETIREMENT AS I T APPLIES TO COOPERA TIVE EX TENSION EMPLOYEES 
UNDER APPOINTMENT WITH THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

This committee believes the decision of the Civil Service Commission in 1946 that 
Extension workers under cooperative appointment with the United States Department 
of Agriculture were covered by the provisions of the Civil Service Retirement Act 
was proper and in accordance with the way the Cooperative Extension Service func- 
tions. This committee recognizes that there are certain problems inherent in the 
administration of the Retirement Act because of the cooperative arrangement between 
the Department of Agriculture and the Land-Grant institutions, and the Federal and 
State laws governing the operations of the services. These administrative problems 






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3. 

are not insurmountable and it is believed that they can and should be handled in 
such a way as to fully comply with the provisions of the Federal Retirement Act. 
To accomplish this, the following recommendations are made: 

1. That all States and Territories adopt a requirement that no later than 
January 1, 1956, new cooperative extension employees (i.e., those holding Federal 
appointments) participate in the Federal retirement plan. If such requirement is 
not made effective the State should not request a cooperative appointment for those 
individuals who do not agree to participate in the Federal plan. 

2. Each State or Territory not now doing so arrange by January 1, 1956, to 
handle the monthly (Federal) retirement contributions by means of a payroll with- 
holding plan in so far as practicable to do so. 

3. Extension employees currently eligible for participation but not contrib- 
uting to the retirement fund be encouraged to participate by January 1, 1956, or 
as soon thereafter as possible. Until such time as all extension workers holding 
cooperative appointments with the United States Department of Agriculture as agents 
without compensation are making contributions to the Federal Retirement Act the 
State and Federal (Extension) Offices are in violation of retirement regulations. 
It is necessary that with minimum delay all extension workers holding appointment 
as agents contribute to the Federal Retirement fund. 

During 1950 and 1951 the Massachusetts Tax Payers Association became interested in 
the fact that a Cooperative Extension worker could enjoy the benefits of membership 
in two publicly supported retirement systems simultaneously while on a single job. 

At the same time the Massachusetts County Treasurers Association determined that 
county retirement credit and payments should apply only to the portion of the salary 
of a county employee actually paid from county funds. 

The result of the interest of these two groups in the retirement situation was the 
attached copy of Chapter 515 of the Acts and Resolves of 1952. Following is a 
summary of its provisions. 

Any employee, any part of whose salary, wages or other compensation is 
derived from federal grants and who, as a result thereof, is eligible 
for membership in the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System or who 
otherwise is eligible for such membership and who also is eligible for 
membership in any retirement system established under this Act, may 
have such portion of his salary, wages, or other compensation as is 
derived from federal grants included in his regular compensation as de- 
fined by Section 1. But as a condition precedent to membership he shall 
file an affidavit with the retirement board certifying that he is not a 
member of the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System. If the employee 
certifies that he is a member of the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System, 
he thereby waives all rights to membership in any retirement system estab- 
lished under this chapter. 

Any employee, who on January 1, 1952, was a member of both systems may continue his 
membership in both, providing the sum of his annuities on retirement does not exceed 
100% of his salary. Any excess beyond 100% will, in effect, reduce the state or 
county retirement annuity by an amount required to meet the 100% ceiling provision. 

The Massachusetts Extension Service had 28 employees who retained their dual mem- 
bership under the provisions of the above legislation. 



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4. 

At present we have 67 county employees and 24 state employees who are members of 
the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System. 

Following discussions with the membership of the various County Boards of Trustees 
and the University Board of Trustees and Administration and with the provisions of 
Massachusetts law in mind, it was determined that the policy regarding Extension 
workers, effective January 1, 1957, would be as follows: 

County Extension Workers ; 

1. The cooperative appointment of county Extension workers not contributing 
members of the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System would not be cancelled by the 
State Extension Director (these appointments were terminated by the Federal Exten- 
sion Service on or about February 15, 1957, retroactive to October 1, 1956). 

2. All new county Extension workers would be issued cooperative appointments 
and, therefore, would be members of the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System. 

3. The payroll deduction provision of the directive received from the Federal 
Extension Office dated November 16, 1956 would be carried out. 

State Extension Workers : 

1. The cooperative appointment of state Extension workers not contributing 
members of the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System would not be cancelled by the 
State Extension Director (these appointments were terminated by the Federal Exten- 
sion Service on or about February 15, 1957, retroactive to October 1, 1956). 

2. No new Extension workers employed by the University of Massachusetts would 
be issued cooperative appointments unless they came to their positions at the Uni- 
versity with a record of membership in the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System in 
the job held immediately prior to their appointments at the University and continued 
membership in the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System was a condition of accept- 
ing employment at the University. 

3. The payroll deduction provision of the directive received from the Federal 
Extension Office dated November 16, 1956 would be carried out. 

The condition described above has continued to the present time. 

Since the Federal Extension Administrator's directive of November 16, 1956 was re- 
ceived and put into effect, Massachusetts, along with several other states, has 
actively worked to separate eligibility to use the penalty mail privilege from a 
requirement of membership in the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System. The re- 
sults of this effort are contained in the following directive dated September 22, 
1958 received from the Federal Extension Administrator. 

"You will recall that at the Regional Directors Meetings this spring we 
discussed the decision made by the Department that the authority for ex- 
tension workers to use the penalty mailing privilege was based upon their 
official duties rather than their employment status with the Department. 

"In order to extend the penalty mailing privilege to extension workers 
not holding cooperative appointments (technically 'Agent Without Compensa- 
tion, 1 ) the following criteria is provided as a basis for authorizing the 
use of penalty mail in carrying on official U. S. Department of Agriculture 
business to such employees. 



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5. 

"1. That the employment status of such employee be such as 
to qualify for an appointment with the Department as 
'Agent Without Compensation' if such appointment were 
recommended. 

2. That he be responsible to the Director of Extension for 
program and performance. 

"3. That each extension worker authorized to use the penalty 
mail be notified officially of such authority with a copy 
provided to the Federal Extension Service, such notifica- 
tion to include name, title, official address of worker 
and name of approved project to which assigned. It is 
also necessary that when the authority to use penalty mail 
has been terminated the worker be notified in writing with 
a copy provided to the Federal Extension Service. 

"Extension workers not holding appointments as 'Agents Without Compensation' 
and not meeting the above criteria should not be authorized to use the pen- 
alty mailing privilege for any of the work they perform regardless of its 
nature . 

"The status of extension agents holding Department appointments as 'Agent 
Without Compensation' is not changed with respect to use of penalty mail." 

Since this directive effectively divorces eligibility to use the penalty mail 
privilege from membership in the U. S. Civil Service Retirement System, it is 
recommended that the policy of the University of Massachusetts be -- 

1. To continue to recommend to the Federal Extension Administrator approval 
of personnel actions affecting members of the present state and county Extension 
staffs who are now holding appointments as Agent Without Compensation in the United 
States Department of Agriculture unless such staff members request in writing to 
the Director of Extension that their appointments be terminated. 

2. That in all other instances affecting present and future state and county 
Extension workers there be no recommendations made by the State Extension Director 
to the Federal Extension Administrator for appointment as Agent Without Compensa- 
tion in the United States Department of Agriculture until such time as acceptance 
of Federal personnel benefits are no longer conditions of eligibility for such 
appointment. 



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TUP BOvSTON SUNDAY GLOBE— MARCH 1, J.I>5I» 



ATTACHMENT B 



UMass. Trio Speeds Vaccine Production 



1 



By IAN MENZIES 

Throe University of Massa 
etmsells professors have found 
a way to produce vaccine at 
n speed hitherto undreamed 
of. 

And the vaccine has been 
fhown very effective against 
the influenza virus. It is now 
being tested against other 
viruses. 

Instead of using: the present 
chemical process which rtiay 
take from three to five days 
ior a batch, the Amherst 
group can produce a quart 
In a little over a minute. 

Instead of using chemicals 
•to kill the virus so. that it can 
be used as - a vaccine, they are 
usihg a rapid heat exchanger, 
subjecting the virus to a rel- 
atively high temperature for 
times as little as 33-thou- 
Eandths of a second. 

The group includes Dr. War- 
ten, Litsky, Dr. Ralston B. 
Head, Jr., and Ray M. Dutcher, 
all members of the research 
staff at_ the University of Masj 
BacJiuTsefis Agr iSn|ure''Exper- 
{metit Slafion." ' 
atlRARdEli'fcehim misandml t 

If the method proves effec- 
tive in preparing vaccines to 
combat many viruses in hu- 
mans it means that, should 
an epidemic be in the offing, 
large population groups could 
be inoculated rapidly. 

It also, for the same reason, 
has potential as a germ war- 
fare defense weapon. 



1 



Brief Exposure 

The heat exchange method 
was hit on by the trio as the 
result of using this process in 
the pasteurization of milk. 

Heat, has been used before 
to "kill" viruses but because 
it was used in periods up to 
20 minutes or so, it killed the 
virus , so thoroughly that it 
was not effective as a protec- 
tive vaccine. 

Present research indicates, 
said Dr. Read, that by increas- 
ing temperatures and shorten- 
ing exposure time of the virus, 
there is a minimum amount, of 
destruction of the vital pro- 
teins which cause immuniza- 
tion lo disease. 



He explained that the hent- 
exchange process, by obviating 
chemicals, saves delay and 
expense. 

Tho method has been used 
to produce . successful vaccine 

against influenza and New- 
castle's disease in chickens. 
Laboratory experiments 
also have shown it effective 
against human Influenza 
virus, according to Dr. Read. 

"We are now experimenting 
with it against other human 
Virus diseases such as polio 
and measles." 

If effective for several hu- 
man viruses, this would be a 

much faster way of producing 
the so-called "dead" vaccine — 
not too potent. The other type 
of vaccine is the attenuated 
type — a safe, live vaccine. 
The polio vaccine now being 

used is a "dead" vaccine, 
though much work is also be- 
ing done on producing an at- 
tenuated variety — principally 
by Dr. Albert Sabin at 
Cincinnati. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON 
RECOGNIZED STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

April 24, 1959, 11:00 a.m., President's Office 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 
Chairman Crowley presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Brown, Crowley, Taber, Presi- 
dent Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Gillespie. At invitation by 
the committee: Provost McCune, Dean 
of Women Curtis, Dean of Men Hopkins, 
Director of the Student Union Scott, 
Director of Athletics McGuirk, Assistant 
Dean of Women Gonon, Assistant Dean of 
Men Burkhardt and members of the 
Athletic Council Allan, Cadigan and 
Alumni Director Leavitt were invited 
to join the meeting. 

Dean Curtis discussed the vital role that extra-curricu- 
lar activity plays in the academic life of the student. The aim 
of the student personnel offices is to allow as much freedom as 
possible to the students in order to develop their initiative and 
creative abilities. The dormitories on the campus of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts are social organizations and an informal 
classroom for learning. There will be ten women's dormitories next 
year. Approximately 150 women live in sorority houses. At the 
present time the sororities tend to be overcrowded not so much for 
sleeping facilities but many of the women students like to eat in 
the sororities and facilities are not adequate. The Women's 
Advisory Council has been a great help to the Dean of Women. 

Provost McCune explained how the various persons working 
in the field of student relations are coordinated. The University 
in the budget has been asking for a position, "Dean of Students", 
who would be the coordinator of all student personnel officers but 
until that is forthcoming the Provost has set up a SPAC Committee 



2199 



2200 



COMMITTEE 



Recognized 

Student 

Organizations 



Assistant 
Director of 
Student Union 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(Student Personnel Administrative Council) which meets once a 
week. Through this informal procedure activities affecting student 
life are coordinated. 

President Mather described the RSO (Recognized Student 
Organizations) administrative set-up on the campus. It corresponds 
in activities to the area of activity which is the concern of the 
Committee on Recognized Student Activities of the Board of Trustees, 
There are 163 student organizations on the campus that are 
recognized as operating with the approval of the administration. 
They are encompassed under the RSO which sets up (1) orderly 
financial procedure and (2) gives budgetary advice. The financial 
transactions of the Recognized Student Organizations last year 
amounted to $223,604. This amount was taken into the treasuries 
of the organizations and generally the organizations spend what 
they take in. The President has designated the Director of the 
Student Union also to be the Coordinator of Student Activity and 
requested him to plan in his next budget for a position - Assistant 
Director of the Student Union. The incumbent of this position will 
be in charge of student activities. This will enable the Univer- 
sity for the first time to coordinate in a systematic way the 
functions and operations of the student organizations. The 
fraternities and sororities are not within the scope of the RSO. 
They are individual corporations. Dr. Mather pointed out that the 
Recognized Student Activities Committee of the Board of Trustees is 
concerned also with fraternities and athletics, in addition to the 
Recognized Student Organizations. Organizations within the RSO 
have almost complete autonomy as to how they spend their money. 



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COMMITTEE 



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2201 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The only policy regulating this area is that no funds of an RSO 
organization may be expended for alcoholic beverages. 

President Mather stated that through conferences with the 
Interfraternity Council and fraternity members, it has been agreed 
that the fraternities must be placed on a more business-like basis. 
The fraternities are considering the possibility of appointing a 
business manager and are seeking to have the University collect 
their recurring bills. 

Assistant Dean of Women Gonon directs much of her 
attention to the sororities and she feels that young ladies gain 
advantages in developing the art of self-government by operating 
their sororities. However, she recognizes that oftentimes in the 
sororities there are social pressures that are detrimental to the 
girls. She pointed out that the alumni advisory group is working 
on housing standards. They are not adverse to moving onto campus 
land eventually, for the prohibition provision which would be in- 
herent in any agreement permitting fraternities and sororities to 
use University land for building purposes would not affect the 
sororities for they now have prohibition. 

Dean of Hen Hopkins discussed the problem of student 
drinking and pointed out that there is no consistent behavioral 
trend. Last year there was an improved record although this quarter 
there has been an increase in arrests for drunkenness. 

Assistant Dean Burkhardt, whose chief concern is the men's 
dormitories , whereas Dean Hopkins concerns himself with the men' s 
fraternities, said that placing housemothers in the men's dormitories 
has had salutary results. The housemothers can furnish information 
to the Dean of Men about resident students which is helpful in 



Fraternities 



Sororities 



Housemothers 



2202 



COMMITTEE 



Vending 
Machines 



Athletics 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

counselling and advising them. The big advantage of housemothers 
is in the continuity of employment as against faculty residents 
who were constantly turning over. A problem in the dormitories is 
the lack of supervision in the vending machines area. Mr. 
Burkhardt felt that the operation of snack bars rather than vend- 
ing machines might be a solution to solving the problem of mess 
that is created. 

Mr. Scott, Director of the Student Union, described the 
Union activities and operation. With the appointment of a con- 
ference coordinator, conference activities have worked smoothly. 
The present traffic in the Student Union is now between eight and 
ten thousand persons per day. 

Director McGuirk discussed the future needs of the 
Athletic Department as they pertain to an area for future inter- 
collegiate athletic contests. Because the present area must soon 
be vacated for new academic buildings and because the Master Flan 
proposal for construction of athletic fields is in the hazy future, 
Mr. McGuirk would like the University of Massachusetts Building 
Association to construct some permanent bleachers. The bleachers 
and other athletic field appurtenances such as a press box and a 
dressing room could be amortized by student athletic fees and gate 
receipts. An athletic field with a seating capacity of about 
25,000 is planned. The University now has 12,800 bleachers which 
can be moved to the new site and 10,000 to 12,000 permanent 
bleachers would be installed. 

Director McGuirk pointed out that the chief source of 
revenue from the vending machine program comes from the washing and 
drying equipment. At present the athletic program is now receiving 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

42% of the gross receipts from these types of vending machines. 

The Athletic Department would like to increase the percentage 

through ownership of such machines rather than through rentals. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to ask 
the University of Massachusetts Building 
Association to include as part of the build- 
ing equipment of the new buildings vending 
equipment consisting of washing machines and 
driers. 

Mr. Allan discussed some problems involving the ad- 
ministration of the Athletic Trust Fund. The major sources of 
Athletic Trust Fund revenue are as follows: 

1. Student fees established by the University Board 
of Trustees. 

2. Gate receipts and guarantees. 

3. Vending and concession receipts. 

The Athletic Council budget operation differs from most 
other organized University programs in that operating 
funds are not available as of July 1 from appropriation 
allocations. Therefore, balancing expenditures with 
cash receipts in the early part of the fiscal year 
presents problems. 

Since revenues from gate receipts, guarantees, vending 
and concession operations have been transferred to the 
Barber Fund for scholarship and grant-in-aid commitments, 
additional difficulties were encountered which were met 
by "borrowing" from the Barber Fund to meet operating 
expenses until other receipts were available for that 
purpose. 

Since this is a difficult and cumbersome procedure, it 
is requested that scholarship and grant-in-aid payments 
become a part of the athletic operated budget and that 
no effort be made to try to separate sources of income 
(including student fees) from items of expenditure (in- 
cluding scholarships and grants-in-aid). 

This recommendation, if approved, would provide greater 
flexibility and greater efficiency in applying available 
income and reduce operating problems that arise from 
poor weather, winless seasons, and sports schedules in genera 



2203 



Vending 
Machines 



Athletic 
Trust Fund 



Barber 
Fund 



2204 



COMMITTEE 



Athletic 
Trust Fund 



Tutoring 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
effective July 1, 1959 all receipts on 
account of the athletic program and 
activities be deposited in the Athletic 
Trust Fund and that all disbursements 
from this fund shall be in accordance 
with the approved budgets of the Univer- 
sity Athletic Council unless otherwise 
voted by the Board of Trustees. 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that it shall be the general policy of 
the University not to use student tax 
receipts or fees for scholarships to 
other students, except as approved by 
the President on an interim or emergency 
basis. 

Director McGuirk discussed the personnelneeds of the 
Athletic Department. He pointed out that no competitive college or 
university in New England has fewer than four varsity football 
coaches. This year for the first time the University of Massachu- 
setts football squad will be of competitive size of other squads on 
our schedule. We will have approximately 65 men. Three years ago 
the squad was 32 men. The size of the squad in all sports is in- 
creasing and at the University of Massachusetts we support more 
sports than other land-grant colleges throughout the country. 

Mr. Cadigan discussed the tutoring program as it now 
operates. The tutoring program for athletes has been supervised 
entirely through the efforts of athletic department members, who 
are to be commended for what they have accomplished. Supervision 
of the program is one of the responsibilities of a staff member. 
The supervisor consults with the heads of critical departments and 
obtains the names of graduate students and competent undergraduates 
who are likely prospects as tutors. He then consults these 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

prospects to line up a tutoring staff. Tutoring sessions are 
scheduled regularly from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays in one of the dormitories (Chadbourne, this year). All 
Barber Award candidates are expected to attend and attendance has 
been good. In addition, the supervisor arranges for special 
tutoring for individuals needing specialized tutoring assistance. 

Mr. Cadigan recommends that an organized system of 
tutoring at a professional level be developed for the entire 
campus. 

The committee discussed the size and complexity of the 

athletic program at the University of Massachusetts and on motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

formation of a Board of Trustees' Committee 
on Athletics. 

Mr. Leavitt stated that the Associate Alumni is in full 
agreement with the policy of the Board of Trustees' policy on the 
intercollegiate athletic program. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 




Secretary 



2205 



Trustee 
Committee on 
Athletics 



2206 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

May 15, 1959, 10:30 a.m., Worcester Room, Student 
Union, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Committee members Brett, Haigis, 
McDermott, Taber, Whitmore. 
Trustee Schuck, President Mather, 
Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson, Mr. Hugill, Construction 
& Maintenance Engineer, U of M, 
Mr. Larsen, Consulting Architect, 
U of M. 

In discussing the preliminary plans for the School of 
Business Administration, the committee reviewed a rendering of the 
buildings that would contain the School of Business Administration 
and the University administration offices. Because of the proxi- 
mity of the three buildings and because of the prominent site 
located at the southeast end of the campus on Alumni Field, all 
these buildings were considered together for aesthetic reasons. 

Only preliminary sketches were available but Treasurer 
Johnson wanted the committee to decide whether or not the archi- 
tects are going in the direction that was satisfactory to the 
Board members. 

On invitation of the committee, Mr. Campbell and 
Mr. Kauffman joined the meeting. Mr. Campbell of Campbell and 
Aldrich, while commissioned as the architects only for the first 
building of the School of Business Administration, had developed 
the complex of buildings. President Mather pointed out that the 
idea of looking at a complex of buildings even though only the de- 
sign of one has been awarded is the usual procedure. This had 
been done with the Science Center. 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion of the proposed reflection pool, 
Mr. Campbell was directed to study the feasibility of maintaining 
and operating it as described in the rendering of the building 
complex. 

Mr. Campbell estimated the square foot cost of the 
Business Administration Building at $18.00. The budget for the 
total project is $1,500,000. The Dean of the School of Business 
and the faculty committee have approved the space allocation. The 
committee recommended that Mr. Campbell continue along the lines of 
the preliminary sketches and prepare preliminary plans of the 
School of Business Administration Building for the committee's 
approval. 

Trustee Schuck announced that she had met with the 
Commissioner of Administration and he was interested in the Board 
of Trustees getting good architects. She discussed with him the 
desirability of using world famous designers. She reported that he 
is willing to appoint a world's renowned architect to work with the 
Trustees on any project they may propose. Chairman Whitmore pointed 
out that the Board of Trustees had not always been assigned the 
architects it requested and was hopeful that now the state ad- 
ministrators understand the problems of the Board - that the Board 
would get architects that it recommends. 

Miss Schuck had compiled a list of renowned architects 
and she distributed the list to the committee members. 

President Mather and Treasurer Johnson described the role 
of Mr. Larsen in the building program of the University. He is an 
eminently qualified architect and diplomat. As coordinating 



2207 



2208 



COMMITTEE 



WALTER M. 
DICKINSON 
ARMORY 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

architect, he helps the assigned architect get the total picture 
within which the new building is to be set and spells out to the 
architect the building philosophy of the University. He in- 
fluences the architect to harmonize the new buildings with the 
campus and advises the Trustees on the aesthetics of the planned 
buildings. Mr. Larsen is an authority on the use of materials and 
their arrangements. President Mather stated that the administra- 
tion is completely satisfied with the work of Mr. Larsen. 

Upon recommendation of the Faculty Committee on Naming 
Buildings and President Mather, and on motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
naming of the following buildings: 

ROTC Building - Walter M. Dickinson Armory 

Dickinson, a member of an old Amherst 
family and brother of a Trustee of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, was 
graduated from the College in 1877. Although 
most of his family were graduates of Amherst 
College, he was attracted to this institution 
because it offered military courses. After 
some years as an officer in the West in the 
wars with the Indian tribes, he returned in 
1892 to command the military detachment. 
One of the twenty- eight MAC men to enlist in 
the War with Spain, he was ordered to Cuba 
as quartermaster of the 17th Regiment. He 
was fatally wounded at El Caney on 1 July 
1898, the first alumnus of the College to be 
killed in a foreign war. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Men's Dormitory - Henry Francis Hills House 

Mr. Hills was born in Amherst in 1833 
and was for years active in civic affairs 
and in the development of the region. A 
leading spirit in the effort to bring the 
College to Amherst, he served on the 
committee to create the campus and was active 
in raising the subvention proffered by the 
Town. He was a Trustee of the College from 
1865-1878 and with his father, contributed 
$10,000 in 1867 for the upkeep of the 
Botanical Gardens. 

Women's Dormitory #16 - Mary Lyon House 

Born in Buckland, Massachusetts, in 1797, 
Miss Lyon attended The Amherst Academy, Im- 
pelled by her desire to improve educational 
opportunities for women, she founded both 
Wheaton and Mt. Holyoke Colleges. From the 
latter the foundation of five other colleges 
for women has directly stemmed. Although 
Miss Lyon was never directly connected with 
the University, her unparalleled services to 
the collegiate education of women prompted 
the Board to suggest her name as appropriate 
for a dormitory for women. 

Women's Dormitory #17 - Minnie E. Dwight House 

Minnie E. (Mrs. William G.) Dwight was an 
active member of the University Advisory Council 
of Women (1923-57). She was the first woman to 
receive an honorary degree from the University 
of Massachusetts (LL.D. 1947). 

Women's Dormitory #18 - Anna Johnson House 

Anna (Mrs. Clifton) Johnson, of Hadley, 
was appointed by President Butter field as a 
charter member of the Advisory Council of 
Women on which she served from 1921 to 1944. 
She was active in youth work. Throughout 
her active career she strongly supported the 
work of the University. 

Treasurer Johnson reported on studies that were made on 

campus pertaining to the design of dormitories. The consensus is 

that more space should be made available for clothes by means of 

closet space and bureaus. He recommended new dormitories contain 



2209 



Henry Francis 
Hills House 



Mary Lyon 
House 



Minnie E. 
Dwight House 



Anna Johnson 
House 



2210 


UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

built-in units to economize on space. It was also determined that 
students would prefer more "study rooms" and less space allocated 


s 


COMMITTEE 


for recreation rooms. These recommendations have been transmitted 
to the University of Massachusetts Building Association to be in- 
corporated in future dormitories. 

Chairman Whitmore left the meeting and Trustee Taber was 
elected chairman pro tempore. 

In considering the preliminary plans for the Engineering 
Building, the committee recommended further study of the possi- 
bility of moving the two top stories to the edge of the bottom 
story. 

The preliminary plans for the Natural Resources Building 
received committee approval and it was recommended that the archi- 
tect go onto the next step. 

After considering the preliminary plans of the Food 
Technology Building, it was decided not to approve the plans and 
require further work on the exterior design. 

The preliminary plans for the Fourth Section of the 
Science Center were approved and it was recommended that the archi- 
tect continue along the lines as presented. 

Approval of the preliminary plans for the addition to the 
Physics Building was given by the committee. 


s 




On motion duly made and seconded, it was 




Cold Storage 


VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 




Building 


it approve the final plans and specifica- 






tions of the Cold Storage Building. 


• 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMITTEE 



It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it approve the final plans and specifica- 
tions of the Infirmary. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it approve the final plans and specifica- 
tions of the Third Section of the Science 
Center. 

Treasurer Johnson showed plans now being considered for 
the purchase of approximately 600 acres for the College of Agri- 
culture. This land is not adjacent to the campus but is in the 
vicinity. A full recommendation for action will be brought to a 
later meeting. 





^UU 



Wl 



: ■_ ;„ Secretary 



J 



2211 



Infirmary 



Science Center 
third section 



College of 

Agriculture 

land 



2212 



COMMITTEE 



Fraternities 

and 
Sororities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

June 30, 1959, 10:00 a.m., 156 Stuart Street, Boston 

Chairman Brett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Cashin, Fox, 
McDermott, Taber, President 
Mather, Secretary Gillespie, 
Treasurer Johnson 

President Mather explained that reforms in fraternity 
practices are imperative. Many of the deficiencies in fraternity 
operations are due to inadequate financing and poor business 
techniques. Fraternity leaders have agreed to hire a business 
manager and have asked the University administration to assist 
them in their financial administration by collecting room and food 
charges. The President felt that the University should help as 
much as possible the fraternities get straightened out and 
recommended that the Committee on Finance permit the administration 
to assist the fraternities to this extent. 

It was suggested that students should have written 
authorization from their parents or guardians to live and/or eat 
in fraternities and sororities and authorized the President to work 
out an appropriate form to be used. Upon filing with the Univer- 
sity administration a form authorizing living and/or eating in 
fraternities and sororities, the Treasurer then could collect 
fraternity and sorority charges for room and food charges. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the President be authorized to require 
minor students who live and/or eat in 
fraternities or sororities to have written 
permission from their parents or guardians 
on a form prescribed by the President and 
stating that non-payment of room and/or 
food charges will result in the student 
being refused registration for classes at 
the University. 



f 



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COMMITTEE 



!i 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Students over twenty-one years of age will 
sign a form stating that the student agrees 
that non-payment of room and food charges 
of a fraternity or sorority may result in 
the student being refused registration for 
classes at the University. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Treasurer be authorized to collect 
fraternity and sorority room and food charges 
provided that each fraternity or sorority 
executes an agency agreement substantially 
in the form Attachment A attached to these 
minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes. The agreement is to be placed on 
file with the Treasurer. 

In order to carry out the preceding recommendations, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Treasurer be authorized to establish 
an Agency Account on the books of the 
University entitled "Fraternity Agency Fund" 
for the receipt and disbursement of fraternity 
and/or sorority charges. 

The Committee reviewed in detail the expenditures made by 

the President of unrestricted funds previously authorized by the 

Trustees and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the expenditures of the President from Un- 
restricted Income from Endowment Funds of 
$1,326.79 and from the University Fund of 
$2,437.07 through June 30, 1959 be approved. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the President spend in the year beginning 
July 1, 1959 for the furtherance of the 
University program such sums as in his 
discretion are necessary from the income on 
unrestricted Endowment Funds not to exceed 
$1,500 and such additional sums from unre- 
stricted current gifts to the University 
that are deposited in the University Fund 
as may become available not to exceed 
$2,500 for the period. 



2213 



Fraternity 
Agency Fund 



2214 



Printing 



COMMITTEE 



Trust Fund 

Overhead 

Account 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



Emily M. 
Staples - 
gift 



Student 

Union 

Budget 



Stock 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Because of inordinate limitations on printing now im- 
posed by state regulations making it virtually impossible to get 
important reports printed while the information in them is current, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the President's Annual Report and the graphic 
financial report of the Treasurer be printed 
from the Trust Fund Overhead Account in an 
amount not to exceed $3,200. 

This year the University tellers had an overage of $11.21 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the cash overage in the change fund of the 
tellers of $11.21 be written off as a 
credit to the Trust Fund Interest Account 
as of June 30, 1959. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
accept the gift of the estate of Emily M. 
Staples and that the Treasurer be 
authorized to sell the real estate and 
personal property in the best way possible. 

The securities of the University of Massachusetts Endow- 
ment Funds were reviewed and there was no recommendation for any 



i 



change . 



The budget of the Student Union was reviewed and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Student Union Budget for the fiscal 
year starting July 1, 1959, as attached to 
these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes as Attachment B be approved. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sell the Mr. 

& Mrs. Gilbert Clark Myers gift of 50 shares 
of Pepsi-Cola United Bottlers stock and trans- 
mit the proceeds to Hokkaido University as 
per agreement associated with the gift. 



The meeting adjourned at 11:5Q a.m. 




Secretary 



ATTACHMENTS 



II 



AGREEMENT 
Know all men by these presents that __ 



a fraternity (or sorority) at the University of 



I 



i 



Massachusetts (hereinafter referred to as the "Principal") has made, constituted 
and appointed, and by these presents does make, constitute and appoint the Board 
of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts (herein- 
after referred to as the "University"), acting through the Treasurer of the 
University, the true and lawful agent for and in the name, place and stead of the 
Principal to do each and all of the following acts and things: 

1. Collect the charges assessed by the Principal for room and/or 
food against certain students of the University who are members 
of said fraternity (or sorority) . A list of said charges for 

a particular semester is to be filed by the Principal with the 
Treasurer of the University on or before a due date selected 
by said Treasurer for that particular semester. This list of 
charges to bear the approval of the president or treasurer of 
the local chapter of the Principal and the Dean of Men (or 
Dean of Women in case of sororities) of the University, or 
their authorized agents. 

2. Deposit such monies so collected for the Principal in an 
Agency Account on the books of the University. 

3. Use the same procedures in collecting charges for the Principal 
as used in collecting other University charges as established 
in the policies set forth in the University Undergraduate 
Bulletin. 

4. Permit such students to register for classes without payment 
of the Principal's charges if in the opinion of the Treasurer 
of the University circumstances warrant such action. (For 
example, pending loans, schoarships, etc.) 

5. Apply any and all such student payments first to any unpaid 
University charges and the balance, if any, to charges of 
the Principal. 

6. Cancel charges of the Principal only upon the authorization of 
the president or treasurer of the local chapter of the Principal 
and the approval of the Dean of Men of the University (or Dean 
of Women in case of sororities), or their authorized agents. 

7. Refuse to make refunds to such students of charges collected for 
the Principal. Any such refunds will be made by the Principal. 

8. Pay to the Principal, or his designated Agent, on or before 
registration day of each semester the amount collected to 
date on the Principal's charges. This will be accompanied 
by a report listing each payee's name and the amount 
collected. 



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STUDENT UNION BUDGET 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 
JULY 1, 1959 to JUNE 30, 1960 



June 24, 1959 



ATTACHMENTS 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
STUDENT UNION 
GENERAL FUND BUDGET 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 1959 to JUNE 30, I960. 



INCOME - (GROSS) 





1958-59 
Budget 


1958-59 
Est. Actual 


1959-60 

Budget 


* Student Fees 


$107,900. 


$101,000. 




$112,320. 


Senate-Stud. Act. (R.S.O.) 


5,750. 


5,750. 




7,000. 


Transfers - Foods $20,000. 
Store 10,000. 
TOTAL 


$20,000. 

10.000, ft 

30,000. 30,000. 


$30,000. 

15.000. 

45,000. 


Conference-Lodgings 
Meal 8 
Rentals 
Registrations 
Misc. 


«•»«•■»•»•»>• 


m»mm*mmm 






TOTAL 


$ 60,000. 


$ 63,000. 


$ 70,000. 


Games 


35,000. 


33,000. 




35,000. 


Rentals & Cust. Fees 


5,000. 


4,000. 




3,000. 


Office Serv. & Misc. Inc. 
TOTAL - OPERATING INCOME 


3.665. 
$247,315. 


4,000. 
$240,750. 




4,000. 
$276,320, 


Unexpended Income 




7,765. 
$248,515. 




..-.-• 




$247,315. 


$276,320. 



* Student Fees 

Summer $ 5,000. $ 5,000. 

Regular 96,000. 

Stockbridge 102,000. 7,220. 

Graduate 3,600. 

Others (Music, etc.) 900. 500 . 

$107,900. $112,320. 

(JJ Spec. Transfer also $ 20,000. not included. 



, ■• 



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I 



\... ■■-. 



I 



GENERAL FUND BUDGET 



1 



ADMINISTRATIVE EXP . 

Regular Payroll 

Student Payroll 

Office Supplies 
. Stationery & Printing 

Telephone 

Travel & Conv, 

Misc. 

Repair to Off. Mach, 

TOTAL 

MAI NTENANCE EXP f 
Regular Payroll 
Student Payroll 
Oust. Supplies 
Repairs & Parts 
Labor & Services. Misc. 
TOTAL 

GAMES EXP. • 
Regular Payroll 
Student Payroll 
Supplies 

Repairs & Maint, 
Rental - Pinsetters 
Misc. 
TOTAL 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
Regular Payroll 
Student Payroll 
Program 
Supplies 
Misc. 
TOTAL 



1959-60 



EXPENSES 

1958-59 
Budget 



P. 2 



$ 35,337. 

500. 

1,000. 

150. 

75. 

500, 

750. 

100 T 

$ 38,412. 



$ 24,100. 

1,500, 

4,000. 

2,000, 

500. 

$ 32,100. 



$ 11,067. 
1,700. 
2,000. 
1,000. 
3,840. 



$ 19,607. 



$ 4,316. 

400. 

7,661. 



1958-59 
Est. Actual 



34,000. 
200. 
1,000. 
100. 
50. 
550. 
750. 
300, 



$ 36,950. 

$ 23,500. 

1,800. 

5,000. 

3,000. 

200. 

$ 33,500. 

$ 9,000. 

2,500. 

2,500. 

1,500. 

3,840. 

50. 

$ 19,390. 



$ 4,650, 

325 , 

7,250, 



1959-60 
Budget 



$ 12,377. 



$ 12,225. 



$ 28,186. 

200. 

1,000. 

150. 

50. 

500. 

750. 

300. 

$ 31,136. 



$ 26,973. 

1,200. 

5,000. 

3,000. 

200. 

$ 36,373. 



$ 15,570. 

1,500. 

2,500. 

1,500, 

3,840. 

50. 

$ 24,960. 



$ 17,694. 

200. 

7,550. 

495, 

355. 

$ 26,294. 






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I 



GENERAL FUND BUDGET 



1959-60 



P. 3 



1 



1 



CONFERENCES EXP. 
Regular Payroll 
Student Payroll 
Meals 

Housing & Rentals 
Linen 

Other Labor 
Travel 
Misc. 
TOTAL 

OFFICE SERVICES & MISC. EXP . 
Regular Payroll 
Student Payroll 
Supplies & other 
TOTAL 

RENTAL TO STATE TREAS. 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSE 

Reserves 

Cap, Equipment 



EXPENSES 

1958-59 
Budget 



$ 56,451. 



600. 

1.100. 

$ 1,700. 

80. 000 r 
$240,647. 



1958-59 

_E8t. Actual 



$ 59,000. 

1,200. 

250. 

1.000. 

$ 2,450. 

80.000. 

$243,515. 



4,000. 


4,000. 


2,168. 


1,000. 


500 r 


mmmMi 


$247,315. 


$248,515. 



1959-60 

3tidget i 



$ 69,000. 

1,261. 

250. 

1.0 00. 

$ 2,511. 

80.000. 

$270,274. 

5,000. 
1,046. 

$276, 320. 



t . 4 



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GENERAL FUND - CAPITAL CASH ACCOUNT 1959-60 BUDGET DATA P 4 

1 



1958 



Free Reserve 
Capital Fund Total 



1959 

3/31 Transfer from Foods 20 000.00 

6/30 Estimated Transfer 4 QOO 00 

to Reserve ' * 



operating deficit resulting 
from unrealized fee income 
estimate. 



7/1 Capital Account Balance $ 12,256.93 $ 1,884.96 $ 14,141.89 



20,000.00 
4,000.00 



6/30 Required from Free Capital ^7,765.00^1 ^f 765 00^ 

account due to 1958-59 V J ' _ J ^J * 1) 



6/30 Estimated New Balance $ 24,491.93 $ 5,884.96 $ 30,376.89 



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I 7 ! 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

August 4, 1959, 11:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Haigis, Schuck, 
Kiernan, Crowley, Mather. Also, 
Secretary Gillespie and Treasurer 
Johnson 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the new undergraduate courses, 
the course changes and the deletion of 
courses and the new courses listed in 
Attachment A attached to these minutes and 
hereby made a part of these minutes, with 
the exception of the courses in Applied 
Music. 

The President discussed the undergraduate program that the 
University established with General Electric at Pittsf ield. He ex- 
plained that the graduate program at Pittsfield will be expanded 
during the 1959-60 academic year. No new programs will be offered 
but two of those already available at Amherst will be made available 
to qualified students in the Pittsfield area. These are the Master 
of Science in Electrical Engineering program and the Master of 
Business Administration program. Interested citizens and groups in 
the Pittsfield area have sponsored the undertaking and plan to en- 
large it on a permanent basis for the Berkshire County area. All 
students will be held to exactly the same admission and degree re- 
quirements as though they were taking their work at the Amherst 
campus. It is anticipated that in future years, the program will 
be enlarged to include additional fields. General Electric will 
continue to underwrite the graduate program on the same basis as in 



2215 



New 
Courses 



General 
Electric 



2216 



COMMITTEE 



Four College 
Cooperat ive 
Agreement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the past. Courses will be open to all qualified students who wish 

to attend. 

President Mather discussed the development of a 

cooperative Ph.D. degree program with Amherst, Mt. Holyoke and 

Smith Colleges. It is a goal of the University of Massachusetts 

to become the graduate center in western Massachusetts. The report 

of the committee to discuss four-college cooperation at the 

graduate level is attached to these minutes and hereby made a part 

of these minutes. On recommendation of the President and on 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
accept the report of the committee to 
discuss four-college cooperation at the 
graduate level. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




Secretary 



^^'A 



KEW UHDERGMBUATE COURSES 
COURSE CHARGES 
DELETIOH OF COURSES 



Hew Undergraduate Courses 

Accounting 98 - Theory of Accounts. The development of Account ing 
Principles or Standards followed by an intensive study of the contro- 
versial aspects of income determination and the presentation of a firm's 
financial position. 
3 class horn's Credit 3 

Ajgriculfeural Eagineeriag 53 - Food Service Facilities Planning. Space 
organisation and equipment layouts} decisions and planning relative to 
facilities, utilities and materials handling. 
2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory Credit 3 

Agronomy 65 - (X) Heed Control, tfeed infestation, ccsEoa weeds, identifi- 
cation end principles of control. Special emphasis oa the choaaical control 



I 



3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1, 2 and Botany 1 

A nimal So £enca_7S - Milk Secretion (X). Lactation in all its aspects, in- 
cluding the gross and microscopic anatomy of the mansaary gland in its de- 
velopjZEurs from birth through active secretion and involution, the endocrine 
control of milk secretion, and practical applications in managing the 
daisy herd. 

1 class hour; 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit 2 

Animal Science 91 (I), 92 (IX) - Special Problems in Animal Science. 
Problem siork under the supervision of a staff member, intended to intro- 
duce qualified Seniors to research methods in some phase of animal science, 
such as nutrition, genetics, reproduction, meats or histology. 

Credit 1-3 

Arboriculture 31 ( I) - Principles of Arboriculture. Development of 
municipal and private shade tree programs. General maintenance of shade 
and ornamental trees covering transplanting, pruning, fertilizing, use of 
pesticides, bracing and cabling, and the use of desirable tree species. 
Student Insurance Policy costing $18.00 per year is mandatory. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory Credit 3 

Art 32 - Basic Design (continuation of Art 31) An introduction to the 

elements and principles of tc?e and three-dimensional design and their 
iasginative application to visual presentation. Color theory and use. 
6 studio hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Art 31 

Art 57, 58 - Printmakingo A basic study of the materials, techniques and 
aesthetic considerations peculiar to the graphic media of lithography and 
the intaglio print (etching, aquatint, engraving, etc.), permitting the 
student to create and prist his own cork. 

6 studio hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Art 31 and 32, or permission of instructor. 



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ArtJ£9 - stoderai Painting aad Sculpture. The origin of the modem raove- 
xaents in art, and an analysis of the contemporary techniques and styles 
as they relate to society. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Art 81 - Kodern Architecture. A history of the change in style, technical 
advances, and aesthetic principles during the past two hundred year. Bon- 
technical in nature* 
3 class hoars Credit 3 

Bacteriology §5 - Virology, She nature and properties of the animal, 

plant and bacterial viruses. 

2 class hours; I 3-hcttr laboratory Credit 3 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor 

Biology 1 and 2. Introduction t© the principles of biology as applied to 
plant© and orgonissis in terms of their origin, structure and functions. 
Credit is sot given without eos^letion of both semesters in sequence. 
Students rchc have received credit for Botany 1 or Zoology 1 may not take 
this course. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory Credit 3 
1 qudtc discussion hour 

Civil. Engineering 97 (IX) - Introduction to Hydrodynamics. A mathematical 
treatment of the basic theorems of classical hydrodynajsics - potential 
flow, ccaforajal mapping, wave and vorteic motion, K&vier-Steltes equations 
aad boundary layer theory. 

3 class hours Credit 3 
Prerequisite: Katbamatics 32 

Finance S4 - Security Analysis. An esSHanation of the factors affecting 
investment values of securities and the methods used in their analysis. 
Studoats are required to select ease industrial group for intensive in- 
vestigation. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

German 11 - German Literature to the Age of EnlxghtesasBat. A survey of 
the earlier German literature, focusing on the Middle Ages, the Reforma- 
tion, sod the Baroque, and ending with the rise of Eationalism, 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: German 25 and 26 or equivalent 

Gergsaaa 78 - German Literature since 1770. A continuation ef German 77, 

dealing tilth the major literary sEovssjents f reus the Enlightenment to the 

present. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: German 25 and 26 or equivalent 

Gcv er n a ea t 6fe . - She Law and Practice of Civil Liberties. A study of the 

davelcpsESXit in American Constitutional Law of the concept ©f civil liberty, 

Inelud&Eg the following fields: Free speech and religion, fair trial, and 

race discrimination. She functions of courts in protection of these 

liberties. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Government 25 (Americas Government) 



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History 94 iiii (I,aad II) - Sera&aar ia j&sisrican History. A problem course 
intended to give training in historical research and writing, with 
special attest ion to the use o£ source materials. The field of study 
will vary froat semester to semester, depending upon the instructor. In- 
tended primarily for History sssjors but open to others by permission. 
Komally limited to 12-15 students. 

3 class, hoars Credit 3 

Prsreqsisi&e: History 25, 26 

History... 95 ..(I and . IX). - Seminar in European Hisfcory. Similar to History 94 

but dealing with fields of European history. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: History 5, 6 

HaaagaKaBt €8 - tSaaagessnt-Unioa Belations IX. A study of the human rela- 
tions problems encountered ia the {negotiation and administration of 
tsasaffigssBnt-sanioa agreeiseats. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: ManagsiBeKt 67 or consent of instructor 

75 - Credits and Collections. She principles and practices of 



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mercantile and retail credit ssaaageaaent Including the sources and analysis 
of credit information, collection procedures and control and the rights 
of creditors. 
3 elass hours Credit 3 

Magheting 84 - Problems in Advertising. She application of basic Hisrket- 
is3g knowledge in planning and analysing advertising campaigns. Other 
significant problems such as research appropriations, the detersaination of 
the advert isles budget, the choice of media and the subsequent steasurejaent 
of their effectiveness, the prsgaasation of copy and layout will be considered. 
Prerequisite: Market ins 53 ajsd 73. Credit 3 

Mathcaaaati cs^^ ^11) « Synthetic Projective Geometry. An ox&esatic study 
(es^hasising synthetic taethods and sot restricted to the plane) of 
geesagtsic properties invariant under projection. 
3 class hoars Credit 3 

Prere^wisite: llatheisatics 4 

Hsfehfiatatie s 58 - Introduction to Digital Cossputers. She basic digital 
coa^satisg system, introductioB to Boolean Algebra, logical design of 
computers, programming, coding, utility progress, criteria for evaluation 
of computers. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: MathejEStics SO or psasaissiosi of instructor 

Mathemati cs, ,68 ill) - Vector Spaces. The analytic gesiaetry of a-dissensionai 
space in vector fonaulatioa mth special reference to characteristic values, 
characteristic vectors, Heaaitias fosss and the unitary group; brief ssention 
of the generalisation to infinite dimensional spaces. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 30 or 32 



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^£^^S£l£S-§L-iSl. " Gon^plex, Analysis, The Algebra of ecasples numbers, 
she elemeiitasy functions and their ssappings, diffeffg&n&a&ioa* integration, 

TayXess series, arsd residues. 

3 class tears Credit 3 

Pg«SB8B5uislt:e: Mathematics 92 or 32 

M uslg^i - Applied Jfatsie 

Credit 6 

tJ&y&JI w IsstztMEeatal Ensermle. IsMs is a two-semester course for 1 

credit. 'Sheets is so credit fez 1. sstaestar. 

Credit 1 
Prerequisite: Permission of She isseriictor 

MKSJJLM "* Instrumental Easesfole. Ihis is a tso-sesaeseer coarse for 1 
credit. Three hours rehearsal. So credit for 1 semester. 

Credit i 

Prerequisite: PesaaissiGn of the instructor 

Ktts.ic.2g - Vocal Ensemble. This is a two-semester coarse for 2 credit. 

There is no credit for 1 semester, 

Preraqaisite: Permission of the instructor Credit 1 

Magic 30 - ?©cal Enserable. This is a two-semester ©ours® for 1 credit. 
Three feear© rehearsal „ Bo credit for 1 semester. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor Credit 1 

Stasis 53., 54 - Historical SEmrey ©f l&ssic. A survey of the history and 
litaras&re of asusic frosa early religious chant throssgh X@50; and fr©?a 1750 

throKgh vocal and instrnmesgEal emsle of the 20th Csstissy. Seadissg, 
listeisi^§, score stady,* 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Preseqaisites Hasic 13 or coasent of instructor 

Otei© 53 got gsrereqaisite to tesic 54) 

*tassie Major reqaireiseigt 

Music 57 - Basic Instrumental Music. The study of tone produce ion and 
acoustical principles of the woodwind gsoup. Literature and materials 
are discussed, evaluated, sad assigned for reports. The basic philosophy 
of instrumental music instruction will be presented and related to the 
total sassicsl development of the individual. 

3 class hours Credit 2 

Prerequisite: Music 2 

Music n 5S - Basic Instrumental Music - Brasswind and Percussion Instruments. 
The study of tone production and acoustical principles of the brasswind 
and percussion instruments. Literature and materials are discussed, 
evaluated and assigned for reports. There will be a limited approach to 
the factors inherent in ensemble performance. 

3 class hours Credit 2 

Prerequisite: Music 2 



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Music 63 - History and Literature of Music from Monteverdi to Bach 
and Handel. A study of the Baroque and Rococo Periods* including the 
music of such coEsposers as Monteverdi, Schuts, Freseobaldl, Lully, 
Pachelbel, Purcell, Corelli, Couperin, Rameau, the Scarlett is, Bach, 
and Handel. Reading, listening, score study. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Music 53 or consent of instructor 

Music 64 - Haydn, Mosarfc and Beethoven. Viennese classic and pre-classic 
music. Reading, listening, score study. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Music 54 or consent of instructor 

Music 65, 66 - Applied Music. 

Prerequisite: Music 46 Credit 1 each 

Mag ic 67 - Basic Instrumental Music - String Instruasents. The study of tone 
production and acoustical principles of the string group. Literature and 
materials are discussed, evaluated, and assigned for reports. The basic 
problems peculiar to the strings are presented. 
3 class hours Credit 2 

Prerequisite: Music 2 

Music 73 - Gothic and Renaissance Vocal Music. Historical study of 
polyphonic and hoznophonic vocal music, from organum through motet and 
madrigal. Reading, listening, score study, analysis. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Music 53 and consent of instructor 

Music 74 - Music of the Sixth Century. An historical study of music in 
various media, and small and large forms, including Lieder, chamber music, 
symphony, opera. Reading, listening, score study. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Music 54 or consent of instructor 

Music 77 (Ij,..JJLlX ~ Music Curriculum. A study of the organisation and 

administration of a music education program in the elementary and 
secondary schools. 

By arrasgGiasnt within modified Education Block Program. Credit 3 
For Music Majors this replaces Education 86. 

Music S3 (I) - Music of the SXfch Century. Systeasstlc and historical study 
of oslody, harmony, tonality, counterpoint, fcrja, orchestration, and style 
generally. Ravel, Bartok, Stravinsky, Sekoaberg, and others. American 
Music. Reading, listening, score study. Analysis. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Music 53, 54; or Music 2, or consent of instructor 

Music S5« .86 - Applied Music 

Prerequisite: Music 66 Credit 1 each 



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M^i£L§L>»i!§ " Sco1:e Readies and Conducting. Open and closed scores are 
studied and played at the keyboard. Basic conduct ins patterns and 
techniques are evolved. 
3 class hours Credit 3 each 

Prerequisite: Stosic 62 

ghil psophy^C^.^II) - Political Philosophy. A critique and attesapt to de- 
velop the sacral basis for the organisation of human life ©n the levels of 
national; state and of world government, with special reference to the 
crisis in the present system of national state sovereignties and the con- 
crete proposals for its resolution. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Two seraester courses in philosophy, or 
the approval of the instructor on the basis of studies 
in political theory or political history. 

Public JgtllitiBs m 71 - The nature, organisation and administration of 
regulated industries covering aspects of public regulation on Federal, 
State and local levels as they affect service operations. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Russian S3 - Dostoevski. Approved for 1959-60 only. 

A study of the important works of Bostoevski. Emphasis will be placed on 
their intrinsic artistic merits and on their importance for the development 
of the author'© thought and the literary trends of the time. Lectures will 
include historical a*sd litai-ary background in so far «s necessary for an 
understanding of the works discussed. The student mil be guided toward 
independent research, mature class presentation, and discussion. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Ko knowledge of Biaseiaa 
required except for Russian majors. 

Russian 5fe - Tolstoy. Approved for 1959-60 only. 

A study of the important works of Tolstoy. Emphasis will be placed on 
their intrinsic artistic user its and on their importance for the development 
of the author's thought and literary trends of the time. Lectures will in- 
clude historical and literary background in so far as necessary for an under- 
standing of the works discussed. The student will be guided toward inde- 
pendent research, mature class presentation, &ad discussion. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. &© knowledge of Russian 
required except for Russian majors. 

Speech SI - Phonetics. A scientific study of the production of the sounds 
of English; analysis and description of individual vowels and consonants. 
Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet; training in auditory 
discr Sminat ion. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Speech, 82 ,(!£) - Introduction to Clinical Practice. Training in basic 
diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for various speech handicaps; emphasis 
on articulation defects, delayed speech and stuttering. Supervised clinical 
practice required. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Speech SI, 85 



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Sgeech 83. (I) - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Bearing 
Hechanisra. A study of the anatomy and physiology of the speech and hear- 
ing sEechanisis. Consideration of pronation, resonance, articulation and 
audition. 

3 class hoars Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Zoology 37, 38, or equivalent 

Spgggh 84 (II) - Audiology. A study of the symptoms and causes of hearing loss; 
special attention to diagnostic test procedures. Supervised practice in 
audioiaetric testing. Observation; field trips. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Speech 85 

Speech, 85 (i) - Introduction to Speech Pathology. A study of the causes, 
functional and organic, of speech problems among children and adults; 
principles of diagnosis and therapy. Observation; field trips. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Psychology 26 



Course jChan&es 

Agricultural En gineering _81 (181) - Elements of Food Engineering I in place 
of Agricultural Engineering 80, Food Process Engineering. 

Agricultural Engineering S2_ i CI82)revised to Elements of Food Engineering II. 

^Mg^.-S_ gigMg.-5^!_ill ). - Meat Processing - increased from 2 to 3 credits. 

Aniraal Scie nce 56 ( II) - Livestock Production - increased from 3 to 4 credits. 

Animal Science 78 (II) - Dairy Cattle Production 78 - increased from 3 to 
4 credits. 

Animal Science 79 (I) - Light Horse Management - decreased from 3 to 2 credits. 

Baawffiploay, 90 - Evolution « increased from 2 to 3 credits. 

Matfaaaati cs 83 - change in nuss'eer from Mathematics 77 - Numerical Analysis (I). 

Math ematics 84 - change in number from Mathematics 7© * Eaaerical Analysis (II). 

Mathematics 93 5 . change in number from Mathematics 91 - Fourier Series and 
Osthogonai Functions. 

Mathematics- 94 II - change in number from Mathematics 92 - Theoretical 
Advanced Calculus. 

Eursing 51 - Medical and Surgical Eursing I - increased from 16 to 17 credits. 

Pursing 60 -Medical and Surgical Horsing II « increased from 16 to 18 credits. 



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Sursi i gg_.52B {I) - Eursing of Children II - decreased from 10 to 5 credits. 

Eursing 54 (II) - Psychiatric Hursing - decreased from 10 to 8 credits. 

Nursing 57 - Maternity Narsing - increased from 10 to 16 credits. 

Karsing,„5 g_.(II> - Public Health Kersing - increased from 6 to 8 credits. 

Karsisg , 66 (II) - Senior Kursing Seminar - changed from 4 credits to 
3 or 4 credits. 

Physical E ducation 80 (I) and (IX) - Driver Education Instructor Course - 
iaereased from 2 to 3 credits. 

All Olericulture, Pomology, Floriculture and Horticulture courses t*ili 
now be listed as Horticulture courses tvdth appropriate numbers. 

Dele tion of. Courses 

Agricultural Engineering 80 - Food Process Engineeris®, 
Animal Science 74 - Advanced Meats 
^ Animal Science 77 (I) - Dairy Cattl© Production 
Animal Science 81 $1) - Seminar 
Food Technology 85 - Marine Products Technology 
Food Technology 86 - Marin© Products Technology 
Food Te chnology §6 - Introductory Research Methods 
Feed Management 68 - Kitchen Administration 
Forestry 62 - The Management of Small Woodlands 
German 58 - Middle High German 
CeajgojBS - German Literature 

Mathemati cs 60 - Spherical Trigonometry and Solid Analytic Geometry 
Mathematics 81 - Differential Geometry 



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ma Gmsa&m courses 



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EactcriolO(gy_207 - Advanced Virology. Credits changed ta read "3 to 5" 
and that prerequisites be as follows: Bacteriology 9& and perrai3sion of 
instructor. The e::tra credits will be given for laboratory work ia the 
form of a problem. 

History, 200 - Special Problems ia History. Directed research and writing 

for qualified students. 

Prerequisite-,, permission of instructor Credit 1-3 

History 257 - Seminar ia American History, 1880-1930. Training iu 

historical research. 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor Credit 3 



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REPORT OP THE COMMITTEE TO DISCUSS 
FOUR COLLEGE COOPERATION AT THE GRADUATE LEVEL 



The Committee recommends that a cooperative Ph. D. 
program be established by Amherst, Mount Holyoke and 
Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts. 
The degree would be awarded by the University of Massa- 
chusetts but some and perhaps much and in a few excep- 
tional cases even all of the work leading to the degree 
might be done in one or more of the other institutions. 

When a student has been awarded a degree under 
this program, the fact that it is a cooperative Ph, D. 
degree involving Amherst, Mount Holyoke and Smith Col- 
leges and the University of Massachusetts is to be in- 
dicated on the diploma, the permanent record card and 
all transcripts, as well as on the Commencement Pro- 
gram. 

The requirements fcr the degree would be identi- 
cal to those for the Ph. D. degree at the University 
of Massachusetts* except for the statement relating to 
"residence". For the cooperative Ph. D. degree "resi- 
dence" is defined as the institution where the thesis 
work is being done. 

Graduate Faculty membership would be open to 
qualified Individuals belonging to any of the four 

* U. of M. Ph.D. requirements are included in Appendix 1 



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Faculties. The method of election to the Graduate 
Faculty Is listed in Appendix 2, 

The Graduate Council (subject to approval by the 
Board of Trustees) would determine general policy, 
approve courses and degree requirements, set admission 
policies, appoint thesis committees and in general ad- 
minister all aspects of the cooperative Ph, D. program 
just as it does the other advanced degrees at the 
University of Massachusetts, Faculty members from 
Amherst, Mount Holyoke and Smith would retain member- 
ship on the Graduate Council, The members of the 
Council would be selected in accordance with estab- 
lished procedures of the various institutions. 

Participation in the cooperative Ph, D. program 
by departments of the four institutions would be on a 
voluntary basis. Representatives of interested cor- 
responding departments in the four colleges should 
discuss the program as it relates to them. If they 
elect to offer the cooperative Ph, D. degree they 
should petition the Graduate Council, In studying 
the proposals the Council should give careful atten- 
tion to such factors as faculty interest in research 
and teaching advanced courses, graduate curriculum, 
equipment and facilities, library resources, funds 
for fellowships and other factors which might influ- 



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ence the success of the undertaking. 

Participation by individual faculty members would 
also be on a voluntary basis. Faculty time required 
for the work involved in the cooperative Ph. D. program 
should be taken into consideration when calculating 
service loads. The problem of extra compensation 
should not be raised because the work would be done as 
part of a total program. On the other hand, if a mem- 
ber of one Faculty were to offer a graduate course at 
another of the four institutions compensation would be 
arranged according to the plan already in force. 

Course work for the cooperative Ph. D. degree 
could be taken at any of the four institutions. Tui- 
tion charges would be handled exactly as they now are 
for the interchange of students at the undergraduate 
level. 

The search for graduate fellowship support for 
the cooperative Ph. D. candidate would be the respon- 
sibility of the major professor and his department. 
Any of the four colleges could provide graduate ass is t- 
antships. The provision of equipment to be used by 
cooperative Ph. D. candidates would be the responsi- 
bility of the major professor and his department. 
The Committee reoognlzes the possibility that there 
'fcay be Inshanoee of sharing but does not recommend 



_4- 



joint ownership of ordinary laboratory equipment. Spec- 
ial cases of unusually expensive items could be discus- 
sed if the need arose. 

The Committee recommends that as soon as the co- 
operative Ph. D. program has been approved, groups of 
departments in all four institutions which have ex- 
pressed an interest in cooperation at the Ph. D. level 
be invited to submit applications to the Graduate Coun- 
cil. We are confident that as soon as the plan is an- 
nounced many other groups of corresponding departments 
in the four institutions will show an interest in the 
program and will eventually participate in it. 



The Committee recommends that each of the four 
institutions continue to offer the Masters Degree on 
an individual basis,, This would not preclude coopera- 
tive effort along the lines already familiar at the 
undergraduate level, It would also be possible, of 
course, for a Masters candidate at any of the institu- 
tions to apply for admission to the cooperative Ph, D, 
program. 



Ralph A. Beebe, Amherst College 

Lucy W. Pickett, Mount Holyoke 

College 
Kenneth Sherk, Smith College 



Gilbert L. Woods ide, University of 

Massachusetts 



February 9, 1959 



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Appendix 1 
Ph.D. Requirements at the University of Massachusetts 



In order to provide proper direction for the Ph.D. 
candidate, a Guidance Committee of three will be ap- 
pointed, or if necessary reappointed., for each student 
as soon as possible after his first registration as a 
candidate for the doctorate, and not later than two 
months after his first registration. This Committee 
will be appointed by the Scholarship Committee of the 
Graduate Council from members of the Graduate Faculty, 
recommended by the Department Head of the student's 
major department, and will consist of two members of 
the major department and one other person. 

This Guidance Committee shall meet with the candi- 
date as soon as possible after the appointment has 
been made. At least three weeks prior to the candi- 
date's second registration the Committee shall file In 
the Graduate Office a summary of the proposed major 
and minor program of the student, including specific 
courses recommended by the Committee In addition to 
this original meeting with the student, the Guidance 
Committee's responsibilities shall be to: 

a. Plan the entire Graduate School program 
of the student. 

b. Arrange for the preliminary written com- 
prehensive examination of the student. 

c. Plan for the satisfying of the language 
requirement by the student. 

d. Supervise the thesis project and arrange 
for the final examination. The Guidance 
Committee will serve as the Thesis Commit- 
tee for the Ph.D. candidate 

e. Report the fulfillment of all requirements 
to the head of the major department; the 
vote of the Committee to be unanimous on 
this, 

The degree Is conferred upon graduate students 
who have met the following requirements : 

1, The preparation of a dissertation satisfactory to 
the Guidance Committee and the major department. 

2. The successful completion of graduate courses in 
the major field and in a minor field or fields related 



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to, but not part of the major field. The Guidance Com- 
mittee will determine the number of graduate credits 
which the student must earn in the major and minor fields 
provided that at least 15 credits must be earned in the 
minor field. 

3. The passing of a preliminary written comprehensive 
examination in the major and minor fields, supplemented 
by an oral examination at the option of the major de- 
partment, both examinations to be conducted by the 
major department, to be passed not later than eight 
months before the completion of the candidate's work. 

The department in which the student has enrolled 
for courses in the minor field has a choice of submitting 
questions for the comprehensive examination or the certi- 
fying of the student as having satisfied all the require- 
ments of each course, except that the examination is re- 
quired for all courses where the grade in the course was C. 

If the student fails a part of the comprehensive 
examination he may be permitted to make up the deficiency 
under the direction of his Guidance Committee. In caso 
of failure of the entire comprehensive examination, a can- 
didate may be permitted a second and final opportunity but 
not within twelve months. 

*!•* Satisfying the following language requirements: two 
languages, foreign to the candidate and not in the same 
linguistic group, as recommended by the major department. 
Proficiency tests should be passed as early as possible '. 
and must be passed prior to the preliminary examination. 

5« The passing of a final examination, at least partly 
oral, oonducted by the Guidance Committee primarily upon, 
but not limited to, the contents of the candidate's dis- 
sertatlon e It cannot be scheduled until all members of 
the Thesis Committee have approved the thesis. The oral 
examination is to be conducted by the Thesis Committee. 
The Examining Committee is to consist of the Thesis Com- 
mittee, the Dean of the Graduate School, the Dean of the 
School or College in which the department is located, and 
such members of the major department as the head shall ap- 
point. In order to pass, the candidate must receive the 
unanimous vote of the Thesis Committee. Wot more than one 
dissenting vote shall be allowed for the total Examining 
Committee present. 

6. Satisfying the residence requirement. Three years be- 
yond the bachelor's degree are required. The equivalent of 
at least one academic year of full-time graduate work must 
be spent at the University of Massachusetts. No credit is 
valid aftep nine years. 

7.' All fees and expenses must be paid before the degree 
will be conferi^ed. 



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-7- -Footnote- 

1 Graduate Reading Examination in Foreign Languages 

1. A Graduate Reading Examination will be given 

by the German and Romance Language Departments upon 
written request from the head of the department in 
which the student in question is doing his graduate 
work. The request should be sent to the head of the 
language department concerned, via the Dean of the 
Graduate School, at least ten days before the exami- 
nation is to be administered. 

2. The examination will be given three times during 
the academic year. 

3. Prior to the administration of the reading exam- 
ination the student may, if he and the representa- 
tive of the language department agree, have a brief, 
Informal Interview so that it can be determined 
whether he has reached the point at which he is like- 
ly to deal competently with Ph.D. reading material in 
the foreign language. 

^. The examination will be a written test of the 
student's ability to translate with mature compre- 
hension from the foreign language into English. The 
use of a dictionary will be permitted. 

5. The examination will consist of passages taken 
from books and/or journals pertaining to the major 
field in which the graduate student is working. 

6. A committee of three members of the language de- 
partment concerned will grade the examination. 

7. The Graduate Office, the head of the department 
requesting the examination, and the graduate student 
concerned will be notified within ten days of the 
examination whether the student has passed or failed. 

8. In case of failure, a study period of at least 
four months will be required before a re-examination 
may be given, unless otherwise agreed upon. In the 
case of repeated failure, the candidate will not be 
admitted to the examination for the fourth time un- 
less the language department concerned is satisfied 
that he has made adequate progress. 



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Appendix 2 
The Graduate Faculty 



Members of the Graduate Faculty are selected In 
the following manner; A Department Head recommends the 
name of the prospective member to the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School by letter, which must have the approval of 
the Dean of the Faculty member's school or college. 
The recommendation must be accompanied by a form which 
has been filled out by the Department Head, 

The general criteria of membership on the Gradu- 
ate Faculty: 

1. Membership on the faculty of a graduate 
degree-granting college, or school, pro- 
viding approved graduate courses. 

2. Graduate training, 
3» Productive research 

4. Professional activity and interests. 

The qualifications of the individual are assessed 
by a committee of the Graduate Counoil. The Qualifi- 
cations Committee then recommends to the entire Graduate 
Council whose affirmative vote is necessary for admis- 
sion to the Graduate Faculty. 

The duties of the Graduate Faculty would include 
the following: s 

1. Direct the research for all advanced degrees. 

2. Constitute thesis committees for all ad- 
vanced degrees, 

3» Elect, subject to the approval of the Presi- 
dent, certain members of the Graduate School 
Council 

^-. Vote on the qualifications of candidates 
for all advanced degrees. 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

October 2, 1959, 10:00 a.m., President's Office 
University of Massachusetts 

Chairman Whitmore, presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Haigis, Taber, 
Whitmore, President Mather, 
Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson; also Mr. Hug ill and 
Mr. Lars en 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the ex- 
tension of contract from June 6, 1959 to 
June 22, 1959, Eastern Tree and Landscape 
Corporation, on site preparation, grading, 
etc., Women's Athletic Field - Account No. 
8258-37. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 

accept contract No. 13 Project U-702, Addition 
to Electrical Distribution System, as completed, 
in accordance with the plans and specifications 
by Collins Electric Company on July 29, 1959. 

The preliminary plans for the fourth section of the 
Science Center were discussed. The preliminary plans received 
Committee approval and it was recommended that the architects go 
on to the next step. 

The preliminary plans for the Business Administration 
Building were examined. After long consideration, it was decided 
not to approve the plans as presented and to request the architect 
to submit a model of the building so that it may be seen in its 
proper perspective. 

After considering the preliminary plans of the Food 
Technology Annex the Committee approved them and it was recommended 
that the architect go on to the next step. 



2217 



Women' s 

Athletic 

Field 



Electric 

Distribution 

System 



2218 



COMMITTEE 



Science 
Center 



Infirmary 



Dining 
Commons 



Engineering 
Shop 



Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In considering the preliminary plans for the Engineering 
Building, the Committee gave its approval and recommended that the 
architect go on to the next step. 

Final plans for the third section of the Science Center 

were considered. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
approve jfhe final plans and specifications of 
the third section of the Science Center. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
approve the final plans and specifications of 
the Infirmary. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
approve the final plans and specifications, 
subject to approval of technical details, of 
the Dining Commons addition. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
approve the final plans and specifications of 
the Engineering Shop. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
accept the final plans and specifications, 
subject to technical corrections, of Dormitories 
#20 and #21. 

Due to lengthy discussions on items under consideration 

on the agenda, the Committee was unable to inspect for acceptance tjie 

Library addition, Dormitories #16 and #17, Lincoln Apartments #5 

and #11, and the Women's Athletic Field, nor was it able to view 

the land acquisition for the College of Agriculture. To handle 

these items the Committee agreed to meet on October 16 at 12 o'clocjc 

at the University of Massachusetts. 



COMMITTEE 



2219 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 




Secretary 



2220 



COMMITTEE 



Land 



Dormitories 
16 and 17 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

October 16, 1959, 12:01 p.m., University Commons, U of M, 

Amherst 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Haigis, Taber, 

Whitmore and Secretary Gillespie, 
Treasurer Johnson, Mr. Hug ill 

The University of Massachusetts has $150,000 with which 
to buy agricultural land for the College of Agriculture. Since 
1958 a faculty committee has been working on land needs and has 
been inspecting possible sites. The committee agreed that the land 
need not be contiguous to the main campus and has recommended the 
purchase of 600 acres a few miles south of the campus. The land 
has been appraised by Selwyn H. Graham, the appraiser appointed by 
the Trustees as required by the appropriation act. One owner is 
willing to sell at the appraised price but it appears that much of 
the land that is recommended for purchase will have to be taken by 
eminent domain. This is provided for in the appropriation. 

The Buildings and Grounds Committee toured the area to be 
purchased and members were very enthusiastic about it. The 
appraised price ($140, 450) being within the amount appropriated, the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee directed Treasurer Johnson to seek 
the necessary legal advice to prepare for the purchase and land 
taking. 

The Buildings and Grounds Committee made a thorough in- 
spection of the new Mary Lyon House. The committee decided not to 
accept Dormitories #16 and #17 until grave deficiencies listed 
with Treasurer Johnson are corrected. 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the Women's Athletic Field. 

After a thorough inspection of the Library addition and on 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Library addition, Massachusetts State 
Project U-803 - Granger Construction 
Company contractor - be accepted subject 
to correction of minor items contained in 
the list in the hands of the Treasurer 
within the contract period of one year as 
provided for in the contract. 

The Buildings and Grounds Committee made a detailed in- 
spection of Lincoln Apartments #5 and #11. It was recommended that 
they be not accepted until deficiencies' contained in the list in 
the hands of the Treasurer be corrected. 

The meeting adjourned at 5:45 p.m. 




Secretary 



2221 



Women ' s 
Athletic Field 



Goodell 
Library 
addition 



Lincoln 
Apartments 
5 and 11 



2222 


UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 


f 




FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 


r 


COMMITTEE 


January 5, I960, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Boyden, Crowley, Kiernan, 
Schuck, President Mather; also, 
Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 




New 


VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 




Courses 


they approve the new undergraduate courses, 
graduate courses and deletion of courses 
listed in Attachment A attached to these 
minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes. 

Upon recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 


i 


Ph.D. Degree 


VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 




Program in 


they approve a new Ph.D. degree program in 




Government 


Government as described in Attachment B 





Provost 



Programs of 
Non-Western 
Area Studies 



attached to these minutes and hereby made 
a part of these minutes. 

The President announced that it was possible that there 
might be a sudden vacancy in the office of Provost. On recommenda- 
tion of the President and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
in the case of a vacancy in the position of 
Provost, the President be authorized to 
appoint Dean Gilbert L. Woods ide as Acting 
Provost . 

The President announced that the University of Massachu- 
setts is participating in two new projects supported by private 
foundations: a Non- Western Area Studies in which the University 
cooperates with Mount Holyoke, Smith and Amherst colleges is 



t 



COMMITTEE 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

described in Attachment C attached to these minutes and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. The other program is an Intern- 
Graduate Training Program in Public Administration. Harvard Uni- 
versity, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston University 
and the University of Massachusetts are cooperating with the 
Commission on Administration and Finance in training people for 
state service. The University of Massachusetts is the fiscal agent 
for the $145,000 grant program. 

The presidents of the Four College Cooperation Program 
have agreed to support equally a budget of $32,000 for the joint 
four college astronomy department for the next two years, according 
to President Mather. At the end of two years, the situation is to 
be reviewed by the college presidents and a new budgetary division 
is to be made. 

The President announced that an AF of L - CIO teachers 
union local has been formed on the campus of the University of 
Massachusetts with an alleged 25 faculty membership. 

The President announced that the recruiting committee for 
a new Dean of the College of Agriculture is working diligently in 
an attempt to find suitable candidates for the job. Their task has 
been hampered somewhat by the salary for the position. 

There is a screening committee in the process of inter- 
viewing candidates for football coach. Because of the keen interest 
of newspaper reporters in this activity, the President stated that 
it would be impossible to keep the story from the press until the 
Trustees had an opportunity to vote on the appointment of a new 
coach . 



2223 



AF of L 
CIO 



2224 



COMMITTEE 



Football 
Coach 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the President be authorized to 
appoint as new football coach whoever 
is recommended by the screening 
committee and the appointment will be 
ratified by the Trustees at its next 
meet ing . 

The meeting adjourned at 11:55 a.m. 



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Secretary 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND 

GROUNDS 

February 16, 1960, 10:00 a.m., Campbell & Aldrich 
37 Newbury Street, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Whitmore; Secretary 
Gillespie, Treasurer Johnson; also 
Mr. Hugill, Construction and Maintenance 
Engineer, U of M; Mr. Larson, Consulting 
Architect, U of M; also Mr. Campbell 
and Mr.Kauffman of Campbell and Aldrich 

The model of the School of Business and the complex of 

buildings to be located at the south end of the campus was examined 

While the business before the committee was accepting the plan of 

the School of Business, it was recognized by accepting the plans 

for one building, this, in reality, set the location and general 

design of the others. After a lengthy discussion the committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
adoption of the general plans for the 
School of Business as set forth in the 
model constructed by Campbell and Aldrich 
and to authorize the purchase of the model 
for future reference. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson be authorized 
to enter a sewer payment contract (Attach- 
ment B.G.-A) for the state's share of the 
expansion of the sewer disposal plant on 
behalf of the Board of Trustees between the 
Board of Trustees, University of Massachu- 
setts, and the Selectmen of the Town of 
Amherst. 

The committee discussed a water supply study made by 

Whitman and Howard which designated four recommended sources of 

water for the University of Massachusetts. The committee accepted 

the report and recommended that it be filed in case the Town of 



2225 



School of 
Business 
Administrat ion 



Sewer 
System 



2226 



COMMITTEE 



Western 
Massachusetts 
Electric Co. 



Physics 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst in the future should not be able to furnish an adequate 

supply for the campus. The committee 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of a $192.00 payment to 
Western Massachusetts Electric Company 
for electric service to Mt. Lincolm 

The committee directed Treasurer Johnson to make further 
study pertaining to an agreement between the University of Massachu 
setts and the Western Massachusetts Broadcasting Council. 

After a study of the preliminary plans for the Physics 

Building, the committee 

VOTED : To ask the architect to restudy some 
phases of the plan. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:00 noon. 




sdJuL^, 



r Y x - K -' Secretary 



I 



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ATTACHMENTS -A 
Deceafcer 4, 1959 



AGREEMENT 



1 



The Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 

with 
The Selectmen of the Town of Amherst 
Acting as the Sewer Commissioners of the 
Town of Amherst, Massachusetts 

WHEREAS the Town of Amherst has been providing sewage disposal and 
treatment for the University of Massachusetts at charges established by the 
Town for all other users, and 

WHEREAS it now becomes necessary for the Town of Atdherst to expand its 
sewage treatment plant and facilities to meet the expanding needs of the 
University of Massachusetts and other growth of the town, and 

WHEREAS She Town of iteherst by action of its Town Meeting held on 
December 16 , 1959,, has authorised the expansion of the sewage treatment plant 
and has voted a bond issue to pay for said project, and 

WHEREAS the Treasurer of the University and the Construction and 
Maintenance Engineer of the University have reviewed the preliminary plans 
for the expansion of the sewage treatment plant as prepared by Haley and 
Ward* Engineers s dated November 3* 1£59, and found said plans to be satis- 
factory for the expanding needs of the University, and 

WHEREAS the General Court of Massachusetts has appropriated One Hundred 
Thousand Dollars ($100^000. 00) in Chapter 433 of the Acts of 1959 for a 
payment to the Town of An&erst on behalf of the University of Massachusetts 
as part of the cost of construction of an addition to the sewage treatment 
plant, and 

WHEREAS said Chapter 433 of the Acts of 1959 provided further as follows 
,! that the University shall first negotiate an agreement with said town for 
continuing service at the plant", and 

WHEREAS it is to the mutual interest of the University of Massachusetts 
and the Town of Amherst to continue this long- established arrangement of 
sewage disposal in the interest of economy and efficiency for both p-rties, 

HOW WITNESSETH that the Trustees of the University, hereinafter referred 
to as the University, and the Selectmen of the Town of Araherst acting as the 
Sewer Commissioners, hereinafter referred to as the Town, do hereby enter 
into the following covenants and agreements: 

1. The Town acting through its Sewer Commissioners shall instruct its 
engineers to complete the design for the expansion of the Sewage 
Treatment Plant, the Interceptor line, the outfall line and pump- 
ing station as authorized by vote of the Town. 






r 



r 



p. 



1 



D 



2. 

2. Upon completion of final plans, specifications and cost estimates . 
the Town shall submit this information to the Treasurer of the 
University for review and comment by himself and/or any members 

of the University staff or engineers designated by him. The Board 
of Sewer Commissioners agree to give full consideration to any 
recommendations made by the Treasurer concerning the design and 
specifications of the sewage improvements. The decision of the 
Sewer Commissioners shall be final in all cases. 

3. The Board of Sewer Commissioners acting for the Town of Amherst 
agree to provide sewerage treatment service to the University up 
to a maximum enrollment of 10,000 students. If the student en- 
rollment should increase beyond this maximum, sewerage service 
shall continue to be provided so long as additional capital con- 
struction is not required. If additional construction is required 
it shall be the subject of separate agreement. 

4. The Board of Sewer Commissioners hereby covenants and agrees to 
provide continuing sewage treatment for the University within the 
limits specified above at the same rate or charges that apply to 
all other large volume users of said facilities in the Town of 

Amherst. 

5. The University may acting through its Treasurer request the con- 
struction and installation of special facilities for instructional 
and research purposes at the Sewage Treatment Plant. Final design 
of these facilities shall be coordinated with the Town's engineers . 
All expenses and design and construction of such facilities shall be 
borne by the University and in all cases the decision of the Board 
of Sewer Commissioners shall be final. 

6. That, when the Board of Sewer Commissioners have signed a con- 
struction contract with a reliable contractor, suitably bonded, 
for the construction of additions and improvements to the Sewage 
Treatment Plant, the University will authorize the State Treasurer 
to make payment of One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000.00) to 
the Town of Amherst, as provided for in Item 1350-27 of Chapter 
433 of the Acts of 1959. 

Witness our hands and seals this _________ ^y °^ 

nineteen Hundred and . 

Witnesses: TRUSTEES OP THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

by. , 



Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer 



Witnesses: SELECTMEN OF THE TOWN OF AMHERST 



i 



Approved as to Form: 



Assistant Attorney General 



r 



I 



l 



I 



1 



PROGRAMS OF NON-WESTERN AREA STUDIES 
TO BE GIVEN BY THE FACULTIES OF AMHERST, 
MCCFr HOLYOKE, AND SMITH COLLEGES AND THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Our culture is the product in large measure of the evolution of Mediterranean- 
Western civilization in the past six thousand years, and this is the justification 
for the overwhelming emphasis commonly given in our educational programs to the 
study of the development of the West. But it has become clear in recent decades — 
and dramatically so since the end of World War II — that an excessive preoccupation 
vith the West has deprived us of (1) an adequate understanding of non-Western cul- 
tures, (2) the important insights into our own culture which can come from compara- 
tive study of other cultures, and (3) knowledge and understanding of areas and cul- 
tures central to our security. It is clear that America's educational institutions 
can no longer neglect this responsibility and that even colleges with relatively 
small faculties should make available to their students some knowledge of non- 
Western countries. Perhaps only those universities with really ample facilities 
and budgets will be able to devise well rounded programs in areas where there are 
major difficulties with language and library materials. But all institutions can 
make useful contributions to the dissemination of knowledge of non-Western cultures 
and developments, an activity which can be of great value both in contributing to 
the field of general education for the undergraduate and in stimulating the interest 
of a smaller number of students in professional specialization at the graduate 
level. 

To meet this need, it is proposed that the four institutions in the Connecticut 
Valley — Amherst, Mount Holyoke and Smith Colleges and the University of Massa- 
chusetts — undertake, on a co-operative basis, area programs of somewhat special 
and limited character, suited to their needs and reflecting the purposes described in 
the paragraph above. This would be a long range program, whose full dimensions migl- 4 
be realized only at the end of a ten-year period. It would envisage programs in 
Africa South of the Sahara, the Middle East (including North Africa), South Asia, 
and the Far East. Three of these areas have produced varied cultures with long 
and significant histories; the fourth, Africa, offers a rich field of study to the 
social scientist concerned with the interaction of advanced and primitive eultures 
and the problems of plural societies. All of these areas are presently of vital 
concern to the security of this country. 

There are sound reasons for concentrating on these rather than other areas. For 
at least two important areas — the Soviet Union and Latin America — present faci- 
lities in the Valley are relatively good, and it is felt that further strengthening 
could properly come from the efforts of the individual colleges. In each of the 
four areas in question, there is already some basic strength in the Valley; and in 
the case of the Far Bast, there is already sufficient strength to carry out the 
minimum purposes envisaged in this program. 

The institutions in the Valley have a further very important advantage in the re- 
cent creation of administrative machinery for co-operation among them. Indeed the 
whole concept of these area programs is grounded in this co-operative plan. These 
programs would be both planned and executed by the instructional staff of the four 
institutions, and would be administered by a joint committee. These area programs 
would not lead to a major but would emphasize basic courses of a general education 
nature, with some advanced work* including seminars and individual directed reading. 



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The approach would be interdisciplinary, in bo far as staffing permits. Teaching 
would be the responsibility largely of the resident faculties of the four institu- 
tions* However, both faculty and students would move about the Valley in accord 
with the most effective use of time and energy. The programs would also need the 
participation of visiting professors and ad hoc lecturers. 

It is clear that the initiation and carrying out of an enterprise of this com- 
plexity will require time, thoughtful planning, and careful phasing, as well as 
patience and goodwill on the part of all those concerned. Since the Far Eastern 
field is already adequately staffed for basic purposes, the chief need is to mo- 
bilise these facilities in terms of the plan here developed. The committee proposes 
that our major emphasis, therefore should be placed on South Asia, the Middle East 
and Africa south of the Sahara, 

CO-OPERATIVE ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS 

The four colleges in the Connecticut Valley — Amherst College, Mount Holyoke 
College, Smith College, and the University of Massachusetts — have already devel- 
oped the administrative machinery for cooperative activity and gained considerable 
experience in operating it. There is an overall coordinating committee composed of 
the Presidents of the Valley colleges and a four-college coordinator. Professor 
Sidney Packard. Arrangements are in existence whereby members of one faculty may 
teach at one or more of the other Valley colleges as part of their regular teaching 
program, provision being made for travel expenses. Students at any one of the 
four colleges may take classes for credit at any other college offering courses not 
available at the home institution. There is no additional charge for such instruc- 
tion and the home institution provides free transportation to the class, A com- 
mittee of four members, one from each college, is investigating, under a grant from 
the Fund For The Advancement of Education, the possibility of founding a model 
college in nearby Hadley administered by the four institutions and aimed at provid- 
ing the best possible instruction with the minimum number of faculty. Most signi- 
ficant as an example of working cooperation is the Hampshire Inter-Library Center, 
which has been in existence a number of years. This is a corporation operated by the 
librarians of the four Valley colleges under the overall direction of the coordinat- 
ing committee of the Presidents. It provides a center for research materials and 
periodicals not needed continuously by any one institution but available for use at 
any one of the four colleges at forty-eight hours notice. 

The program of non-Western studies will be administered, under the overall 
direction of the committee of the four Presidents and in co-operation with the 
coordinator, by a committee of four. This committee will be composed of one teach- 
ing member for each institution, who should act in the interests of the Valley col- 
leges as a whole and not as a representative of the particular interests of his or 
her college. One of these four will serve as director of the program with releas- 
ed time adequate to his duties. He will be responsible for implementing the de- 
cisions of the committee, and in particular for working with the departments of the 
four colleges in which area courses are offered, to facilitate the introduction 
both of new courses within existing departmental programs, and of relevant material 
into other courses. He will also be expected to maintain contact with other insti- 
tutions which have organized programs in these areas to obtain their advice and 




I 



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help both in planning and securing library and teaching resources. It is hoped that 
the appointment of faculty personnel with special competence in one of the chosen 
areas by any of the four colleges will be made only after consultation with the 
committee and in accordance with the overall plan for area studies which will be 
drawn up by the committee and implemented step by step during the next years. 

The Advantages of the Four- Institution Cooperative Approach: - 

The advantages of the four- institution cooperation have already been suggested. 
In the area studies proposed, the four institutions can accomplish together what 
none of them can achieve individually. 

1. Pooling of faculty and library resources. 

2. Enriching the undergraduate curriculum in all four institutions, 

3. Providing a broader base for long range planning and operation of such a 
program. 

k. Attracting specialized professional personnel both to our own faculties and 
as visiting lecturers, 

THE COURSE PROGRAM TO BE DEVELOPED IN EACH OF THS FOUR AREAS 

There is no intention of establishing an undergraduate major in area studies; 
the objective is to have available in the Valley courses at three different levels 
which could be taken by students as part of their regular major program or as sup- 
plementary courses to broaden their education. The existence of the courses pro- 
posed below would permit a student to take either a limited amount of work in the 
areas of his or her choice or else a co-ordinated program in a single area. 

1. A one-semester introductory course in each area. Such courses would be ad- 
apted to the curriculum of each institution. Smith College and the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, for example, have adopted the interdepartmental 
social science approach. Such a course would be suggestive rather than ex 
haustive. At the same time, an effort would be made to explore fairly 
thoroughly a limited number of outstanding topics. 

2. a series of junior-senior courses related to particular aspects of these 
areas, e, g. history, religion, philosophy, literature, art, anthropology, 
government, economics, sociology. 

3. Senior seminars, either interdepartmental or departmental, possibly with 
alternation between subjects and emphasis. 

The courses in (1) above would ordinarily be given in each individual college. 
The same person might teach the introductory course in more than one college. It 
is anticipated that most of the junior-senior courses in (2) and seminars in (3) 
would be offered only in one college and that students from the other colleges who 
elect that subject would be transported to that class. 



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SOME FURTHER COMMENTS ON THE SELECTION OF THESE 

FOUR AREAS 

Africa South of the Sahara, South Asia (India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Philippines, 
and adjacent areas), the Middle East, and the Far East are appropriate areas for 
study for a variety of reasons including the following: 

1. The liberal arts curriculum should take non-Western societies, ideas, and 
development into account because of their inherent interest and value. 

2. The study of non-Western societies provides a broader perspective on our own 
society. 

3. Each of these areas is extremely significant today in the world picture. All 
are undergoing rapid social change whose direction is not yet settled. All 
are important theatres of competition in the struggle between the Communist 
and the Western nations. South and Southeast Asia include the largest 
number of "uncommitted peoples in the world. Africa is no less significant 
with the rapid transition of so many of its peoples to independence, and 

the tensions of its plural societies affecting race relations throughout the 
world. The Middle East has great significance to the West because of its 
strategic location, its oil and other natural resources. The Far East is 
already divided between the Communist and Western spheres and developments in 
both areas are keenly watched by the uncommitted peoples. American college 
students possess very limited knowledge of these areas, and courses in these 
fields would help to equip undergraduates for responsible citizenship. 

k. The materials for studying South Asia and Africa are predominantly in English 
and French, so that undergraduate students will be able to use primary source 
material in research papers. This is less true of the Middle East and the 
Far East, but in each instance enough has been written in these two languages 
to permit the exploration of some of the major problems, 

5. There are an increasing number of professional opportunities available to 
people who have taken concentrated work in one of these areas. These op- 
portunities include positions in the Department of State and other federal 
agencies, in foreign trade departments of business concerns, and in research 
and university teaching. There are a number of graduate institutions for 
the specialized study of these areas and it can be expected that some of 
those who have taken undergraduate courses in this program would go on to 
prepare themselves for more advanced work. Some students who have taken 
minimal work in these areas have already gone on to more specialized train- 
ing and are holding positions of responsibility. 

6. There are at present a number of faculty members at the four institutions 
who are professionally interested in one or more of these areas, and who arc 
doing research and have published in these fields. Details concerning their 
teaching, field research, and publications in these fields are appended. 
Other faculty members offer courses which deal in part with these areas. 

e. g, economics of underdeveloped areas, comparative religions, international 
relations, expansion of Western culture, Commonwealth of Nations, comparative 
government, modern imperialism, etc. 












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BUDGET 

The following budget is drawn up on the expectation that the course part of this 
program will not be introduced before the fall of I960. Much needs to be done be- 
fore that time, however, to build up library resources, canvas possibilities and make 
arrangements for the visiting professor and visiting lecturers, and consult with 
departments and colleges about new courses. 



Planning & 

Preparation First Second Third Total 



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library- 
Visiting Professor 
(one each year 
for three years) 

Released Faculty 
Time 

Visiting Lecturers 

Miscellaneous 
(Travel, secretarial, 
etc.) 

Summer Field Study 
(2 people) 



13,000 13,000 10,000 10,000 46,000 



14,000 14,000 14,000 42,000 
(Salary and Travel) 



4,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 49,000 

2,000 7,000 7,000 6,000 22,000 

2,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 11,000 

7,000 7,000 7,000 21,000 



TOTAL : $21,000 $59,000 $56,000 $55,000 $191,000 



Library ; The basic need is to increase library resources throughout the Vallty 
and in HILC. There is much standard and current material in each field which each 
college should possess and some significant out-of-print material, back issues of 
periodicals and specialized materials which HILC could secure. These funds would 
provide $2500 for each of the four colleges in the introductory and first years 
which would be used for basic materials in the three fields which require most sup- 
port and $2000 each in the two succeeding years to help round out the collections 
in all four areas. $3000 would be allocated to HILC the introductory and first year: 
and $2000 the two successive years. 

Visiting Professor ; These funds would make it possible to bring to the Valley 
one visiting professor a year so that in the course of three years and colleges of 
the Valley would have had the benefit of the knowledge and experience of one out- 
standing individual in each of the three fields which need most support. It is 
anticipated that the visiting professor would give a seminar open to students 
throughout the Valley but that his teaching otherwise would be confined to giving 
occasional general lectures and lectures in courses in the four colleges and an in- 
formal faculty seminar to strengthen Valley resources in his area. 



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Released Faculty Time ; The funds allocated for released time for faculty 
members would be used for reimbursing institutions for faculty time devoted to 
directing this program and to planning and giving courses within it. It would not 
be unreasonable to assume that the equivalent of three full professors and three 
assistant professors might give a total of six one semester courses in this program 
in any one year at all the institutions. Such courses would include basic, advanced, 
and senior courses, and these would be in addition to those which they had habitually 
given or would represent a portion of the time of faculty members newly appointed. 

Visiting Lecturers ; These, like the visiting professor, will be shared among 
the four colleges in accordance with plans agreed to by the committee. Particular 
efforts will be made to bring persons from the area who are in this country. This 
item includes funds for transportation from Bradley Field for those coming from a 
distance and also for transportation while in the Valley. The colleges will provide 
the usual hospitality for visiting lecturers. 

Miscellaneous ; The need for secretarial assistance, allowance for telephone 
and postage, travel funds and a small entertainment allowance is obvious. 

Summer Field Study : The allocation for summer field study would permit two per- 
sons each year to get up to date experience in the area in which he or she will give 
course work. Each grant would commonly go to a person who has already had first 
hand experience in research in the area and who is returning for the purpose of re- 
freshing his knowledge. While grants for a whole year of study abroad are financed 
by various foundations, there are no such grants available for summer study. 
Through such grants regular faculty members could refresh or enrich their equipment 
and be able to make an immediate contribution to the program. 

If there is no four-college trust account to which the funds could be trans- 
ferred, it is suggested that they be handled by the institution from which the 
director is selected. 



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A LIST OF FACULTY WITH TEACHING. FIELD STUDY. RESEARCH EXPERIENCE. AND PUBLICATIONS 

IN THE FOUR SELECTED AREaS 

Africa 

Gwendolen M, Carter , Professor of Government, Smith College. 
Teaching: 

Africa South of the Sahara, an interdepartmental course, given each year 

at Smith College since 195^; enrollment, 25-160 students. 
Commonwealth of Nations, covers Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South 

Africa, India, Pakistan, Ceylon, and Ghana. 
Africa South of the Sahara, an Interdepartmental course, organized and 

given in spring, 1959, at the University of Massachusetts {enrollment 

6>7 students. 
Field Study and Research; 

Thirteen months in South Africa, 1952-53 » and two other shorter study trips 

to South Africa at other times. 
Commonwealth study tour, 1948JJ-9; visited South Africa, Kenya, Rhodesia, 

India, Pakistan, Ceylon, Australia, New Zealand. 
African study tour, four months, 1958, Nigeria, Liberia, Ghana, French 

West Africa, and Belgian Congo. 
Publications : 

The Politics of Inequality; South Africa Since 19**8 , Praeger, 1958. 
Transition in Africa; Studies in Political Adaptation , ed. with 

W. 0. Brown, Boston University Press, 195&. 
"The Commonwealth in Africa," Behind the Headlines pamphlet, Canadian 

Institute of International Affairs, March, 1958. 
"South Africa," Foreign Policy Association Headline Book, January, 1955. 
Numerous articles on South Africa, e. g. The Annals , 1955 and 195". 

Foreign Policy Bulletin , etc. 
"The Gold Coast, A Future Dominion?", International Journal , 195^, and 

other articles on Ghana in Foreign Policy Bulletin , etc. 
"Trouble in French West Africa, n The World Today , London, December, 1958, 
The British Commonwealth and International Security , Canadian Institute of 

International Affairs, 19^7. 
Numerous pamphlets and articles on the Commonwealth, including several on 

the Asian Dominions. 
President, Africa Studies Association, 1958-59. 

Alfred Harris . Instructor in Sociology and Anthropology, Smith College. 
Teaching; 

Culture Contact and Change; cases selected from Latin America, Africa, 

Middle East, Asia, and Pacific. 
Social Anthropology. 
Field Study and Research: 

Three years studying the Taita tribe in Kenya (assisted by his wife, Grace 
Harris, an anthropologist. Prepared a study on the Taita tribe for 
George Kimball's Survey of Africa, Twentieth Century Fund, 
Publications 1 

A study of the Taita tribe to be published by the African Studies and 
Research Program, Boston University. 



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- 8- 

John Lobb , Professor of Economics and Sociology, Mount Holyoke College, 
Teaching: 

Cultural Anthropology, uses African materials, but covers other areas 
throughout the world. 
Field Study and Research: 

"Cultural Development and Change in South Africa from 1652-1835% doctoral 
dissertation at Yale University, 

Far East 

Dorothy Bacon , Professor of Economics, Smith College, 
Teaching: 

Comparative Economics: Underdeveloped Areas, 
Field Study and Research: 

A year as Fulbright Professor at the University of the Philippines, com- 
bined with field work on rural credit organization, 1957-58. 
Preparing the results of this field investigation as a book which will be 
completed within a year and a half, 

Maribeth E. Cameron , Dean, and Professor of History, Mount Holyoke College, 
Teaching : 

The History and Civilization of Eastern Asia (six semester hours, one 

year)} average enrollment, about 25 students. 
Taught Far Eastern History at Reed College, Stanford University, Claremont 
Graduate School, Milwaukee-Downer College, Western Reserve University, 
Field Study and Research: 

Language study and research in China, 1936-37* 
Publications : 

The Reform Movement in China. 1898-1912 . Stanford University Press, 1932. 
China. Japan and the Powers , with Thomas H, D, Mahoney and George E, 

McReynolds, 1952, 
•'Chang Chih-tung", in Eminent Chinese of the Ch'ing Period , Washington, 

19^3. 
The United States and Eastern Asia. A Study Guide , Washington, 1950. 
China, Japan and the United States. A Study Guide , Washington, 1956. 
Thirty-one articles on Chinese history in prof essional and general 

periodicals . 
China. Japan and the Powers , being revised, scheduled for publication 

publication early in I960. 
General history of China, scheduled for publication in 1962. 
Member of Editorial Board and Book Review Editor, The Far Eastern Quarterly 
(now The Journal for Asian Studies ). 19^-51 • 

Albert M. Craig . Instructor in History, University of Massachusetts. 
Teaching: 

History of the Far East, two semester course. 
Study and Research: 

Two years residence in Japan engaged in research* 

Eleanor Hadley . Associate Professor of Economics, Smith College. 
Teaching: 

Director, interdepartmental seminar on Continuity and Change in Modern 
Japan, 1959* 
Field Study and Researcht 

Extensive experience in Japan since first visit as a student in 1936* 



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Eleanor Hadley : ( continued. .,.,..) 

Special student at Tokyo University, working particularly on the language, 

1938-40. 
Travel also to Shanghai, Korea, Manchukuo, Inner China, and Inner Mongolia, 

1939-40, 
Economist on General McArthur's staff for occupation, following period as 
officer in the Department of State, 1946-47. 
Publications j 

Two articles on Japan, Harvard Business Review . July, 1948, and Far 
Eastern Survey . December, 1949. 
J. Henry Korson . Professor of Sociology, University of Massachusetts, 
Field Study and Research: 

Visiting Professor of Sociology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan; Asia 
Foundation Research Fellow, 1957-58. 
Shannon McCune . Provost, University of Massachusetts. 
Teaching: 

Developed and taught a course on India and South East Asia, Colgate 
University, 1947-55; taught a course on the Far East at Colgate 
University, 1947-55. 
Taught courses on the far east during summer or term at Miami, Harvard, 
Chicago, Washington, Minnesota, Columbia, McGill, Johns Hopkins. 
Field Study and Research: 

Fulbright Visiting Professor, Institute of Geography, University of Tokyo, 

1953-5^. 

Economic Analyst-Chief Economic Intelligence Officer, Board of Economic 
Warfare and Foreign Economic Administration, 1942-45 ; served in 
Washington, London, New Delhi, Kandy (Ceylon), Chungking. 

Deputy Director, Far East Program Division, Economic Cooperation Adminis- 
tration, June, 1950-February, 1951, 

Acting Chief of Special Technical and Economic Mission, ECA, Indonesia, 

February- August, 1951. 

Publications : 

Korea's Heritage. A Regional and Social Geography . Tokyo, Charles E. Tuttle 
Co<( 1956 ; 

Some ninety articles on the Far East and India and South Asia in geographic, 
educational, and international affairs Journals. 
Willard L. Thorp . Professor of Economics, Amherst College 
Teachings 

Deals with the problems of underdeveloped countries in Africa and Asia in 
courses in economics. 
Field Study and Research: 

Has had substantial experience both when Assistant Secretary of State and 
at other times with Japan, China, India and the petroleum problem in 
the Middle East. 
Thomas 0. Wilkinson . Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Massachusetts. 
~ Field Study and Research: 

Research Sociologist, International Urban Research, University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley (Analysis of metropolitan growth in Japan, Korea, 
Formosa, China), 1957-58. 
Current research supported by a grant from Population Council of America, an 
analysis of demography of Japanese cities based upon data from 
currently published volumes of the 1955 Japanese census. 
Charles W, MacSherry . Associate Professor of History, Smith College. 

Introduction to Far Eastern Civilizations - two one-semester courses from the 

beginning to the present. 
Oriental Art: two one-semester courses, one on the art of China and the other 
art of Japan. 



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"— " n > «"**—" (continued ) " 10 ' 

publications: , „ .. „ -__, q n ~ioioev 19 # No. 1. March, 195** • 

ssasssE"' est uWBS*fe«a.. 

Middle East 

.twhn A. Petronulos , Instructor in History. Amherst College. 

T6aCh Ha1 ! a special teaching interest in Byzantium, the Ottoman Empire, and the 
modern Balkans, especially Greece. 
,T.hn L. Teall, Assistant Professor of History, Mount Holyoke College 

Teaching: ^master course which has been given 

The History of the Near East, a °ne-semest er cc u 

for the past three years. ^ nro ^ ra ^' ^re in the Byzantine 
Training, research interests and publications are in x-ne y 

TeaCl t^t Religion,, Religions of India. China, and Japan, and Judaic 

Christianity, and Islam. 
Field Study and Research: p ^ t dur in g sabbatical 

Traveled extensively in India and parts of the tar cas 

leave, 1957-58. 
gaanj^iyer, distant Professor of Sociology. University of Massachusetts. 
IeMh lX and South and Southeast Asia^ ^nterdep^en^seoial science 
course, organized and given in the fall, A^o. 
Also "bourse at the University of Pennsylvania on South Asia, 

1953-5**. 
Field Study and Research: universities, 1957-58; field research 

Fulbright Lecturer at several Indian universities, x?j, j~ 
in India on sociological subjects. 

w^t P. Hawkins . Professor of Sconces and Sooiology. Mount HolyoRe College. 
***%!*, oourse on Problems of *»%^J^EStfJ?£5&' 

these countries. 
Field Study and Research: 

Taught two years at Oberlin College in China. ^^ 

Daring World War II spent considerable time in on xna , ^ Coopera tion 
Chief! Indonesia Branch, Asia Development Service. Technical ooope 
I Administration, 1952-53. _ 

Traveled and studied in Indonesia, summer, iy$,\ 



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-13V - 

Everett D. Hawkins : (continued.,.....) 

Teaching economics at Gadjah Mada University, Jogjakarta, Indonesia, 
under a University of Wisconsin-Ford Foundation Contract, 1958-59. 

Publications : 

Numerous articles on economic problems in Indonesia, 

Burr Overs treet . Associate Professor of Government, Smith College, 
Teaching: 

Contemporary India and Its Role in Asia, an interdepartmental social 

science course, given every other year. Enrollment 50 to 60 students. 
Field Study and Research 

Traveled in India, summer, 195&J earlier extensive travel in South-east 
Asia. 



* * * * 

During the past two years the Departments of Political Science and Economics and 
Sociology at Mount Holyoke College have offered a joint senior seminar dealing 

with a geographical area, depending on visiting lecturers. 
Spring, 1958 - Economic and Social Problems in Contemporary Africa, Enrollment 

- 28 students including two from Amherst and one from the University of 

Massachusetts. 
Spring, 1959 - Change and Conflict in the Middle East. 

Enrollment - 25 students including three from Amherst and two from the 

University of Massachusetts. 

* * * * 

Total enrollments at the four Valley Colleges (spring semester, 1959). 

Amherst College 1,010 

Mount Holyoke College It 395 

Smith College 2,305 

University of Massachusetts 5tl00 (estimated) 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

February 16, 1960, 1:30 p.m., Parker House, Boston 

Chairman Brett presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Brett, McDermott, Secretary 
Gillespie, Treasurer Johnson 

The committee reviewed the gift program of Murray D. 

Lincoln and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it confirm the action of the President in 
accepting on December 31, 1959 a gift of an 
additional 16 acres of land in Blendon 
Township, Franklin County, Ohio (near 
Columbus) , adjacent to the land already held 
by the Trustees from Murray D. and Anne H. 
Lincoln and to authorize that this land be 
placed in the Murray D. Lincoln Endowment 
Fund at $33,600 (1957 appraised value of 
$2100 per acre). 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson be authorized 
to sign an amendment to the lease with 
Murray D. Lincoln to include the additional 
16 acres of land under the same terms and 
conditions as the existing lease. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it accept the gift of $753.00 from the New 
England Feedmen Association for the establish- 
ment of a student loan fund. Establish the 
terms of the New England Feedmen Association 
Student Loan Fund in accordance with the 
attached statement (Attachment F-A) 

It was 

VOTED : To place the securities received from the 

Emily M. Staples Estate on the books of the 
University for the Dr. Henry Franklin Staples 
Memorial Fund at the market value as of the 
date of transfer of $26,944.73 as per 
attached list. (Attachment F-B) 



2227 



Lincoln, 
Murray D. 
Anne H. 



and 



New England 
Feedmen 
Association 
Student 
Loan Fund 



Staples, 
Henry Franklin 
Memorial Fund 



2228 



COMMITTEE 



Stock 



Auditor's 
Report 



University 
Fund 



Hampshire 
Inter-Library 
Center, Inc. 



Research 
Corporation 

Patents on 
invent ions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To confirm exchange of 100 shares of 
American Surety Co. for 66 shares 
Transamerica Corp. common stock. 

The committee reviewed the State Auditor's report for the 
period July 1, 1958 to June 30, 1959. It was the consensus that 
the audit report was generally fair and points of criticism and 
answers in a report by the Treasurer were studied. The committee 
did not recommend any action on the part of the Board of Trustees. 

The committee discussed expenditures of the University 

Fund for special projects and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 
authorize the President to spend for the 
furtherance of the University program 
such additional funds to those authorized 
on August 4, 1959 from the University 
Fund not to exceed $2,500 as in his 
discretion are necessary through June 30, 
1960. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 

authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 
to enter into an agreement between the 
University of Massachusetts and the Hampshire 
Inter-Library Center, Inc. for educational 
services at a sum of $4,000 payable from 
subsidiary account 03 for the period July 1, 
1959 to June 30, 1960 with provision for 
extension from year to year. 

The absence of a patent policy for the University was 

discussed and the committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 

authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to enter into a contract with Research 
Corporation, a non-profit foundation, 
405 Lexington Avenue, New York 14, New York 
for the administration of patents on in- 
ventions offered to them by the University 
and its faculty. It provides that the in- 
ventor shall receive 15% of gross income, 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and that the University and Research 
Corporation will share equally in any 
net income after Research Corporation's 
costs are met. It provides further that 
Research Corporation will meet all costs 
of patents that it administers so that 
there will be no expense to either the 
inventor or the University. A form of 
the agreement is on file in the Treasurer's 
Office. 

The National Defense Student Loan Fund as it applies to 
the University was discussed. Under the program the University 
must match the federal grant by one-ninth. The committee directed 
the Treasurer to explore sources of funds which could be used for 
the University's matching share. 

The committee reviewed the security holdings and post- 
poned action on any changes. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:10 p.m. 




Secretary 



2229 



National 
Defense 
Student 
Loan Fund 



2230 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



ATTACHMENT p-/h 
February 11, 1960 



THE NEW ENGLAND F3EDMER 
ASSXIATXON LOAN FUND 

That the gift of $?53<,16 i> and any future donations, of 
tha New England Feadiaen Association be accepted and that a trust 
fund be established entitled, rs The New England Feed ..on Association 
Loan Fund"* In accordance with the terms of the gift, loans are 
to be made out of this fund to undergraduate and graduate students 
at the University majoring either in the area of poultry, dairy, or 
animal science* No interest is to be charged if the student repays 
his loan by the maturity date» Any unpaid balance after maturity 
is to bear interest at the rate of 4% per annum. Except for the 
conditions spelled out above, this loan fund is to be administered 
in accordance with the procedures and policies established by the 
faculty committee on student loans » 



f 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
March 8, 1960, 10:00 a.m., 156 Stuart Street, Boston, Mass. 

Dr. Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Cashin, 
Crowley, Healey, Whitmore; also, 
Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson 

All members of the Executive Committee signed a waiver of 
meeting notice. Dr. Boyden described the status of the recruiting 
process for a new president. The committee members discussed the 
background of many of the candidates. 

The members discussed the by-laws of the Board of 

Trustees of the University of Massachusetts as they apply to a 

vacancy in the position of President - specifically the following 

paragraph : 

"In the event of a vacancy in the office of the Presi- 
dent of the University, or during his absence or in- 
ability to attend to the duties of that office, the 
Provost of the University or some other officer who 
may be designated by the President, shall perform the 
duties of the President until some other person is 
appointed President pro tern, by the Board of Trustees, 
or until the office is regularly filled." 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

Jean Paul Mather be authorized the use of the 
President's House on the campus of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts at Amherst until 
June 30, 1960 with the proviso that he pay 
$100 a month rent. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:40 a.m. 




Secretary 



223 L 



President 



£>&*j£i 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of 
the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts held Tuesday, March 8, 1960 
at 10:00 a.m. at 156 Stuart Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 




Date 



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I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of 
the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts held Tuesday, March 8, 1960 
at 10:00 a.m. at 156 Stuart Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 




Signature 



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I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of 
the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts held Tuesday, March 8, 1960 
at 10:00 a.m. at 156 Stuart Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 



Signature 



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I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of 

the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the 

University of Massachusetts held Tuesday, March 8, 1960 

at 10:00 a.m. at 156 Stuart Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
tfc 10:00 a, fi«t, loatoa. MMmAm* 



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I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of 
the executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts held Tuesday, March 3, 1960 
at 10:00 a.m. at 156 Stuart Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 




jl<L (P. aLaM ., 

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I hereby agree to waive 7 days* notice of the meeting of 
the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts held Tuesday, March 8, 1960 
at 10:00 a.m. at 156 Stuart Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 




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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
March 17, 1960, 11:00 a.m., Student Union, Amherst 
Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Haigis, S chuck, Whitmore, 
Also, Secretary Gillespie and 
Treasurer Johnson. Also Messrs. 
Hugill, Larson, Campbell and Maloney 

The Committee reviewed the progress of buildings under 
design and construction. Treasurer Johnson indicated if the 
buildings in the Governor's capital outlay program for this year 
are completed the campus will be able to accommodate an academic 
program for 10,000 students. 

The Committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the preliminary design of the Fourth Section 
of the Science Center be approved with some 
modifications as suggested by the Committee 
and to be approved by the Committee at a 
later meeting. 

The Committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the preliminary design of the School of 
Business Administration including the site 
plan of the complex of buildings as shown 
in the model on display at the Student 
Union be approved. 

The Committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the preliminary design of the Engineering 
Buildings be approved. 

The Committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 3 of Chapter 456 of the Acts of 1958, 
the rental rate of $27.75 per month be 
established for the Head of Residence suite 
in Hills House South and Hills House North. 



2233 



Science 
Center - 
Fourth 
Section 



School of 
Business 
Adminis tration 



Engineering 
Building 



Head of 
Residence 
Hills House 



2234 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMITTEE 

Science 
Center - 
Second 
Section 

Dickinson 
Hall 



Architectural 
Consultant 



Catholic 
Chapel 



After an inspection tour by the Committee, it was 
VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

a. Science Center-Second Section-Mass. 
State Project U-57-1, Columbia Con- 
struction Co. as of February 17, 1960 
be accepted. 

b. R.O.T.C. Building-Mass. State 
Project U-57-2 Wiley and Foss Co. 
as of February 3, 1960 be accepted. 

The Committee discussed the problems involved in planning 

and executing a building development program for the campus. In 

order to insure that the Trustees are moving in the proper manner, 

it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

one, two or three distinguished architectural 
consultants be appointed by the Board of 
Trustees to reassess and/or redevelop the 
architectural philosophy of the University 
of Massachusetts campus and to review the 
master plan and to request the Commission 
on Administration and Finance make funds 
available to pay such consultants. 

The Diocese of Springfield has purchased a house and lot 
of land abutting the University campus for a Catholic student 
chapel. The house will be demolished and a chapel will be con- 
structed. The architect, after a preliminary survey, feels the lot 
is a little small for the project. The Catholic chaplain inquired 
if the Board of Trustees under their authority of Sections 25 and 
27 of Chapter 75 of the General Laws would consider selling a small 
parcel of land so that the chapel would have an adequate setting. 

At the direction of the Chairman, the Secretary was 
directed to inquire of the Attorney General if the Trustees had the 
authority to sell land to such an organization and to ascertain 
how much land would be involved. 



COMMITTEE 



a 



j 



2235 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Centennial Year of the University of Massachusetts 
will be celebrated starting in June 1962. The Centennial 
Committee has requested that Butterf ield dormitory be assigned as 
a continuing education center for year around educational con- 
ferences and that the University of Massachusetts Building 
Association be requested to make available for centennial con- 
ferences an additional dormitory during the Centennial Year. 

The meeting adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 



Centennial 




Secretary 



2236 



COMMITTEE 



Athletic 

Policy 

Statement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS 
March 25, 1960, 3:00 p.m., Hampton Court Hotel, Brookline, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees Crowley, Pumphret, 
Secretary Gillespie, Dean 
McGuirk, Athletic Council 
Members Winn, Tunis, Marcus, 
Alumni Secretary Johnston 

In the absence of the Chairman, Trustee Crowley presided. 

This was the first meeting of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Trustee Committee on Athletics so as a frame of reference 
for the committee, the policy statement of the Board of Trustees 
adopted February 14, 1957 was reaffirmed. 

STATEMENT ON ATHLETIC POLICY FOR 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WHEREAS, since its founding in 1863, the University of 
Massachusetts has recognized the necessity of providing more than 
technical and classical instruction for young men and women in 
preparation for adult life and 

WHEREAS, a sound physical education program is recognized 
as an essential need for the development of a healthy personality, 
able to absorb and use wisely the intellectual offerings of a Uni- 
versity and 

WHEREAS, the physical education program has not kept pace 
with the progress of the University in other areas 

BE IT RESOLVED that the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts endorse the following policy and direct the ad- 
ministration and faculty to take the necessary steps for its imple- 
mentation: 

1. The required physical education program for both 
men and women students in the freshman and 
sophomore years shall continue to be an essential 
part of the University's requirement for the under- 
graduate degree. 

2. The intramural athletic program shall be staffed 
and equipped to meet the needs of all students 
who desire to participate, and the University 
shall encourage participation through a varied 
program including sports with "carry-over" value 
for life after graduation. 



I 



I 



I 



i 



COMMITTEE 



2237 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3. Professional courses in physical education shall 
be offered for those students desiring to major 
or minor in physical education as a prelude to 
careers as coaches or teacher-coaches. 

4. Consistent with present policies on admissions 
and academic standards, the intercollegiate 
athletic program shall be developed to a point 
where it is representative of the best efforts of 
the University, with aims and ideals of achieve- 
ment comparable to those expected of the academic 
departments. This development shall proceed in 
accord with policies and regulations of the 
National College Athletic Association, the Eastern 
College Athletic Conference and the Yankee Con- 
ference, in each of which the University maintains 
membership. 

Dean McGuirk reported on the athletic program. He said 
that there are now 16 formalized varsity sports and 13 freshman 
sports programs which form a part of the comprehensive program in 
physical education and athletics. He also stated that progress has 
been made through a streamlined Athletic Council, which is assuming 
increased responsibility. Improvement in the professional coaching 
staff was also noted. The scholarship and grant-in-aid program has 
been enhanced by the University of Massachusetts Building Corpora- 
tion's purchase of washing and drying machines as a part of the new 
dormitory equipment. Increase in scholarship aid monies, indoor 
facilities, and replacement of and additional outdoor physical 
education and athletic areas are the greatest needs at the present 
time. 

The following joint motion of the Athletic Council and the 

Athletic Committee of the Board of Trustees was adopted: 

The current policy of scholarship and grant- 
in-aid be reaffirmed. 

The Athletic Committee of the Board of Trustees agreed to 

meet with the Athletic Council twice a year. Suggested times for 

meetings are the late fall and late spring. 



2238 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A problem requiring immediate consideration is the 

athletic facilities on the campus. As a joint recommendation of 

the Athletic Committee of the Board of Trustees and the Athletic 

Council, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee that the present capital outlay 
money identified with the Men's Physical 
Education Building be supplemented by 
$250,000 to prepare site developments for 
necessary areas for physical athletic pro- 
grams. 

The financial situation pertaining to the scholarship 
program was discussed. The fixed sources of income are: the vend- 
ing and concession revenue and the unrestricted endowment grant of 
$4,500. Game guarantees and gate receipts are difficult to 
anticipate. The need for more fixed sources was considered. 

It was a joint recommendation of the Athletic Council 

and the Committee on Athletics of the Board of Trustees to: 

Ask the Finance Committee of the Board of 
Trustees to inquire into the possibility 
of increased unrestricted endowments to be 
increased to $10,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:00 p.m. 



I 



I 




Secretary 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



2239 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 
April 26, 1960, 11:00 a.m., President's Office, U of M 

PRESENT : Trustees Brown, Crowley, McNamara, 
Provost McCune, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Gillespie, and by invita- 
tion of the committee, Messrs. 
Jeffrey, Davis and Allan of the 
College of Agriculture. 

Associate Director of Extension Lloyd H. Davis 

discussed his plan for strengthening Agricultural Extension work, 

as approved by the newly formed Extension Advisory Council. Upon 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve -- 

1. The statement of objectives, policies, and 
procedures for strengthening Agricultural 
Extension as prepared by the Director of 
Extension and set forth in the April 1, 1960 
minutes of the Extension Advisory Council 
meeting, subject to approval of the change 
as indicated on the attached memorandum from 
Dr. Lloyd H. Davis to Dr. John Gillespie. 

2. The participation of appropriate University 
personnel in the preparation of the proposed 
legislation affecting county-state organiza- 
tion for conducting Extension work. Such 
proposed legislation to be submitted to the 
Board of Trustees for approval. 

3. Extending the present University policies on 
"Work for Academic Credit" and "Remission of 
Tuition" as set forth in the current Standard 
Practice Instructions to County Extension 
personnel. 

4. The development of a policy providing for the 
sale of certain bulletins and services of the 
College of Agriculture and School of Home 
Economics. Such a policy to be submitted to 
the Board of Trustees for approval. 

5. The creation of regional specialist positions 
as county Extension vacancies occur and funds 
are available. 



2240 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting adjourned at 12:00 noon. 




JoM Gillespie 
Secretary,! Board of Trustees 




i 



Minutes of Meeting 

of the 

EXTENSION ADVISORY COUNCIL 

April 1, 1960 

Worcester, Massachusetts 



Present: Mr. Jonathan Davis, Mr. David F. Hayes, Mr. Henry Renouf, Mr. Harry Koch, 
Mr. Gilbert Blackledge, Mr. Philip N. Good*, Mr. Myron Maiewski, 
Mr. Luther Belden, Mr. Charles H. McNamara, Mr. Edward M. Dwyer, 
Mrs. Everett L. Martin, Mrs. Raymond Smith**, Mr. Lorenzo Lambson, 
Mr. Donald L. Crooks, Mr. Walter F. Lewis, Mr. William F. Stapleton, 
Dr. Lloyd H. Davis, Mr. Donald P. Allan. 

*-Mr. Philip N. Good, Staff Assistant, Massachusetts Farm Bureau 
Federation, represented Mr. Carleton I. Pickett. 

**-Mrs. Raymond Smith of Norfolk County, First Vice-President of the 
Massachusetts Home Demonstration Council, is a new member replacing 
Mrs. Farnham W. Smith of Middlesex County. 

ITEM NO. 1 



Dr. Davis, Associate Director of Extension, reviewed the discussions and 
actions of the January meeting of the Council. 



ITEM NO. 2 



1 



Mr. Lambson gave the report of the Extension Advisory Council Subcommittee 
on Regionalization and Fees. 



VOTED: 



VOTED: 



To support, in principle, the concept of charging, on a time basis, 
for the on-the-farm services of specialists. 

To establish a committee of the Council for the purpose of drafting 
appropriate legislation to develop regionalized agricultural exten- 
sion work within Massachusetts (committee to be appointed by Director 
Davis) . 



ITEM NO. 3 



Mr. Hayes gave the report of the Extension Advisory Subcommittee charged 
with considering a name change. 

VOTED : To work with the Farm Bureau in developing and securing adoption 
of legislation for a change in name from "Trustees for County Aid 

to Agriculture" to "Trustees of the County Extension 

Service." 



1 



VOTED : To recommend to the several county Boards of Trustees and to the 
Administration of the University of Massachusetts that sufficient 
records be maintained to determine the cost of operating the indi- 
vidual Extension programs in Agriculture, Home Economics, and 4-H 
Club and Youth Work. ( Note : Since several counties have plant 
maintenance items, it is presumed that these costs will be kept 
separate and so identified.) 



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Minutes of Extension Advisory Council Meeting of April 1, 1960- -Page 2 



1 



ITEM NO. 4 



Report by Walter Lewis of Middlesex County on a meeting held recently in 
that county to determine the needs for assistance from the Extension 
Service to the poultry industry. The opinion was unanimously expressed 
that the group wanted a highly trained poultry specialist, adequately paid, 
to serve the industry, in all probability in cooperation with other counties. 



ITEM NO. 5 



A statement of objectives, policies, and procedures was presented by Dr. 
Davis. This statement was approved, with revisions, as an operational plan 
(the revised plan is attached). In addition, several specific items were 
voted in connection with this plan as follows: 

VOTED : To instruct the Associate Director of Extension to initiate a 
pilot "regional project" as soon as possible. 

VOTED : To endorse immediately action on effecting the following procedural 
change in working with the livestock industry: "To have specialists 
serving industries with relatively few farmers work directly with 
those producers without involving the county staff." 



1 



VOTED : To hold for future consideration the following procedural recommenda- 
tion: "To secure agreement with counties on study leave for county 
workers similar to that available to University staff and county 
workers in most states." 

VOTED : To appoint representatives from the Extension Advisory Council to 
meet with the University Trustee Subcommittee on Agriculture on 
April 26, 1960. 



Respectfully submitted, 



S--4-7-60 
Copies sent to: 



Donald P. Allan, Secretary 



1 



H. Heyworth Backus, Mr. Luther Belden, Mr. Gilbert Blackledge, 
J. Warren Chadwick, Mr. Donald L. Crooks, Mr. Jonathan Davis, 
Edward M. Dwyer, Mr. Joseph Globus, Mr. Lyman W. Graves, 
Lloyd A. Hathaway, Mr. David F. Hayes, Mr. Arthur Howard, 
Harry Koch, Mr. Lorenzo Lambson, Mr. Walter F. Lewis, 
Myron Maiewski, Mrs. Everett L. Martin, Mr. Charles H. McNamara, 
. Carleton I. Pickett, Mr. William W. Pinney, Mr. Henry Renouf, 

Mrs. Raymond Smith, Mr. William F. Stapleton, Mr. Philip F. Whitmore, 

Dean Fred P. Jeffrey, Dr. Lloyd H. Davis. 



Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 



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PLAN FOR ADJUSTING EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE IN MASSACHUSETTS 

Approved as a Part of the Minutes 

of the Extension Advisory Council Meeting 

in Worcester, Massachusetts 

on April 1, 1960 

OBJECTIVES 

I. The first objective of Extension in Agriculture in Massachusetts is to help 
commercial farmers use their land, labor, capital and management resources 
to obtain satisfactory returns and desired levels of living for their fami- 
lies now and in the future. To accomplish this, we endeavor to provide 
facts, analysis and training -- 

(a) to help farmers decide on the most profitable and most satis- 
fying way to use and to improve their resources in light of 
present and probable future economic conditions and to place 
increased emphasis on aiding farmers to improve the efficiency 
of their marketing functions. 

(b) to help individual farmers and farm and rural families partici- 
pate effectively in group activities and decisions affecting 
the communities and markets in which they operate (markets for 
farm products and the inputs farmers use). 

(c) to help farmers and the general public take effective, enlight- 
ened action on public questions affecting the farmer's ability 
to use his resources profitably and so as to contribute to the 
economic development of the state. 

(d) to help marketers of farm products and farm supplies provide 
the needed qualities of materials and services efficiently and 
to stimulate a kind of competition among these firms that is 
beneficial to Massachusetts farmers. 

II. OTHER OBJECTIVES ARE : 

(a) to contribute to the economic development of Massachusetts land 
and water resources so they may make the greatest contribution 
to the many needs of the people of Massachusetts now and in the 
future. 

(b) to help part-time farmers make profitable and satisfying use of 
their land, labor, capital and management resources. 

(c) to aid in the general development of rural communities in 
Massachusetts. 

(d) within the limits of available resources, to interpret information 
from agricultural sciences for application by others who seek 
assistance. 

(e) to do these things in a way that is consistent with a responsi- 
bility to the public for efficient use of Extension resources and 
for safe, pure food and water supplies. 



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Flan far Adjusting Extension Work in Agriculture in Masaachus«tt» — i 

policies 

» I ,. % ,M •■■II 

A. To provide for most effective use of Extension resources by adjusting program 
and organization to changing needs through the use of advisory councils and 
committees. 

PROCEDURES 

1. To rely strongly on the Extension Advisory Council for guidance 
in determining administrative policy and procedure. 

2. To rely strongly on representative farmers for guidance in deter- 
mining program emphasis in agriculture. 

3. To cooperate fully with commercial concerns and other public 
agencies in working toward common objectives and to avoid 
duplicating services. 

B. To devote a major part of the resources at our disposal to serving commercial 
farmers in ways consistent with the intent of the appropriating bodies. 

C. To devote a significant part of the Federal Smith -Lever funds to county or 
regional work with commercial farmers. 

D. To provide budget and fiscal procedures that enable appropriating bodies and 
the public to evaluate use of Extension funds. 

E. To use Agricultural Marketing Act funds in financing work in the marketing 
system on projects approved by the United States Department of Agriculture. 

4. Increased funds provided from 1955 through 1958 to be used as 
intended by Congress. A long-range plan to accomplish this will 
be developed and the funds will be reassigned in line with Con- 
gressional intent and the needs of Massachusetts. 

5. The overall allocation of Federal Smith-Lever funds will be 
approximately in the ratio: 60% Agriculture, 20% Heme Economics, 
20% 4-H. 

6. Adjustments will be made in the use of Federal Smith-Lever funds 
so that about 60% are used in county and regional work. 

7. To maintain a reserve of Federal Smith -Lever funds available 
for hiring temporary workers to do special jobs and encourage 
counties to include in their budgets funds for hiring part- 
time workers to help conduct special programs. 

8. Budgets for expenditures at the College will be broken down by 
program, and expenditure records will be kept on the same basis. 
(By: 4-H, Home Economics, and Agriculture; within Agriculture 
by departments and by services — Extension, Teaching, Research, 
and Control.) 






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Plan for Adjusting Extension Work in Agriculture in Massachusetts — 3 

9. To recommend to the counties that their financial records and 
budgets be kept by program as will be done at the College. (The 
Memorandum of Agreement will be changed to this effect.) 

F. To effect limited development of regional work where its need is most apparent 
by use of federal and county funds made available by position vacancies and 
by inter-county agreement with the University. 

G. To maintain at the University a staff of highly trained, specialized workers 
to help and train county workers and to work directly with farmers on prob- 
lems best handled by University personnel. 

H. To assign to county workers work that can be done adequately within the county, 
and work that cannot be handled adequately on a county basis to be done 
regionally by inter-county cooperation with the University, and that work that 
can be handled adequately only by the University staff to be handled in this 
way. 

I. To redirect and strengthen on- the- farm assistance, using the unit approach; 
to expand educational work in marketing and utilization of agricultural prod- 
ucts; and to strengthen educational work pertaining to public decisions 
affecting the use of agricultural resources. 

10. To participate in filling vacancies only after the Trustees, in 
cooperation with the Extension Director, have evaluated the 
needs and decided which are to receive priority and the best 
way of serving these. 

11. If increased appropriations are received from Congress this 
year, bring adjustments in work of existing College staff to 
serve the need expressed by Congress and use a part of the 
increased funds to effect needed development of regional 
work. 

12. To have specialists serving industries with relatively few 
farmers work directly with those producers without involving 
the county staff. This will provide improved service, use 
personnel more efficiently, and enable county workers to 
specialize more on major types of farming. This procedure 
may be developed in Livestock and Fruit as it presently is 
with Florists and Cranberry producers. 

13. To redirect an increased part of the work of agricultural 
personnel to on- the- farm problem- solving work- -this is to 
include more intensive field study of specific problems with 
compilation and analysis of data for industry-wide use. Also 
to reduce time spent on "program planning" and miscellaneous 
activity. 

14. To expand work with farmers in marketing and utilization of 
agricultural products. 



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Plan for Adjusting Extension Work in Agriculture in Massachusetts- -4 

15. To redirect resources directly serving individuals of the 
general public in the field of general horticulture to work 
with horticultural firms and mass media outlets serving this 
general public. 

16. To develop means of selling publications so that printing and 
mailing costs are paid by the user and to provide publications 
that will answer the bulk of the questions asked by the gen- 
eral public with a minimum of time of professional workers. 

J. To provide, in cooperation with counties, regional specialists to serve 
farmers in program and problem areas which counties are unable to handle 
adequately. 

17. To secure adoption of a pay scale for regional workers that 
extends approximately from the low salary of an Instructor 
to the high for Associate Professor ($5,460 to $9,828). 

18. To develop and secure adoption of a "Freedom Bill" that will 
make possible the employment of regional specialists by pro- 
viding the flexible salary structure needed. 

19. To employ regional specialists who have an M.S. degree and quali- 
fications comparable to University staff members. (For employ- 
ment as regional specialists, present county workers must 
qualify for admittance into the University's Graduate School 

and undertake a graduate program leading to a Master's degree.) 

20. To study opportunities to consolidate present county adminis- 
trative work into regional management of county work. 

K. To improve the ability of existing county staff to serve the changing needs 
of farmers. 

21. Study the training needs of present county staff for the 
purpose of developing training to improve their ability to 
contribute to solving technical problems of commercial 
farmers. 

22. Request from University Trustees authority for county workers 
to take University courses on same basis as University staff. 



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S--4-7-60 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS - 



] 



MEMORANDUM y 



P 

„ Dr. Lloyd H. Davis ,. April 27, 1960 

From * Date „. _ 

_, Dr. John Gillespie 

Subject 



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You will recall that we were requested to revise Objective I (c) of 
the Plan for Adjusting Extension Work in Agriculture in Massachusetts 
in line with the discussion at the meeting of the Trustee Committee 
on Agriculture and Horticulture in the President's Office on April 26. 

Following is the original statement: 

"(c) to help farmers and the general public take 
effective, enlightened action on public questions 
affecting the farmer's ability to use his resources 
profitably and so as to contribute to the economic 
development of the state." 

We submit the following revision for the approval of the committee. 

"(c) to provide farmers and the general public with 
objective information on public questions pertaining 
to agriculture and the use of agricultural resources 
and products so as to aid the farmer in maximizing 
the profitable use of his resources and so as to 
contribute to the economic development of the state. 
(No educational or other activity is contemplated nor 
will be condoned that uses public monies to influence 
state or federal legislation, by favoring or opposing, 
whether before or after the introduction of, a specific 
bill or resolution.)" 



/s/ Lloyd H. Davis 
Associate Director of Extension 










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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

May 17, 1960, 10:30 a.m., Dr. Brett's Office 

Boston Mutual Life Insurance Co., 156 Stuart Street, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Haigis, Hoftyzer, 
McDermott, Schuck, Whitmore; also 
Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson, Mr. Hugill 



The committee reviewed the status of the building projects 

of the University of Massachusetts. 

It considered the long-time capital outlay program and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it approve the five-year capital outlay 
program as set forth in Attachment A to 
these minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes . 



2241 



The meeting adjourned at 12:15 p.m 




illespi 

oard of/ Trustees 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



2242 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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Attachment "A" 
liay 12, I960 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Susotary of Ten-Year Capital Outlay Program 



Fiscal 
Year 


Esroiltaenfc 


Maes. 

Ooilege-Age 
Population 
18-21 Yr. Olds 


Knrollrocint 

as a 
Percent of 
College-Age 
Population 


Estinated Coot 

All 

Buildings 
Except. Dorms. Dormitories 


1961 


Sept. 1960 


- 6,400 


265,465 


2.4 


$ - 


$ 3,500,000 


1962 


Sept. 1961 


. 6,900 


286,471 


2.4 


6,813,000 


3,500,000 


1963 


Sept. 1962 


- 7,400 


298,004 


2.5 


5-188,000 


3,600,000 


1964 


Sept. 1963 


- 8,400 


305,156 


2.0 


7,016,000 


3,730,000 


196S 


Sept. 1964 


- 9,400 


316,435 


3.0 


3,8*0,000 


3,800,000 


1966 


Sept, 1965 


10,400 


337,184 

Total 


3.1 


5,400,000 


3,900, 000 




$28,227,000 


$22,000,000 






Total 


- including Bowaiteries 
Tentative Prograua 


$50,227,000 




1967 


Sept. 1966 - 


11,400 


354,704 


3.2 


$ 4,795,000 


$ 4,000,000 


1968 


Sept. 1967 - 


12,400 


371,960 


3.3 


4,880,000 


4,100,000 


1969 


Sept, 1968 - 


13,400 


374,799 


3.6 


4,350,000 


4,200,000 


1970 


Sept. 1969 - 


14,400 


368,306 


3.9 


6,000,000 




1971 


Sept. 1970 » 


15,400 


369,397 


4.2 


None 





Total $20,025,000 $12,300,000 

Total - including Do*jaifcorias 32,325,000 



GRAK9 TOTAL $82,552,000 



This program is predicated on the continuation of the existing 
curricultsa of the University, it is subject to annual review by 
the Trustees with tha flexibility of adding or nsedifying educational 
progrsas as nay be adopted by the Board of Trustees. 



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February 12, I960 



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WXVmSTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PfcOGaAK 
Becoamcndad by the Governor 
in his Budget Jfessage 



Addition to Utilities $ 400,000 

Continuation of steam, electric, wacer* 
sewerage utilities program to serve now 
structures. 

Natural Resources Building 1,660,000 

To house JJeparfcaaat of Forestry and Wildlife 
&anagett£at > for Instruction, present buildings 
are obsolete and unsafe. 

Addition to Food Technology Building 1,508,000 

To acccaraodat© increased enrollment for 
instruction and research in the field of food 
proces sing. 

Addition to Physics Building 2,100,000 

Present building is inadequate due to enroll- 
ment increases ' 

Physical Education Building for Men ' 2,500,000 

Physical Education is required by freshman 
and sophomores , present facilities will not 
handle increased enrollment- 

Engineering Building and Service Building 1,915,000 

For Esperiaeat Station essential to permit the 
School of Engineering to offer adequate in- 
struction in various branches of engineering 
at the undergraduate and graduate level. 

Dining Ceuareus 110,000 

Present facilities are inadequate for the 
enrollment . 

Classroom and Offices - School of Business Adminis** 1,603,000 
ttatlon, to provide additional classrooms for 
increased enrollment. 

Science Center Section 4 3,816,000 

To complete the Science Center by providing 
apace for total need of bacteriology, soology, 
geology, etc. 

Fine Arts Building 100,000 
Instructional facilities for Fine Arts in- 
cluding painting, scuJpture, drama, music, etc. 



Total $15,732,000 



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l« ,900(000 

irnder r 

. Ird Sei 
Ha3 1 , To 

tilding 2... loo, 000 

. «rfts, nwa 

■ for 1,000 Studen&e, lnelttdii 3,500,000 

furnishing A ®ml c jcfcioa and plans 

fiscal 1963 doratfeories 

400 

4, UtlliKf 

To pro-vlel© ste&in aleefcric, e >®r 

8-?.r' build!'' 

Poul 000 

■ replacl 
Suroa crs rr, opus. S 

5» end At Field*, Including 700. 

replacemont ia Alumni Field and 

tier mqv.: > 

on o£ Alur 
oca fos new buildin. iter 

tile 

7. Co&l Siding .and land purchase 530,000 

necessary; 

Bulk i >r teal wi< ng siding; 

■d truck loading fae: i to handle con- 

tlauouel^ increasing fconnag* ftl end 

complying wifeh Town or Asabaret official raqveat* 
to ; 

Town aid J lor the 

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>ita.l Outlay Pi 
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Capital Ck- urogram 

• -63 



Adffiloist - £»8* Including fuxni 

& equlpsss 



























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«4~ 

Capital Outlay psrcgraiB 
Fiacsi Hear 1963 



of M 
So, 



21. En| 

: 

22. ,000 

■ ■ : 

23. Halves .000 

St. :.. 

iozs 

used .." 

and sq 







Tot. 



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0..000 

■ 

- 
Bee 

jr Che : 

Unive- 

486,01 

000 

of bai 

000 

■ ■ - 
stri "Of? 



Total $10,716,000 



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-6- 

Capital Outlay Frogi 
. :al ¥eav IS65 



U o:. 
Pjrioirifcy 

ffltioaal .as, includ 

naishing 

Las \CiG0 

33 .itcsry 3,SGO,ttOO 

Lee - 

■ 

2 s C0O o 00O 
ocjuxpiaent 

3"/, -.3 3C0.00O 

33. Additional as) 110,000 

west i 
3ej 

39. 3C0 S G00 

Gooc lag Ana 

40. Graduate ,is) 150 

tha 
v.lciai . 

contvaci: . bus. 






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UNIVSaSZW 01? MA8SACEB8ESTS 



Tentative Capita' Fiscal 

Years 1967- 19 71 



1967 



Priority 

$0 

49 v 



SO,, 
51. 

32. 

■9*3 o 

34. 

55. 
56. 



fcudcuts to br: 

.00 by £ 

Utilities 

ill 
ioo3. of Hducation 

,es 
ation hi - i ry 
rooja Bui 
is for Addifcic 



Amount 

'4 4,000,000 



200,000 
1.309,000 

500,000 
2,000,000 

75,000 
120,000 



1 



57- 

S3. 

61. 

63. 
64. 






[68 

Ufcil 

Union 

Adoxtioxi fco ;/; 

seal Research Bu: 
on to f. 
: 
Obei Lory School <;/. 



oco 



100,060 

,000 

2,000,(100 
2.-500,000 

50,000 
40, 

SO ,000 






$ 0,DS;: ; 



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65* Dor ..000 

66., 20u 

&?<, oco 

■ 

&9„ 

;h) 
70. ns) ; 00Q 

71 o 150,000 






197© 

72 , Xs 

74. ,000 

73, ,000 









sols 
>t prev 



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COMMITTEE 



1 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
May 24, 1960, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 
Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Haigis, 
Hoftyzer, Schuck, Whitmore; also 
Provost McCune, Secretary Gillespie, 
Treasurer Johnson, Mr. Hall Nichols, 
Miss Joan Smith, Mr. Britton 

The capital outlay program for the next five years at 

the University of Massachusetts was discussed. On recommendation 

of the Chairman and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they adopt the five-year capital 
outlay program as set forth in Attach- 
ment A to these minutes and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

Trustee Brett explained the status of the University of 

Massachusetts Building Association and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the adoption of the following resolution. 

"whereas the decision of the Supreme Judicial Court 
in Ayer v. Commissioner which held unconstitutional 
the act (Chapter 603, Acts of 1958) creating the 
State Office Building Association has cast con- 
siderable doubt on the legality of the outstanding 
obligations of the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association and has made it impossible 
for the Corporation to sell additional bonds and 
to continue its normal operation, now therefore, 
be it resolved 

"To solicit the assistance of the Governor of the 
Commonwealth in remedying this serious situation. 
It is respectfully suggested that the following 
courses of action be taken to preserve the integrity of 
the Association's obligations now outstanding and 
to avoid the necessity of further curtailing the 
badly needed expansion of the University as pre- 
viously planned and be it further resolved 



2243 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Resolution 



2244 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"That the Commonwealth itself or by a public authority 
or in a manner decreed by the Legislature in its 
wisdom irrevocably assume and undertake to pay or cause 
to be paid as when due from time to time the principal 
and interest on the serial bonds of the University of 
Massachusetts Building Association heretofore issued 
and now outstanding together with the incidental 
charges payable by the said Association as provided 
in the trust indenture securing said bond. (A 
suggested form of bill to accomplish this result has 
already been submitted to the Commissioner of Administra- 
tion and Finance.) 

"That there be included in the capital outlay program 
for the fiscal year 1961 the total additional sum of 
$7,700,000 made up as follows: (a) $2,300,000 to 
cover the cost of plans, construction cost and furnish- 
ings for two dormitories for which working drawings 
already approved by the Board of Trustees are completed 
and immediately available to house approximately 590 
students and to be ready for occupancy in September 1961. 
(b) $3,500,000 for plans, construction cost and furnish- 
ings for housing of approximately 1,000 students to be 
ready for occupancy in September 1962. (c) $1,900,000 
for plans, construction cost, furnishings and kitchen 
equipment for a new dining hall to accommodate the in- 
creased enrollment to be made possible by the dormitory 
expansion above recommended. ($110,000 of this amount 
to cover plans only has already been included in the 
capital outlay program for 1961) 

"It should be kept in mind also that a program of this 
size will necessitate the employment of additional 
personnel which should be provided in the operational 
budget . 

"The Trustees recognize the fact that this will not 
be an easy program to carry out on time but due to 
the pressure for admission, we believe that every 
possible effort should be made to meet it." 

A discussion concerning consulting architects to advise 

the Board of Trustees as to the future design and style of 

architecture for the campus was held. On motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 



COMMITTEE 



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II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee be 
authorized to draw up an agreement defining 
what the consulting architects are to do 
and to urge the Commissioner of Administra- 
tion to appoint the following three 
architects: Saarinen, Stone, Abramawitz. 

The meeting adjourned at 12 o'clock noon. 




Secretary 



2245 



Architects 



2246 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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U8SV8K9m 



Sua«B*3cy o£ 






>> . 2960 • 6 >400 



KOroXlsjeKt Eg'.-.iaatc-d Coat 

Ma as -a 

ColJesfc-ii' P« of Ail 

Popul!: Cc Age Buildivgs 

18»21 Yg. Olds j^2Hl£iiI£S. iffic-ep*-: P$ l 7? : v O w? 



J65,46S 



2.4 .S,421,000 $ 5 ; ,800„- 



1.962 8«pt. 1961 - 7,000 

»M Sspfc, 1952 - 

j Sapfc, 1963 - 9 

i Slept . 1964 » 10,000 

Sapfc, 1965 - 1?. ; ,000 



286,473 




13,000 


3,500, 


298 ,< 


2.7 


5,188,000 


3,ftoe 


305/ 


3.0 


7„0A6,,000 


3,700, 


31.6, 


3.2 


3,810,000 


2,800,000 




3,3 


5,400. 


3,900,000 



To&al 



.345-000 $2< 



Total - Las > Bosai $6S 6 148 a 000 



Tht-3 pt-.TgraBs i« j>r»dlc«c«dl era th« consignation of fche 
exi*fciag curriculum of the Oalvassity. Ic ia aubj«&£ to oaauci 

r«v£aw by the* Trustees with the £l«xibility of *«s<itftg or modifying 

*«ue«t:io»:Al jwogssa* as &&$ be acioptssd % fcha Board ot Trusfcaaa. 



r 



i 



ii 



I 



U of K 
Priority 

1, 



2. 



j 



3o 



4. 



7. 



i 



CAPITAL OUTLAY fl 
For Ptsc-: 



Dorstitories 

For Sepfce >1 latent 7,009 

'Sing 590 
Fc- Snrollasent 8,< 

Housing 1,000 

Includes fu-raie'L ■ 



Auount 



300,000 

3,500,000 
[00,000 



.3 d< 

slf-liet 



; - 



G S« Tree 
COSffiORS 1*900 

PffGSftE". inades; 

e»3?oI2sBc:2t » This . 

liquidating by ; . State Treasurer. 

Sclents Center Section 4 « la ad; to Federal 3,523, 

To ecaplsta the Science Cent ::*-<tevi..di 

space for total need of b ology* 

a oology j, geology f e 

Addition to Physics Bisiiding 2,100,1 

Pre. xilding 1b ins ne to cnroll- 

teff-ne iac 

Addition to Utilities 

Continuation of St 
sewerage ufciiitic 
sfcructi 

>oa <xnd Office 1 ? 603. 

Ac--. .oa 

To provide addition.?.! classrooms for 
ased anrollraent . 

Phys 2,992,' 

Physical Education ia sen 

end sophomores; ■ ies wiH not 

handle increased enrollment* 

Ha&ursl Resources Building 

To house Bepartsxenv. of Forestry and 
Wildlife Manageneiv. instruction - 

present buildings are obsolete and 
unsafe, 



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-2- 

CAPXTAL GC7LAY PROGRAM 

?or Fiscal Year X961 



U oi 
Priority 



Addition to Food Technology I In (4,508,003 

lor to Faderel Funds 

Tc ste inc aarolltnant U 

inetrt 

food processing* 

10c Fina Arts Build. 110 , 000 

Instructions! facilities for Fin 
including painting, sculpture, drama, 
snsic., efci 

il« Engineering Building and Setviea Building 1,915,000 

For Espariaent Station essential to parait 
the School of Sngii g co qxx&z adequate 
instruct ion in various branchet 
engineer lug at the 
graduate lev* 



.'21,000 



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13 of H 

Priority 



2, 



3o 



ll 



1961 < 

•:e for .ng 

HiS&Ci d: 2d 

subj " 

ty EuLldit! ' 1 6 000 ■ • Mug 

:nlshingi 

September 19 

Necessary s:e i to 

9,000 students by Sepi 1963, 

TUes® dorsiifceries Will be S3.ti'»Jliquidatitsg 

£rcs> student srantais paid fco State Treasurer. 

Utilities 

To provide stcasij. i 3nd sewer 

services fco new building 

Poultry Fleas Laboratory <2rcd Buildir 

lacing 












Physical B&se;y 
replacement a 
other Gquip-^ 

on of Alt 

of the corpus, 

tee en the JGaster Pi - so the 
sxleting . 

ding and ■ 

Bu3 sg 

■ 

ecffipr. ith Town of An al 

sent 

unloading en Town siding that is inadequate 
.for Che com 






000 



3,500,000 



400 000 



000 









m Priority Ho. 7. 



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I 



I 



1 



I 



Capital Outlay Program 
Fiscal Year 1962 



of M 

Priority 

35b, 3&ffl Amount 

6. Reconstruction o£ Paved Areas f including reads $ 300,000 
& Sidewalks 

9. Recondition Interior o£ Older Buildings, including 500,000 
Fernald Hall, Clark Hall* Engineering Anneo: and 
Others 

Project to cover the necessary interior re- 
construction and repair of structures being 
vacated by departments being reeved into net? 
structures » such as Science Center, and 
required fcr reassignment and exspansion of 
other departments. 

10. Hew Administration Building (Plans) 110,000 

Preparation of 'preliminary and working plans 
for a new Administration Building in accordance 
with approved site plan prepared by the Fira 
of Campbell and Aldrich. Architects. This will 
permit use of South College for classrooms and 
faculty offices . 

11. Lecture Sail Addition to Machner Kail (£laus) 15,000 

Plans for construction of three large lecture 
halls on western side of Machmer Hall to 
provide for teaching larger classes. 

12. Horticultural Science and Greenhouses (Plans) 88*000 

Construction of additional acaderalc and 
classroom space and greenhouses as supplement 
to BovditcU Hall, 

(Note change oi title frctn Plant Science) 

Total $8,513,000 



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-3- 

Capital Outlay Program 
Fiscal Year 1963 



u o£ n 
Priority 

Mo„ Item Afaount 



13. Administration Building, including furnishings $2,500,000 

& cauipusant 

Required to provide adequate and centralised 
facilities for campus administration and to 
xoafce South College available for additional 
faculty offices and classrooms. 

14. Addition to Maehacx Mall, including furnishings 252,000 

& equipment 

To provide for three large lecture rooms to 
round out facilities available to teach 
large classes. 

15. Utilities 200,000 

Steam, electric » water & sewer to new buildings. 

16. Dormitory Buildings for 1,000 Students^ including 3,600,000 

furnishings and plaits for September 1964 derate. 
Required if not provided by Building Association 
and In order to register 10 9 000 students by 
September 1964. 

17. Horticultural Science and Greenhouses 1,650,000 

To provide classrooms, laboratories, offices 
and greenhouses. This permits the grouping of 
teaching and research in horticultural sciences 
in one location. Space now used in other 

buildings is needed for reassignment for ex- 
pansion of other departments. 

18. Reconstruction of Paved Areas including roads & 300,000 

sidewalks 

19. Classroom Building (Business Administration * Plans) 75,000 

Second building for School of Business 
Administration in accordance with area plan and 
jsodsl prepared by Campbell & Aldrich, Architects, 
and required to support curricula of Graduate 
and Undergraduate School of Business Administration. 

20. Assembly Hall and Field House (Plans) 139,000 

This is a multipurpose building to serve as an 
assembly hall to seat the entire student body 
for comaeacectents, convocations, concerts, etc., 
with alternate use for basketball and other 
indoor spectator sports. 



I 



I 



I 



Capital Outlay program 
Fiscal Vear 1963 



U of M 
Priority 

21. 



22. 



23. 



Item 

Engineering Study of Generating Electricity 
Study required to determine feasibility of 
generating additional electricity efc the 
campus and to fora a basis for negotiating 
renewal of electrical utility contract. 

Astronotay laboratory and Classroaat Building (Plans) 

Sew structure not on Master Plan proposed for 
location east of the President's Rouse to 
provide housing for 20" telescope (gift to the 
University) with classrooms and supporting space. 

University Warehouse (plans) 

General wareheus<4 for the University to provide 
storage for bulk ssaterials not; stored outside, 
furniture, central storage for folding chairs 
used for setting up special events , storage 
for incoming furniture and equipment for net? 
structures, required for ecoodsicai operation of 
the University. 



^totp uat 
$ 10,000 



20,000 



42,000 



Total 



$8,788,000 



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-5- 

Capital Outlay Program 
Fiscal Year 1964 



of M 

Priority 

No. Item Amount 

24. Classroom Building (Business Administration) , $1,900,000 

including furnishings and equlpiaent 

25. Utilities - Steam, electric, water & sewer for 200,000 

new buildings 

26. dormitory Buildings for 1,000 Students, 3,700,000 

including furnishings and plans for September 

1966 dormitories 

Required if not provided by Building 
Association and in order to register 11,000 
students by September 1965 . 

27. Assembly Kail and Field House, including 3,000,000 

furnishings and equipment 

28. Recondition Interior of Older Buildings, in- 300,000 

eluding Marshall Kail, Shade Tree Laboratories, 
South College and Others 

Project to cover the necessary interior 
reconstruction and repair of structures 
being vacated by departments being moved 
into new structures such as Science Center 
and required for assignment and espanoion 
of other depar fcsaents . 

29. University Warehouse 1,000,000 

30 o Astfccnoay laboratory & Classroom Buildings in- 486,000 
eluding furnishings and equipment 

31. Educational TV and Radio Facilities (Plans) 30,000 

Construction of building and procurement 
of equipment for central educational TV 
and radio facilities on the caseous in- 
cluding transmitting facilities for 
integration with educational network on 
Kfc. Lincoln. 

32. Animal Science Building <Plans) 100,000 

Preliminary and working plans for con- 
struction of Animal Science Laboratory 
Building. 



Total $10, 716 ; 000 



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I 



Capital Outlay Prograra 
Fiscal Year 1965 



of M 

Priority 

Jo. Item Amount: 



33. Educational t? and Sadio Facilities* including $ 750,000 

furnishings and equipment 

34. Utilities 200,000 

35. Soraitory Building for 1,000 Students inelud 3,800,000 

furnishings and loeltidiag plans for September 
196? dormitories - in ordey to register 12,000 
stndeafcs by September 1966. 

36. Animal Science Building, including; furnishings and 2*000,000 

aquipsaent 

37. Reconstruction of Paved arose, including sidewalks 300,000 

and streets 

38. Additional Oining Coramons (Plana) 110,000 

Rorf&ag Plans for dining facilities in the north- 
west corner of the* canpus to serve new dornsitorias 
ia that area. Keeded to feed students in 
September 1966 when enrollseat reaches 11,400. 

39. Recondition Interior of Older Suiidiogs, including 300,000 

Goodcll Library and Engineering Annex 

40. Graduate Research Facilities (Plans) 150,000 

Laboratory and office space to be located in the 
vicinity of Engineering Buildings to provide 
centralised graduate research including large 
contract progratsa.. 



total $7,610,000 



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I 



I 



I 



I 



Capital Outlay Program 
Fiscal Year 1966 



a of h 

Priority 
No. Item faomat 

41. UtiXities $ 200,000 

StsaWj electric, water & sewer for new 
buildings. 

42. Additional Dining Commons, including furoish&nga 2.000,000 

& equipment 

?or additional Dining Commons at the north- 
west corner of the campus to serve new 
dormitory complex. 

43. Dormitory Buildings for 1,000 Students, including 3,900,000 

furnishings and plans for September 1968 
&equired in orflor to register 13,000 students 
by September 196?. 

44. Graduate Research Facilities, including furnishings 3,000,000 

and equipment 

45. Addition to Skinner Hail (Plans) 50,000 

Addition in accordance with Master Plan to 
provide integrated facilities for School of 
Kursing and Department of Some Bconondca. 

46. Cranberry Station Laboratory {Plans) 20,000 

47. School of Education Addition (Plans) 30 3 000 

48. Engineering Laboratories (Plans) 100,000 



1 



Total $9,300,000 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

June 28, 1960, 10:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Chairman Brett presiding 

PRESENT : Brett, Fox, Cashin , Healey, Pumphret, Treasurer 
Johnson, Provost McCune and Budget Commissioner 
Morrissey and Trustee Crowley 

Treasurer Johnson explained the requirements for matching 

funds for the National Defense Student Loan Program. The University 

has exhausted the gift of Murray D. Lincoln of over $5,000 which 

had previously been used for matching funds. The University of 

Massachusetts Foundation has offered to loan funds to the Trustees 

for this purpose and has available $2,000 now authorized for this 

purpose and an additional $5,000 for this year with a like amount 

already raised for the following year. On motion made and duly 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept the offer of the University of Massachusetts 
Foundation of a loan of $2,000 plus such additional 
sums as may from time to time be needed and made 
available by the Foundation for use as the University's 
one- tenth share of matching funds under the National 
Defense Student Loan Program it being a condition of 
this loan that interest will be paid to the Foundation 
at the same rates and on the same terms as collected 
under the provisions of the National Defense Education 
Act of 1958 and that the principal shall be repaid to 
the Foundation upon termination of the student loan 
program or sooner at the discretion of the Trustees. 

Provost McCune and Treasurer Johnson explained the 

advanced research in the field of polymers being done by Dr. 

Richard S. Stein and his group in the Chemistry Department. Dr. 

Stein is recognized as a world authority in this field and is being 

pressed by many corporations and foundations to advance his polymer 

research on a larger basis. The Committee discussed in some detail 

the proposed prospectus for a Polymer Research Institute. On a 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 



2247 



National 
Defense 
Student 
Loan Fund 



2248 



COMMITTEE 



Polymer 

Research 

Institute 



Endowment 
Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To approve in principle the draft submitted for the 
establishment of a Polymer Research Institute in 
accordance with the prospectus - Attachment "I", and 
to authorize the establishment of a trust fund 
account entitled "Polymer Research Institute Fund" 
on the books of the University for the implementation 
of the Institute on a self-supporting basis. 

VOTED : To establish a committee consisting of Healey, 

Chairman; Fox, Pumphret with Brett, ex officio, to 
review the prospectus for the Polymer Research Insti- 
tute to put it in legal form. In so doing the com- 
mittee was charged with the responsibility of: 

1. obtain an official opinion from the Attorney 
General on trust fund operations of the Trustees 

2. prepare a model plan for future research institutes 

3. recommend a relationship of such institutes to a 
possible future research foundation 

4. develop a patent policy for the University. 



The Committee reviewed the expenditures in Attachment" II" 



* 



I 



and 



VOTED : To approve the expenditures of the President from 
unrestricted income from Endowment Funds and from 
the University Fund through June 17, 1960, as per 
Attachment "II". 

In continuance of this program, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to spend in the year 
beginning June 18, 1960 to June 30, 1961 for the 
furtherance of the University program such sums as 
in his discretion are necessary from the income on 
unrestricted Endowment Funds not to exceed $1,000 
and such additional sums from unrestricted current 
gifts to the University Fund as may become avail- 
able not to execced $2,500 for the period. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that the two Receiving 

Tellers in their handling of over $2,000,000 in cash during the 

year had a cash variance of an overage of $14.83. On motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 



■ 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



2249 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To write off the cash variance of the Receiving 

Tellers for the period July 1, 1959 to June 27, 1960, 
in the amount of an overage of $14.83 to the Trust 
Fund Interest Account. 

The Committee reviewed the security holdings in the 

Endowment Fund and after discuss of specific securities, it was 

VOTED : To sell the following common stocks: 
250 shares Indiana Limestone 
54 shares Interlake Steamship Company 
32 shares The Joseph & Feiss Company 
66 shares Transamerica 

It was noted that there was $38,000 of invested cash 

principal with which additional securities could be purchased. 

The Committee discussed the need of having continuing investment 

advice from professional investment counsel and asked that the 

Chairman explore the possibility of obtaining such counsel and 

report to the next meeting of the Committee. Pending action on 

securing investment counsel, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to invest $38,000 in U. S. 
Governments of not over six months' maturity. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




Kenneth W. Johnson, -Secretary pro tem 



Stocks 



2250 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



I 



ATTACHMENT 



POLLER RESEARCH AT TEE UNIVERSITY OP MASSACHUSETTS 



A program of fundamental research on the physical chemistry of high-polymers 
has teen in progress in the Department of Chemistry of the University of 
liassachus atts for the past ten years. The purpose of the program has been to 
develop methods for studying the structure of solid plastics, rubbers and fibers 
and to establish the relationship between structure and properties of these 
materials. Attempts have been and are being made to understand such propertiec 
as brittleness, elasticity, strength, flexibility and cloudiness in terms of 
mole cular pr ope rt ie s . 

The methods developed in this laboratory are principally ontical ones and 
include x-ray diffraction, infrared dichroism, birefringence and solid-state 
light scattering. Many of the applications of those methods originate with and 
are unique to this group. Their development has served in the education of 
chemistry graduate students in this field. On the basis of this research, s:x 
PhD degrees and five M.S. degrees have been awarded and two post-doctoral 
students have been trained. 

The majority of the %vork has been carried out without direct financial 
sunport of the Commonwealth Grants from outside sponsors such as the Office of 
Faval Research, The Research Corporation, The p etroleum Research Fund of the 
American Chemical Society, The National Science Foundation, and the Plax 
Corporation have amounted to over .200^,000 over the ten year period. Host of 
this money has been used to provide for graduate fellowships for students and to 
purchase equipment and supplies. Over '•40,000 worth of capital equipment has 
been purchased or constructed in this manner,title to which remains with the 
University. 

Over thirty publications have resulted from the research urogram which have 
appeared in such journals as the Journal of Applied Physics, Journal of Polymer 
Science, heview of Scientifio Instruments, Journal of Chemical Education and 
Annals of the New York Academy of Science. Papers have been presented at over 



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twenty national scientific meetings as well as two international meetings in 
Prague, Czechoslovakia and Fottingham, England. 

The new addit5.on to the Goessmann Chemical Laboratory has provided 
excellent facilities and space for a continuation of this work at an increased 
pace. 



p 



i 



ATTACHMENT T 



PROSPECTUS FOR A POLYMER RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

I, Purpose; An extended program of polymer (plastic) research is 
■being carried out in the Chemistry Department of the University of Massachu- 
setts. This is currently being supported by a contract with the Office of 
Naval Research and by grants from the National Science Foundation, the 
Petroleum Research ITund and the Plax Corp. The work has been concerned 
with establishing a relationship between the structure of polymers and 
their properties. The wor.s has been of considerable interest to a num- 
ber of industries wfco have approached the group to explore their in- 
terest in undertaking a fundamental research program of mutual interest as 
well as for some specialized types of problems. 

The University has been limited in its ability to undertake such work 
because of the lack of research and service personnel with time assignable 
to such work. Research associates could be hired who would assist in ihis 
work and contribute to a number of projects. It is proposed that this be 
done through a "Polymer Research Institute", as a Trust Fund of the 
University. 

II. Organization: The "Institute" shall be responsible to the Beard 
of Trustees and shall report to the President. A Director of the Insti- 
tute who should be a member of the faculty of the University shall be 
appointed by the President of the University. An advisory committee shall 
te appointed by tho President consisting of members of the University 
faculty, administration, and representatives of the polymer industry. This 
committee should meet periodically ^ith the Director, University Treasurer, 
and Provost to review the policy of the Institute and make recommenda- 
tions. 

All contracts and grants entered into by the Institute shall be 
approved by the Treasurer and Provost of the University. All actions of 
the institute shall he subject to review by the University Research Council 
and the University Senate who may make recommendations to the University 
Administration. 



III. Institute Activities; The Institute shall be empowered to: 

a. Accept grants for fundamental research 

b. Enter into contracts in support of fundamental research 

c. Enter into contracts for specific research problems. 

The activities of the Institute shall be such as to emphasize funda- 
mental rather than applied type research problems. Any specific research 
problems undertaken shall be of such nature that the University facilities 
are unique for their solution and should not be of a routine nature and not 
of a type that is normally carried out by private consulting laboratories 
in the Commonwealth. The majority of the work shall he of such nature as 
to be publishable in the scientific literature. 



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IV. Financing: The Institute shall he self- supporting and operating 
expenses shall be derived from payments and overhead on grants and contracts. 
A fraction of the overhead agreeable to the Treasurer of the University and 
the Director shall he deposited in the Trust Fund account for disbursement 
for non- Institute purposes. 

V* Personnel; In addition to the Director the Institute may employ 
(1) service personnel whi?h may include a secretary and a research technician, 
and (2) research personnel -which may include 

(a) Research esscciete(s) 

(b) Post- doctoral feliow(s) 

(c) Visiting scientists) 

(d) Research fellovs (part time graduate students) 

Graduate students would work on problems acceptable to the University for 
theses and shell be responsible to their Graduate School advisory committees „ 
Their problems shall be ones of fundamental research and shall not be of 
routine or service nature. 



VI. Salaries: The salaries of all personnel other than the Director 
shall be derived from Institute Contracts and Grants. The Director's University 
teaching salary msq; be supplemented from Institute funds at a rate consistant 
with University policy. Graduate students shall be compensated at a rate 
consistent with Urlversity graduate fellowship stipends. 

VII. Reports: The Institute shall make annual reports to the Presider,;; - 
Copies of those reports are to be filed with the University Research Council 
and with the University departments concerned. 

VIII. Patents: The patent policy of the Institute shall conform to that 
of the University. 

IX. Advantages to the University 

a. Stimulation of the development of the polymer industry of the 
Commonwealth 

b. Increase in the volume of fundamental research at the University 

c. Bringing of active research scientists to the University 

d. Financial assistance to graduate students 

e. Enhancement of research reputation of University which will 
aid in attracting graduate students and staff 

X Possible future incorporation in a University Research Institute or 
Foundp.rion; If and when a University Research Foundation is established the 
Polymer Research Institute will be incorporated as a branch of the Founda + icn 



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• 






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', -...•.:. :-.■■ . 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Disbursements - University Fund 
(ok the Period 
July 1, 1.959 - June 17, I960 



Attachment II 



Student. Union Food Service 

Luncheon for Boston Globe reporters 
Luncheon for William Deroinofi! and party 
Luncheon for Earl Carpenter and porty 

Luncheon for teachers of School of Education 

Faculty Christinas party 

Luncheon for hoard of visitors 

Luncheon for Rabbi Ruehsmes and party 

Tor for Newcomers Club 

Luncheon for Buildings & Grounds Committee 

Refreshments for President's Reception 

Luncheon for Dr- Gillespie and party 

Luncheon for Dean Hopkins ss*d party 

Luncheon for New England Conference on 

Graduate Education 
Luncheon for Honors Council 
Luncheon, for Dean Purvis and party « 

English Conference 
Dinner for Hosse Economics Dean candidate 
Luncheon for Dr. l» Davis and party 
Refreshments for Dr, Ritchie's reception 
Refreshments for seniors and parentis reception 
Luncheon for Or. L. Davis and committee 
Hokkaido Exchange Tea 
Refreshments for Dean Mitchell's reception 

University Boarding Halls 

Luncheon for 'Mr. Ludden and guests 

Mrs, L, a. Price 

Luncheons for candidates for Head of 

Chemistry department 

The Lord J off cry 

Luncheon for President of Kills College! 
Dinner for Mr. Montgomery and guests 
Luncheon for Senator Flanders with Dr. Goodwin 
Expenses of Home Economics dean candidates 
Expenses of Chemistry Dept. Head candidate 
Luncheon for Hews Office guests 



United Air Lines 

Treasurer Johnson to Cleveland 

Estate 



Emily Staples 



Treasurer Johnson 

Misc. travel expenses on Cleveland trip 



; 5.28 

6,12 

24,48 

156.00 

106.07 
19,74 
18.38 
42. 00 
34.48 

136=51 

8,85 

10.56 

91.13 

21.00 

22.7? 

20.79 

22.18 
40,00 
50,00 
24.08 
40,00 
23.00 



27.55 



11.05 



5.28 
10.51 

7.4? 
17.45 
35.26 

5.64 



64,70 



11,86 



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-2- 



Disbursements - University Fund 
for the Period 
July i, 1939 - June 17, IS60 



Emily Do Muir 

Robing trustees Cor cossnencement $ 10.00 

Joint Office of Institutional Research 

1000 Pamphlets on tuition 45.00 

Roberts Flowers 

Roses to Dr. Bart let t 5.71 

Bartiett funeral piece 15.66 

Knowles Fiowershop 

Flowers for President's reception 44.50 

Greens & design for Dr. Woodside*© H. E. 2.00 

Confei*ence 

Hamilton I, Jewell 

Xaprinting diploma ribbons 46.00 

Plates for reprinting article in Boston Globe 104.15 

2000 Booklets & programs for Bicentennial 200.00 

750 Invitations for President's reception 33.05 

200 Secretarial In-Service Training 16.00 

Certificates 

2000 Maps of campus 18.00 

Amherst College 

Printing Four-College calendar 100.00 

Cleaning statues 175.97 

Northampton Commercial College 

Rental of ten typewriters for two weeks 35.00 

University Microfilms 

Film rental 12.00 

Student Government Association 

One-half cost of mailing copies of Bouse 239.68 

Bill #1030 

Postmaster - Amherst 

Postage meter expense for Alumni mailing 266.24 

Gus Perfito 

Orchestra for faculty reception 125.00 

D*Addarlo t s Camera Shop 

Picture for dedication of Mary Lyon House 5.00 



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I 



mscursemants - University Fund 
July l^lM^n, I960 



The Fine Arts Studio 

Mirror for dormitory dedication $ 12.50 

Mrs. Glen Kughes 

Refreshments for dedication of Dwight and 23.25 

Mary Lyon Houses 

Dr. John Karris 

Misc. travel expenses on trip to Ford 3.50 

Foundation 

Institute for College and University Administrators 

Participation See - Academic Deans' Institute 300.00 

Peter Pen Bus Lines 

Transporting Band to Mew York City 365.30 

Miss Gwendolen Carter 

Expense in connection with four-college co- 
operative teaching program 125.00 

Else P. Brown 

Music for President *s reception 40.00 

Helen S< Mitchell 

Travel - Home Economies Conference in 68.66 

Wow York 

Student Art Prizes 

let Miss Ann Shutty 20.00 

2nd Miss Emma Spalding 15.00 

3rd Miss Barbara Goldberg 10.00 

Winthrop Printing fc Offset Co. 

) folders 84.00 

Travel to How York for accrediting of School of Nursing 

John Gillespie 51.25 

Mary E. MacDonald 37.25 

Mary A. Msher 43.45 

Expense of Interviewing Candidates for Dean of Home 

Economics 
Dr c Mar J or ie Knoll - travel 37.33 

Prof. Verda M. Dale - refreshments 3.72 



II 



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I 



Disbursements - University Fund 
for the Period 
July I, X939 - June 17, I960 



Expense of Interviewing Candidates for Dean of 

Home Economics (Continued) 

Prof, Jane McCul lough - refreshments $ 3.42 

Prof. Gladys Cook - refreshments 1,80 

Dr. C, Edith Weir - travel 106.13 

Br. Louise Mejonnier - travel 127,62 

Miss Sarah Hawea - transportation 6.40 

Miss Oreana Merriam » transportation 11*90 

Mrs* Georgia French - transportation 6.40 

Dean Meribeth Cameron 

Honorarium • Women's Honors Tea 25,00 

Dr. J. Harold Smith 

Expense of candidate for Head of Chemistry 8.7S 

Department 

A. J. Hastings 

Special elastic for diplomas 2.SG 

Micheal E. Yarrows 

Emergency trip to Bradley Field 6.40 

Stanley F. Salwak 

Travel exponas to Boston - 2 conferences 7.90 

A' Hern's Store 

20 yards of ribbon for commencement 2.16 

Cecil R. Holden 

Travel to Holyoke for coraraencesKent programs 5.00 

International Cocsnuni cat ions Foundation 

Replace film which was lost on campua 199.87 



Total Disbursements $4,380»64 



I 



* 



! 



! 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSSXTS 

Disbursements - Unrestricted 
Endov7reant Fundi Income for the Period 
July 1, 1359 - June 17 , I960 



Attachment II 
June 17, 1960 



Burnhara Emergency 



I 



Student Onion - Food Service:: 

Luncheons for Agricultural Dean Candidates $ 21.97 

Luncheon served Hureing School Accreditation Group 31.20 

Luncheon for Board of Trustees Executive Gottalttea 26, S5 

Hens Room Luncheon, WB2 10.25 

Vocational Agriculture Administrators 35,97 

Supplies from University Store 31,96 

500 Reprints of Newspaper Series ,"25,08 

Statler Hilton Hotel - expense of treasurer on trip 44,80 
regarding Staples Estate 

tbta. Emily Kuir - assisting at Bicentennial Convocation 10,00 

Specialty Gil':: Shop - supplies for faculty recaption 31.72 

Prof, Albert Linnell - expenses on trip to New HasspGhir© 20.80 
to inppeet telescope 

Pc-stsge for mailing bulletins 23.22 

50 copies of '''Governmental Control of Public 5.00 

Higher Education" 

2 Burnho.ni Prl 40,00 

Luncheons at Faculty Club for candid or 31.20 

Chemistry Department 



$390.12 



F . H. Read 

Scholarship 



$75.00 



I 



William Session 

Student Union Food Service: 
Board of Visitors 

Luncheon for Advisory Council of Kcmen 
League of Women Voters 
Chaolains Luncheon 
Luncheon for Library Conference 
Luncheon for Agricultural Dean Candidate 
Person? Associated with Training Program 



$ 6.50 

35.19 
6,15 
5.2l 

13.37 

11,88 

18.48 



'I 



I 



r 



SI 



I 



I 



2- 



Bisburseirente •■ Unrestricted 
Endowment Fnud Income for the Period 
July 1, 1959 - June 17* 1960 



Wlltiara ..Session (Continued) 

Robert? Flowers - Flowers for Haigis Funeral Service $ 10.30 

Judd Paper Company - cards announcing Faculty Reception 12*74 

Henry Boucher - Travel expenses to Workshop 33.18 

Postage, for saailing invitations to Reception 29,72 

A. J. Hastings • Supplies for President's Reception 8,33 

Hrnnilten Newell •* Plate for use on Reception Cards 3,50 



William Wheeler 



Student Union Food Service: 

luncheon for Junior College Presidents Conference $ 46.49 

Hew Faculty Orientation Luncheon 107,10 

Accreditation Ceramic tee Luncheon for Engineering 24*48 

Luncheon for Board of Vis 60.38 

Coffee for Meeting of Four-College Deans ,75 

Meals for Education Editor 5,10 

Anthony gaits - for preparing and supervising 12.80 

TV Programs 

Koldy Studios * I print of Dr. Gillespie 6.00 

110 yards ribbon for Diplomas 11.88 

Postage for President^ Reception 33.00 

Stanley Salwak • travel to attend Educational 30„08 

Conference en Higher Education 

B.ecordak Corporation - rental o£ 1 Reader S„00 

University Ccswaons •• Ways & Means Cotnasittee Luncheon 22.50 

Luncheon at Faculty Club for University 24 ..70 

Health Service Visiters 

Signs XI Society Chapter for Lecturer 50,00 

$443.26 



GRAND TOTAL $1,103.00 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

July 11, 1960, 12 noon, Parker House, Boston 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Boyden, Brett, Cashin, 
Crowley, Healey, Whitmore and 
Treasurer Johnson 

In the absence of the Secretary, Kenneth W. Johnson was 
appointed Secretary pro tem. 

Chairman Boyden reported the passage of the salary in- 
crease by the General Court fixing a salary for the position of 
President of the University from $20,000 to $25,000 at the discretion 
of the Trustees. He congratulated all trustees and others for their 
fine work in bringing this about. He said that he had the opportu- 
nity to personally thank the Massachusetts Senate and its leadership 
when Senate President Powers invited him to speak to the Senate 
after the passage of the bill. 

Chairman Boyden then said it was now possible, since the 
salary was established, for the Executive Committee to start its 
work of screening the persons recommended for the position of Presi- 
dent in accordance with the procedure established by the Board in 
its vote of September 19, 1959. He presented lists of names of over 
seventy persons who had been suggested. The lists indicated the 
status of each person -- some had withdrawn their names, others were 
interested under certain conditions, etc. 

The committee discussed in detail the procedure it would 
follow. First it was felt that each member of the committee should 
review the list in detail. For the next meeting of the committee 
the lists would be rearranged as one complete list of all names with 



2251 



President 



2252 



COMMITTEE 



Salaries 



L . Lawrence 
Taylor 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

an asterisk before each name that was not interested and with a 
dossier on each remaining person. This material would be examined 
by the Executive Committee and then sent to each member of the 
Board. 

There was agreement that no person should be eliminated 
by the Executive Committee in whom any Trustee had a substantial 
interest. After the screening process had reduced the list, the 
committee would present its recommendations to the Trustees in the 
form of a list of the most outstanding persons, including those in 
whom an interest had been expressed by any Trustee, for final inter- 
view and selection. 

Treasurer Johnson reported on the salary adjustments for 
certain administrative positions that had been budgeted by the 
Trustees and now partially adopted by the Legislature. This leaves 
certain positions at levels below those established by the Trustees. 
He stated that if the Trustees desired to move for salary adjust- 
ments for those positions dropped from the list, it would be 
possible to re-submit them as an amendment to the Supplementary 
Budget request. Because of the probable legislative timing this 
would need to be done earlier than the August 16th meeting of the 
Board. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : In accordance with Article IV of the By- 
Laws of the Board of Trustees which pro- 
vides that "The Executive Committee shall 
act for the Board of Trustees in intervals 
between Board meetings", and under the 
provisions of Section 13 of Chapter 75 of 
the General Laws the following position 
is continued on a temporary basis from 
July 1, 1960 at the salary indicated: 
Head of Department "A", L. Lawrence 
Taylor, at $11,336. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To amend the Supplementary Budget request 
adopted on June 4, 1960, by adding the 
following items thereby reaffirming the 
salary level established by the Trustees 
for these positions as follows: 

Reallocate and make permanent 1 Head of 
Department "A", U of M, (Gilbert. Mottla) 
to Director of Communications, U of M, 
Job Group No. 22. 

Change Job Group No. of: 

From 
Construction & Maintenance 

Engineer, U of M 19 
Superintendent of Buildings & 

Grounds, U of M 17 

Assistant Treasurer, U of M 18 

Controller, U of M 19 

Treasurer, U of M 24 

Assistant Registrar, U of M 13 

Placement Officer, U of M 12 



To 

23 

19 
20 
22 
27 
14 
13 



At the request of Chairman Boyden, Treasurer Johnson re- 
viewed the correspondence from the Commissioner of Administration 
pertaining to the conference known as the "Amherst Summer Music 
Center". The committee discussed the conference policy and ex- 
pressed confidence in the program. In the light of the 
Commissioner's request for a review of policy by the Board, it was 
directed that this item be placed on the agenda of the August 16th 
meeting of the Board. 

It was 

VOTED : To hold the next meeting of the Executive 
Committee at the Parker House on Monday, 
July 18, at 11:00 a.m. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 




Kenneth W. Johnson, Secretary pro tem 



2253 



Music 

Center 

summer 



2254 



COMMITTEE 



Gift of 
Mrs. John S. 
Ames 



Sale of 
Stock 



Hokkaido 

University 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

July 18, 1960, 11:00 a.m., Parker House, Boston 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Boyden, Cashin, 
Crowley, Whitmore. Also 
Secretary Gillespie and Treasurer 
Johnson 

At its meeting on May 24, 1960, the Board of Trustees 

voted to accept a gift of $900 from Mrs. John S. Ames to purchase 

an animal at the Langwater Dispersal. To effectuate the gift, 

Mrs. Ames sent the University 13 shares of General Electric stock 

and requested that they be sold. On recommendation of the 

Treasurer and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson 
to sell the 13 shares of General Electric 
stock from Mrs. Nancy F. Ames and any money 
left over after the animal purchased at the 
Langwater Dispersal is paid for is to be 
deposited in the University Fund providing 
Mrs. Ames intends for the University to 
have all the money resulting from the sale 
of stock. 

On recommendation of the Treasurer and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Provost Shannon McCune to 
sign amendment #3 to contract between 
United States of America and Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts 
covering the University- Hokkaido Uni- 
versity ICA contract revised budget to 
August 31, 1961. 

The following resolution was adopted: 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WHEREAS, it is the desire of the University of 
Massachusetts to engage in a Joint Project for the 
Planning of a New History Course during the summer of 
1960 with Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts; 
Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts; 
and Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts; as a 
part of the program of four-college cooperation; 

WHEREAS, the University of Massachusetts' 
share of the cost of this joint project is agreed 
to be $500; 

WHEREAS, said Smith College, Northampton, 
Massachusetts has been designated and agrees to 
receive, disburse and account for the funds from 
the above participating institutions of higher 
learning for the Joint Project; 

NOW THEREFORE, it is VOTED: To authorize the 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, to make payment of 
$500 to Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts 
for the University's share of the cost of the 
Joint Project for the Planning of a New History 
Course from 03 funds. 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that the balance of about 
$2700 in special fund allocated to the Trustees for the recruitment 
of presidential candidates cannot be used in this fiscal year. It 
was agreed by the Executive Committee members that Chairman Boyden 
would write Commissioner Morrissey and attempt to get the un- 
expended balance transferred back to the Trustees so that they may 
continue to finance their recruiting program for president. 

Chairman Boyden distributed biographical material on 
persons nominated for the presidency of the University of Massachu- 
setts. Since there were in excess of 100 names, on recommendation 
of Trustee Boyden and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To close the nominations of persons for 
President. 

The Executive Committee examined the biographical 

material on all nominees and discussed the relative merits of 

each person. 



2255 



Four 
College 
Cooperative 
Agreement 



President 



2256 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was agreed that the Executive Committee would meet 
again at 11 o'clock on August 1st at the Parker House, Boston to 
continue the screening process in preparation of submitting names 
to the Full Board of Trustees for their consideration. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 




/John Gl 
Secretary, B<(>a 




Trustees 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF THE TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
August 4, 1960, Parker House, Boston 
Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Boyden, Cashin, 
Crowley, Healey, Whitmore, and 
Treasurer Johnson 



A waiver of the seven-day notice of the call of the meet- 
ing having been signed by each member of the Committee, Chairman 
Boyden called the meeting to order at 11:35 a.m. 

In the absence of the Secretary, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Kenneth W. Johnson Secretary 
pro tem. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that the transfer agents repre 

senting the companies from which the Trustees on June 28, 1960 had 

sold their holdings of common stock were requesting a revised vote 

and certification. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confirm the action of the Board of Trustees 
of June 28, 1960 wherein it was voted: "To 
sell the following common stocks" 
250 shares Indiana Limestone 
54 shares Interlake Steamship Company 
32 shares The Joseph & Feiss Company 
69 shares Transamerica 
and to record this vote as authorizing the 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, to sell, assign, 
and transfer these securities held in the name 
of and belonging to the Board of Trustees of 
the University of Massachusetts and he is 
hereby further empowered to execute any and all 
assignments, powers of attorney, or other in- 
struments as may be necessary, proper or con- 
venient to accomplish any such sale, assignment 
or transfer. 

VOTED : In the absence of the Secretary to empower 
Dr. Frank L. Boyden, Chairman of the Board 
of Trustees, to act as Certifying Officer to 
all actions taken by the Board of Trustees. 



2257 



Stocks 



2258 



COMMITTEE 



Clarence W. 
Shute 



Acting Dean, 
College of 
Arts and 
Sciences 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Boyden presented a memorandum from Provost 

McCune pertaining to a temporary filling of the position of Dean of 

the College of Arts and Sciences that had been vacated by Dean 

Cahill's resignation. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To appoint Dr. Clarence W. Shute, Head 
of the Department of Philosophy, to the 
Summer Session staff from July 31, 1960 
to August 31, 1960 at the weekly salary 
of $254.47 and to recommend to the 
Board of Trustees at the August 16 meet- 
ing that Dr. Shute be appointed Acting 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
effective September 1, 1960. 

The Committee continued their review of the credentials of 
the persons presented for the position of President. Trustee 
Whitmore made a strong plea for strict confidential treatment of all 
names by everyone concerned. He recited instances of cases at other 
universities where a leak of information had forced candidates for 
the position to withdraw with resulting bad publicity to the insti- 
tution and personal embarrassment to the trustees and the candidate. 

Trustee Healey urged fast action in presenting the top 
people selected by the Executive Committee to the Full Board. 

The Committee interviewed one person who was in the area 
at this time. 

Chairman Boyden was asked to communicate with each Trustee 
pertaining to the next meeting of the Board. 

Trustee Healey was asked to inform the Governor's Office 
of the Committee's interest in the recent opinion from the Attorney 
General's Office pertaining to the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association and to urge all speed possible in implementing 
the course of action indicated therein. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:00 

Secretary pro tern" 




WAIVER OF MEETING NOTICE 



I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the 
meeting of the Executive Committee of the Board 
of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
called to convene for Thursday, August 4, 1960, 
at 11:00 a.m. at the Parker House, Boston, Mass. 



Date, 

Date 1 Name 




Name, / 



^y; Is * 



Date / Nam 



Date /7 'J ^ava^/'y^// 

^ sKa* r A y /?S q -fan a 

Date "^ s^l ■/ Name 



Date 



/T / Name 




I 



' 



I] 



COMMITTEE 



I 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

October 22, 1960, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, U of M 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Haigis, Schuck, Whitmore, 
President Lederle. Also, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Gillespie, 
Engineer Hugill 

A quorum being present, Chairman Whitmore called the 
meeting to order. 

Rev. David J. Power of the University's Newman Club and 
Mr. Harry J. Tessier, architect, were invited to join the meeting. 

Committee members considered the plan for the new Newman 
Center which is to be constructed on land contiguous to University 
property. Father Power explained the function of the building and 
the work of the Newman Club. He stated that the large number of 
students of the Catholic faith (2575) enrolled at the University of 
Massachusetts have swamped the Catholic religious facilities in the 
town of Amherst and that it is necessary to have a new facility 
where the Catholic students could attend to their religious 
practices in addition to participating in Newman Club activities. 
Two lots adjacent to the University were purchased by the Bishop of 
Springfield - a corporation sole - for the construction of such a 
facility. After obtaining legal advice as to the building require- 
ments, plans were drawn for a Newman Center. The Town Manager had 
the Town Counsel rule on whether or not the plans for the Newman 
Center could be used under the zaing laws of the town of Amherst. 
The Town Counsel ruled contrary to the original opinion obtained 
by Father Power. He opined that the set-back regulation in the town 
zoning ordnance did apply to the Newman Center and thus the Newman 



Newman 
Center 



2260 



COMMITTEE 



Capital 
Outlay 



Building 
Authority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Club plans could not be used on their site. Due to a previous 
ruling by the Attorney General that the Bishop of Springfield - 
a corporation sole - was not a "society, association, or 
fraternity established thereat" the University (G.L. Chapter 75), 
the Trustees did not have power to sell land to him. The Newman 
Club of the University was then incorporated as the University of 
Massachusetts Newman Club, Inc. at Amherst, Massachusetts to meet 
the requirements of Chapter 75. Now the Newman Club, Inc. would 
like to construct the building in line with the adjacent fraterni- 
ties and recommends that the Board of Trustees sell 10,633 square 
feet of University property located to the rear of the Newman Club 
property, lots 22 and 23. 

After visiting the planned location of the Newman Center, 
it was decided that Trustee Schuck was to determine if the pre- 
liminary design of the New Center as presented to the committee has 
progressed to the point where it controls the use of the site and 
report to the full Board meeting on Wednesday, October 26, 1960. 

Treasurer Johnson made a progress report on construction 
projects contained in Attachment A to these minutes and hereby made 
a part of these minutes. 

Mr. Whitmore reviewed the capital outlay program and its 
status in the General Court. He said that there was some legisla- 
tive resistance to the plan of establishing a building authority 
to construct dormitories and other self-liquidating buildings and 
he noted that some objection has been raised to the requirement 
that members of the authority be alumni of the University. 

It was announced that the wooden, dilapidated structures 
known as the Liberal Arts Annex and the Old Mathematics Building 



a 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



2261 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

were vacant. The committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
demolition of the Liberal Arts Annex and 
the Old Mathematics Building and further 
recommended that the Board of Trustees 
authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson to 
take the necessary steps for the demolition 
of the Liberal Arts Annex and the Old 
Mathematics Building. 

Treasurer Johnson announced that the agricultural land 

committee of the faculty had resumed meetings during the summer and 

after inspecting many sites has agreed that land between 

Mt. Sugarloaf and the Connecticut River in South Deerfield would 

be desirable for the College of Agriculture. Under consideration 

is approximately 188 acres of tillable land, 284 acres of pasture 

and woodland and 2.5 acres of house lots in South Deerfield. The 

committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson 
to start negotiations obtaining tentative 
selling prices, surveys and appraisals as 
preliminary work necessary before any pur- 
chase could be made and further authorized that 
the contract with Gordon Ainsworth & Associates 
of South Deerfield, who are now under contract 
to the University, be extended so that they may 
start making necessary negotiations and surveys. 

The Amherst Taxi Inc. of Amherst, Massachusetts sub- 
mitted a proposal to operate a taxi service on the campus. The 
committee recommends that the Board of Trustees at this time does 
not grant a taxi permit on campus. 

The committee studied a plan prepared by the Department 
of Landscape Architecture for the landscaping of the northwest area 
of the School of Education site. The committee then visited the 
site and was in agreement that the approach to the building from 
the north on North Pleasant Street should be beautified in 



Liberal Arts 
Building 



Old Mathematics 
Building 



Land 



Amherst Taxi 
Inc. 



School of 
Education - 
landscaping 



2262 



COMMITTEE 



Architects 



Bartlett 
Hall 



Maintenance 
Building 



Dormitories 
16 and 17 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

accordance with the proposed plans. It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson be 
authorized to request the Division of 
Building Construction to enter into a con- 
tractual arrangement for the execution of 
the plan to beautify the northwest area of 
the School of Education site. In carrying 
out the necessary work, an easement should 
be obtained from the abutter to permit 
entry onto her property for certain drainage. 

Trustee Schuck continued to be optimistic about obtaining 
funds for consulting architects. She suggested that from the funds 
a campus planner be added along with the architects already approved 
by the Board. 

The committee made an inspection tour of new buildings and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of Bartlett Hall, Mass. State 
Project U-802 as completed in accordance 
with the plans and specifications subject 
to correction of certain details to the 
satisfaction of the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts effective 
July 20, 1960. 

The committee inspected the Maintenance Building, and 

found that it had been completed in accordance with the plans and 

specifications and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
accept the Maintenance Building, Project 
U-58-1, as completed as of June 1, 1960. 

On dormitories #16 and 17, the committee read a report from 
the Treasurer and the Construction Engineer that the details remain- 
ing unfinished at the last inspection by the Trustees have been 
completed or are under contract for completion and, therefore, the 
committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of dormitories #16 and 17. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



2263 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee made a physical inspection of dormitories 
18 and 19. It was noted that the landscaping had not been com- 
pleted around dormitory 18. The Treasurer explained that this was 
a matter of a separate contract that the Building Association was 
now arranging. The committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of dormitories 18 and 19. 

On recommendation of the Treasurer and the Construction 

Engineer, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 
accept as of September 21, 1960 the com- 
pleted contract #2-Library Ventilation 
under project U-803. 

The committee viewed the new coal unloading facilities and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

acceptance of the coal unloading facilities 
project U-702 contract No. 19, as completed 
July 20, 1960. 

The committee visited the tennis courts at the Women's 

Physical Education Building and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the tennis courts, project 
U-603 contract No. 3, when the final details 
are completed to the satisfaction of the 
Treasurer of the University. 

Chairman Whitmore pointed out that the Board of Trustees 
has only 21 days from the passage of an appropriation act to submit 
the names of recommended architects to the Commission on Administra- 
tion and Finance. In anticipation of a capital outlay program and/oi 
the establishment of a building authority, the committee recommended 
the following architects for the designated projects in the follow- 
ing order of priority. 



Dormitories 
18 and 19 



Library - 
ventilation 



Coal Unloading 
Facilities 



Tennis Courts - 
Women's Physical 
Education 



Architects 



2264 



COMMITTEE 



Louis W. 
Ross 



Architect 



Dining 
Commons - 
Architects 



Dormitories 
Architects 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee unanimously recommended that the Board of 
Trustees recommend Louis W. Ross be appointed the architect for 
dormitories 20 and 21. Mr. Ross was asked by the University of 
Massachusetts Building Association back in 1959 to design these two 
dormitories. This he did in good faith and the committee feels a 
moral responsibility to do everything it can to see that Ross's 
plans are the ones selected for the two new dormitories. Mr. Ross 
has financed all the work on these plans and it was through no 
fault of his that the plans which he had ready in 1959 have not 
been executed. 

The committee 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees recommend that 
Gordon Ainsworth & Associates of South 
Deerfield be appointed to provide a survey 
crew to make layouts of utilities and 
services, new buildings, and to prepare 
record drawings of work put in place in- 
cluding all utilities and services now 
existing underground. This recommendation 
is made for an engineering survey of this 
type with the approval of Hall Nichols, 
Director of Building Construction for the 
Commonwealth. 

The committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that for the new Dining Commons the 
following architects be approved: 

1. The Architects Collaborative, Cambridge 

2. Hugh Stubbins & Associates, Inc., Cambridge 

3. Paul Rudolph, New Haven, Conn. 

For the dormitories to house more than 1,000 students 
south of the University Dining Commons: 

1. Hugh Stubbins & Associates, Inc., Cambridge 

2. Harrison & Abramovitz, New York City 

3. Minoru Yamasaki, Birmingham, Mich. 

4. Ieoh Ming Pei, New York City 

5. James A. Britton, Greenfield 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS PROJECT STATUS 
as of September 15, 1960 



ATTACHMENT* 



No. 



Title 



Arch itect & Engr, 



U-702 




Contr . 


14 




15A 




16A 




17 




18 


U-603 




Contr. 


3 


"-802 




Contr. 


2 


U-803 




Contr. 


2 


G57-1 




Contr. 


2 


J58-2 




U58-4 




058-5 




T 58~6 




U59-1 





Sewer, Water & Drainage Whitman & Howard 

Steam I istribution System Merrill Associates 
Electric Distribution System " " 
2 Steao Generating Units " " 
Htg.&V€nt .Controls for " " 
Boilers 

Tennis Courts Univ. of Mass. 

Somen's Physical Education (Constr. Engr.) 



Liberal Arts Building 
Language Lab. Equipment 

Addition to Library 
Vent. Improvements 

Science Center 
Third Section 

School of Education 

Inf irmary 

Engineering Shops 

Cold Storage Building 

Add. to Dining Commons 



Shepley, Bui finch, 
Richardson & Abbott 

Ames and Graves 



Desmond and Lord 



Desmond and Lord 

Thomas A, Kir ley 

John Guarino 

S. S. Eisenberg 

Kilham, Hopkins .Greeley 
and Brodie 



Funds 


Contr. Oblig. 


% 


Contractor Available 


To Date 


Complete 


R. Zoppo Co., Inc. ) 


$ 589,180.50 


84 


Hart Engr. Co. ) 


561,506.07 


95 


RichardsonElectric Co. ) 


252,428.82 


88 


Union Iron Works );|;2, 339 ,000. 


367,9 p 0.00 


75 


Thomas C . Vincent , Inc . ) 


273,800.00 


2 


S. P. Puffer, Jr. 28,897.48 


28,852.00 


70 


Magnetic Recording 


23,980.00 


100 


Instruments, Ltd. 






Jiley & Foss Co. 


8,225.00 


100 



Joseph Rugo,Inc. 



Joseph Rugo, Inc 



2,072,000. 1,447,380.77 



2,292,000 



D . *Conne 1 1 ' sSons , Inc . 1 , 060 , 000 



D. A. Sullivan&Sons,Inc.905,000, 



J.F.WhiteContr. Co. 



747,000. 



D.A.Sullivan&Sons.Inc. 595,000. 



1,681,817.93 

878,845.00 
684,578.00 
632,000.00 

504,475.00 



22 

70 

39 



26 

15 



Remarks 



Completion date 10/28/60 
CotQDletion date V28/60 
Completion date 10/13/60 
Completion date — ? 
Completion date 6/14/61 



Completion date 9/27/60 

Completion date 9/3/60 
Final ins nee t ion 9/21/60 
Completion date 10/24/61 

Completion date 1/1/61 
Completion date 10/2/61 
Contract Awarded 9/3/60 
Completion date 3/26/61 

Completion date 8/20/61 











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1 



COMMITTEE 



2265 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting adjourned at 6:30 p.m. 






John Gillespie 
Secretary!, Board ov Trustees 



I 



< 



2266 



COMMITTEE 



Athletic 

Policy 

Statement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS 
November 12, 1960, 10:30 a.m., Student Union, Univ. of Mass. 

Chairman Cashin presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Cashin, Crowley, Healey, 
Pumphret, Whitmore. Also, Provost 
McCune, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Gillespie. Also present were members 
of the University Athletic Council: 
Richason, Chambers, Johnston, Winn, 
Shaw, Cadigan, Tunis and Dean McGuirk 

Provost McCune cited the Athletic Policy for the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts which the Board of Trustees adopted in 
1957 and which the University administration was attempting to 
implement. He felt that the policy should form the basis for the 
discussion of the Trustee Committee on Athletics and the Athletic 
Council. 

STATEMENT ON ATHLETIC POLICY FOR 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WHEREAS, since its founding in 1863, the University of 
Massachusetts has recognized the necessity of providing more than 
technical and classical instruction for young men and women in 
preparation for adult life and 

WHEREAS, a sound physical education program is recognized 
as an essential need for the development of a healthy personality, 
able to absorb and use wisely the intellectual offerings of a 
University and 

WHEREAS, the physical education program has not kept pace with 
the progress of the University in other areas 

BE IT RESOLVED that the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts endorse the following policy and direct the administra- 
tion and faculty to take the necessary steps for its implementation: 

1. The required physical education program for both men 
and women students in the freshman and sophomore years 
shall continue to be an essential part of the 
University's requirement for the undergraduate degree 

2. The intramural athletic program shall be staffed 
and equipped to meet the needs of all students who 
desire to participate, and the University shall 



I 



I 



I 



I 



2267 



COMMITTEE 



■ 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

encourage participation through a varied program 
including sports with "carry-over" value for life 
after graduation 

3. Professional courses in physical education shall 
be offered for those students desiring to major 
or minor in physical education as a prelude to 
careers as coaches or teacher- coaches 

4. Consistent with present policies on admissions 

and academic standards, the intercollegiate athletic 
program shall be developed to a point where it is 
representative of the best efforts of the University, 
with aims and ideals of achievement comparable to 
those expected of the academic departments. This 
development shall proceed in accord with policies 
and regulations of the National College Athletic 
Association, the Eastern College Athletic Conference 
and the Yankee Conference, in each of which the 
University maintains membership. 

Provost McCune pointed out that Warren McGuirk held two 
positions - both directed toward implementing this policy. As 
Dean of the School of Physical Education, he is concerned with the 
academic program and as Director of Athletics he is concerned with 
the intercollegiate and intramural programs. 

Dean McGuirk announced that there are now 164 men major- 
ing in Physical Education and Recreation and 58 women majoring in 
Physical Education and Recreation. In the program required of 
freshman and sophomore men and women, 1742 men and 1322 women are 
taking required Physical Education courses. In addition 320 women 
are enrolled in the women's athletic association. 

Mr. McGuirk lamented that he is unable to take care of 
the students who want to participate in the intramural program be- 
cause of the paucity of athletic facilities. He pointed out that 
the crowded conditions of tennis will be alleviated when the 
women's tennis courts become available next spring. 



2268 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

As Director of Athletics, Mr. McGuirk informed the 
committee that 950 boys are associated with 16 formalized sports at 
the varsity level and 13 formalized sports at the freshman level. 
He pointed out the need for a junior varsity program in 1961 which 
would enable the University to field junior varsity teams in base- 
ball, basketball and football. 

Dean McGuirk said that the goal of the Athletic Department 
is "total participation" for all who wish to engage in an activity. 
He pointed out that the University has formalized more sports than 
any other school in the Yankee Conference and most colleges in the 
Northeast. A sport can become formalized and thus available for 
budgeted money only if it has survived two years of private support 
and supervision by the students who wish to participate in the 
sport . 

The intramural program of the University was discussed at 
length by Director of Athletics McGuirk. This year 2225 students 
are identified with intramural activities - the maximum number that 
may be accommodated. (Intramural report enclosed) This is not the 
number of persons who would like to participate. Mr. McGuirk gave 
six recommendations to the committee for improving the intramural 
program. 

1. A full-time intramural director 

2. The assignment of a graduate assistant to the 

intramural department 

3. Appropriate increases in available 03 funds 

4. Separate equipment inventory 

5. Expanded budget for equipment and supplies 

6. An increase in the availability of indoor and outdoor 

facilities to accommodate increased participation 
as requested by students 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Because the University has only one illuminated football 
field, the intramural program can only accommodate one team for 
every 200 male students. This year there were enough requests to 
make up 98 teams; however, the facilities could only accommodate 
22 teams and thus the number was reduced to that. Director McGuirk 
announced that when the intramural field is relocated and appro- 
priate lighting installation provided, there will be three regula- 
tion football fields. This will enable more teams to participate 
and at the same time reduce the lateness of the hour that many 
teams are scheduled under the present limited setup. It pointed 
out that there is a need to wind up the intramural program earlier 
in the evening so that student participants and spectators may have 
more evening hours for purely academic study. 

Dean McGuirk discussed the two-year required physical 
education program which the Trustees feel should continue to be an 
essential part of the University's requirement for the under- 
graduate degree. In fulfilling the two-year requirement, all 
students must have participated in: 

1. Four team sports of their choice from the follow- 
ing activities: soccer, volleyball, lacrosse. 
Team sport requirement may be satisfied by being 
a member of the following freshman or varsity 
squad: football, soccer, track, basketball, 
swimming, baseball, hockey, lacrosse, tennis, 
golf, wrestling. 

2. One dual activity elected from the following: 
wrestling, tennis, badminton. 

3. Two individual activities elected from the follow- 
ing: gymnastics, track and field, archery, golf, 
trampolining, tumbling. 

4. Aquatics. 



2269 



2270 



COMMITTEE 



Athletic 

Fee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

5. Special or carry-over value sports are emphasized 
in order that the student may develop an adequate 
knowledge of and sufficient technique in a 
variety of sports which may serve as healthful 
and satisfying leisure time pursuits throughout 
his life. 

During the summer counselling program, students may take proficiency 
tests and the results may be used as the basis of waiving one 
semester of the required program. During the past year, 698 stu- 
dents "proficiencied out" of one semester requirement. 

Dean McGuirk said that in addition to the organized intra 
mural program that there are held co-recreation night in the 
women's swimming pool where many students avail themselves of a 
free swimming session. 

The scholarship aid that is available for student 
athletes is $62,000. This was derived from (1) income from the 
vending machines - $31,000 (2) unrestricted endowments - $4,500 
(3) income from gate receipts and (4) minor sources such as 
Patriots football scholarship game and Globetrotters scholarship 
game. Director McGuirk pointed out that scholarship aid is avail- 
able only in the sports of football, basketball and baseball. He 
would like to extend it to other sports, particularly hockey. 

Dean McGuirk pointed out that the major concern of the 
athletic program now is financing. The student athletic fee, which 
undergraduates pay ($20.00) to support the intercollegiate program ■ 
includes season tickets for all home games and the privilege of a 
reduced admission charge for games scheduled off campus. This year 
fees will total approximate $113,000. 

Dean McGuirk pointed out that in fairness to the students 
attending the University of Massachusetts, we should do a much 



I 



COMMITTEE 



2271 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

better job in providing adequate facilities and opportunities for 
more complete participation in the total program. He urged the 
Athletic Committee of the Trustees to keep in mind the urgency of 
the problem and hoped that a high priority would be given to new 
physical education, recreation and athletic facilities in the 
capital outlay program of the University. He also pointed out 
that the Athletic Departnent will be required to vacate Alumni 
Field because of University expansion and without further delay 
these facilities must be relocated in accordance with the Univer- 
sity Master Plan. In the light of increased costs due to the de- 
preciated dollar and to the goal of the Athletic Department of ex- 
tending more opportunities to students, Dean McGuirk urged that 
the student athletic fee be increased $5.00 a semester. 
The meeting adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




2272 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



I 



Ss 



'■ '-;,' 



I 



THE EFFECT OF FACILITY LIMITATIONS Aim INADEQUACIES 01! TIU: NORMAL 
GROWTH kW Mr,?h;L0?IM!T OF Tffi INTRAifJHAL PliOGR'-.j; AT 
TIE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



I 



I 



I 



I 



THE EFFECT OF FA; JtAL 

ORCWTH AND DEVEI 'AT 

THE UNTVE! C 



I 



udent Participation 

Football Basketball 



L957-58 



1958-59 



L959-60 



L960»61 



285 



560 



$96 



.&6QQ *-5ft- 



§ 800 



1|00 



Volleyball Wi *0B3* Tennia Total 

* — » n hm 












3U0 



516 



I- 



U6c 

518 












L 



^9 



h$ 



, 



- 

a* 1 - 62 &IJ88 — 

* Program limits with 



"in^£m:~Xi5~, M? , &--. 









53 



7U 



#75 



JWO 



*"*——*—-— ' » ' I ' " i n i-il I -M— — —I 1 



1215 



1563 



2068 



I 



Program 
Factors tliat hinder tht^ K. -f jlte;. 

1. Touch Football* In the touch football prof ansa are played on one foot* 

ball fleld a This field la ala iman practice field 

before inU'ajaurala atart at 5i30 in the ndition of thia field 

ia auch that it can be a sericu: well — being of tbe 

students who must use it« In the last 1/3 ol ral football aeeaon 

this field becomes a continuous the past season, 6 games 

an evening have been scheduled in order e the program within ths 

limits of the \ncrmal football s The interest o : :nts in the program 

ia indicated by- the f^ en scheduled on Friday 

eveningSo Not one 3ingle forfeit has re8ulted his Friday scheduling 

pattern, Donaitory etiTdents Lmited to . .organization per 150 students c 

Those llmitationSg ace. lation, are necosssry in order to fit the 
full schedule within the alloted .time* 

2e Fasketball— . 550 students representing 1j5 t^tmo will play 200 games in Intramural 
basketball, starting December 5 end ending t] of Feb:ruary This total 
schedule must take plaoe in laao t! Because of athletic coo- 
adttmenta, con^erte,. convoeatione: , Llities are avail- 
able to the Men's Intramural program en 1 rage of 10 evenings a month, 
after 8il5<> Gares are scheduled from 8il5 to 11«00 P.M.. Late hour3 are a 
definite imposition on student sti ;3 S Dc tents are 
extremely diligent in mooting t fcgain, student parti- 
oipation has been linA'iied bee of the facilities e This year, In 
order to better utilise facllitiee, a "week* will be sponsored 
with all team play t eking place on Sunday toons # This is especially 
de signed to accomodate the r i of tho stu< : '. • remain on campus week- 
ends for recreational and athletic outlet 

3t Softball— In softball, 10 games an g are played, just as soon as varsity 
squads leave the playinj are: s. Tho nraiber of toa:.io playing softball completely 
fills the time allotted with League pl*y« Plny-offe for championship and post- 
ponements because of v to be scheduled on weekends or during 



I 



free time at the beginning of the 



Volleyball— The time and 
elimination tovmament t' 
Round robin 






or \'< 



♦ Ha 



ie for the double- 
al Departments 



i 



I 



I 



5» Wrestling — The Intramural wrestling tournament was conducted on a trial basis 
in I960 and was extremely successful with over 500 students present to watch 
the finals. Indications are that this program, too, will grow and place an 
even greater burden on tha Curry Hicks scheduling pattern* 

6 Tennis— Facilities for tennis are completely adequate at presento Only 8 courts, 
however, are in top-notch condition And can be used for championship play It 
is assumed that the reconditioning of the other courts will take place on schedule, 

7* Lacrosse— A pilot league in lacrosse was started this year Again, this gives 
every indication of becoming a successful addition to the Intramural program. 
Because play takes place in the afternoon, present space and facilities are 
adequate 

8 Others— A hole-in-one contest, a swimming meet, and a track meet are all In- 
cluded within the scope of our present intramural programs, No problems of 
space and facilities are present in planning these activities. 

Administrative Factors 

The administration of the Intramural Program is a part-time faculty assignment, and 
Is carried out concurrently with responsibilities in the Physical Education Major program 
(PoEoU3«* p .E.$3-P E 61i), fta * responsibilities in the Required program, and responsibili- 
lities in the Athletic program (cross-country-indoor track-spring track) Assistance it 
provided by threes student-supervisors and a group of seltctsd student officials. 

The student Intramural participating population has increased at a greater rate than 
the increase in general school population This reflects the increasing interest of the 
student in campus-sponsored recreational and social pursuits „ This also reflects the 
increased attention given to scheduling and promotion of intramurals by the School of 
Physical Education,, 

This mushrooming has resulted in a program that demands more than part-time faculty 
consideration. 

Recommendations 



I 



lo The appointment of a full-tim© Intramural Director. 

2o The assignment of a graduate assistant to the Intramural Department. 

3, Appropriate increases in available 03 Funds. 

Ue A separate equipment inventory. 

J>o Expanded budget consideration for equipment and supplies . 

6. Adequate facilities to provide for increase in the Intramural Prof^ram. 

A. Lighting installation should He located in the 1 st. section of Physical 
Education and Athletic field's west of the cage, so that we may have proper 
lighting facilities for three regulation football fields. 

Bo 2 nd seotion of Physical Education and Athletic facility is a must to 
provide additional Softball s Lacrosse and Soccer fields for contemplated 
expansion in Intramural and Athletio Program. 



I 



31*00 
3200 
3000 

2800 
2600 
2UO0 
2200 

2000 
1800 
1600 

moo 

1200 
1000 

800 
600 

Uoo 
200 



TOTAL PARTICIPATION 



1 



• I- ■*> 



mmm imm 



1 



I 



1957*58 1958-59 1959-60 



NUMBER OF ACTIVITIES 



1960-61 



1961^62 



5 activities 



11 actiYitias 



amount of total 
participation being 
denied by facility 

limitation* 



I 



1 2 3 U 5 6 7 8 9 10 ll! 12 13 Hi 15 16 17 

activity kiadt 
eet by present 

faoilitiaa 



I 



lij&t deterained 

by preeent faeilitiea 



D 



s 200 
partleipanta 




I -SI actiritie 



■ 



1 



* 







m 



■ 



m mm 








V'i " 



&&. 




















4